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Recording Learning


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We have just had a OFSTED consultant in school and she has told me that I need to ensure that the children can tell me what they are learning in every area in my room/ outside etc.. I need to make clear to them what their learning objective is and record each week, each child and what they have learnt/done in each area and use thisto plan for the following week. Some areas are easy if there is a particular directed activity, but what about the malleable area or my workshop where they can do their own thing a lot of the time.

She said the same for the nursery and wasn't happy that our 3 year olds told her they were making clay animals and putting bits on- they should have been saying whatt they were learning? I feel that I must have lost the plot somehow.

Anyone got a good sheet for checking all this in terms of obs and assessment?

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xD:o:(:(:( :wacko: xD

Oh my God! I can't believe that Jacquiel. I've heard of sharing learning objectives but never heard that a 3 year old should be able to share them with any adult who walks in the room! What's that all about? The child could be learning all number of things from making animals with clay, regardless of what your indended learning objective was. The experience itself is surely the most important thing? Is she coming back this consultant? When does she think you're going to find the time to record all that for every child every week? :rolleyes: Madness!

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I wonder if the consultant has lost the plot xD

 

From what you have written the 3 yr olds have shown the consultant what they have learnt by their comments.

1. They know that the media they were using is called "Clay"

2. They know that clay can be purposefully moulded to represent their ideas

3. They have also shown that they have learnt and used the skill of dexterity to add "bits on".

4. They know where to add their "bits on" to represent their definition of what an animal looks like.

 

The children would most probably do all of the above even if the desired learning objective was to "Describe the texture of things"

 

So, when we ask a child "What did you learn?" What answer would the Inspector prefer, all the above or a child saying " ( I learnt that) It feels squidgy"

 

Your guess is as good as mine. :o

 

Is this all about children learning how to assess their own learning and therefore becoming responsible for their own learning in a way that can be measured by them, thus saving us having to do it.?

 

Children are already so very good at doing this, it's just our job to interpret their learning to fit in with the cumbersome assessment criteria that we all have to work with.

 

Lets just keep the childrens "work" their "play" and not expect them to justify their "play" to us.

 

Peggy

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It may sound ridiculous but this is exactly what we are going to have to do at my school. We are leading up to OFSTED coming and this is obviously what they are looking for. From Year 6 to Nursery we have to write on a laminated sheet what `we are going to learn` and also on another sheet `what I am looking for` i.e. as the adult . For example - we are learning to order numbers 0 - 5 , I am looking for everyone to order correctly numbers 0-5. Will let you know how I get on.

Also I have booked Early Years Advisor to do an inset on Outdoor Curriculum on 11th Feb - will feed back to everyone at half term.

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Hi Jacquiel

Cant offer any words of inspiration I'm afraid. Only words of commiseration as this is the path I could see evolving.

You can of course tell children what they will be doing that day and thereby introduce a learning objective/ intention but how you ensure that the children retain that to tell someone else Im not quite sure.

You can have sheets displayed in each area indicating all the possible learning that could be take place but that rather asumes that your areas are always static!

You could also make sheets describing the learning for that week or that activity I suppose and make a resource bank but its another job to do! Although I think thats what I would be trying to do-----------might even be something to keep me busy in my supplyless days?

 

Good luck.

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So glad it isn't me that's lost the plot. I thought we were supposed to have child initited learning and that doesn't mean that they can tell you what they are learning. She told me that I was giving them wonderful experiences but that they should know why they were doin it and what they were learning? Well we all went thorugh child development training to do that so what hope is there for our 3-5's. The FS curriculum was supposed to save the children from all this formal pressure not make it even worse. Time I got out I think!!! :o

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I just need to ask how old do they think these children are??? And why do they need to be able to explain what they are learning??? Surely this takes away from them being children and learning through play? I would have thought that if they were asked what they were doing they would say "Playing" which is what we want them to do. The learning should be discrete and should not put pressure on such young children.

The day that somebody, OFSTED inspector or otherwise, starts asking the children in my pre-school what they are learning is the day I walk out the door!!

Linda

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I absolutely agree with you all. Absolute rubbish a child may be at an activity for a variety of reasons that may not coincide with the adults learning proposed learning intention anyway. Using the example that you illustrate JacquieL they could be at the clay table because their friend is there, maybe they need to chill out and experience a sensory activity or perhaps they want to make a model or maybe they wish to experience all 3 at once. A young child may not even be able to express all these feelings anyway and they most certainly shouldn't have to. I have just had an Ofsted inspection and the inspector only spoke to 1 child, only because she was barking in his face with a puppet and he couldn't avoid her.

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Jacquie did the consultant see your excellent continuous planning you posted earlier on, I thought it was great.

Perhaps what they also wanted to see was WALT WILF and TIBS although I think a lot of people have dropped TIBS. Type WALT WILF and TIBS into google for more information for those who have not come across them before.

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Poor you & Gwen. :( I can only think that these 'mad' inspectors have missed the point when trying to interpret new methods of assessment for learning. Higher up the school, it is more understandable that it can be an expectation to have a specific learning intention for each activity as the class are mostly taught as a whole (albeit differentiated). However, as we all know, the foundation stage is a completely different kettle of fish.

 

We have taken on 'assessment for learning' in a big way in our school and encourage the children to self evaluate according to learning intentions & success criteria (similar to the WALT & WILF approach many schools use) and many other methods. As a reception teacher, I have had to significantly adapt this approach, choosing to share learning intentions during adult-led group activities only and perhaps focus on a specific 'social skill' throughout all activities. Of course I attempt to guide their learning throughout independent activities by perhaps giving them a focus, but it is utterly ridiculous, no, impossible, to expect a learning intention for each activity going on. Each activity covers a multitude of learning. When will you have the time to write them? Discuss them? And...heaven forbid...actually teach and spend time interacting with the children? xD

 

Do you have an early years advisor at your LEA? If so, what are their thoughts on this madness? If they are in agreement, perhaps you could get them on your side? Are these inspectors current teachers, or are they lecturers who have long since left the profession and merely 'read up' on latest trends in education?

 

I feel really rattled about this for you, as I am working really hard to make my classroom an 'assessment for learning' classroom and have adapted many of the philosophies behind it. Shirley Clarke and Kings College have been heavily involved in introducing the ideas and methodologies behind 'assessment for learning' here in Jersey. They are seen to be leading many of the initiatives and even they will admit that the foundation stage has been left largely to come up with their own interpretations. The focus has specifically been KS2 and secondary. This is not to say that FS and KS1 are not important, ideas just need to be adapted to suit.

 

Well, I'll get off my soap box now :o , but I do hope that you are able to sort this out to a satisfactory conclusion. Let us know how you get on.

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Have used WALT and WILF with Reception, Y1 and Y2 children when on guided activities lead by and working with an adult. Was an excellent way of children knowing what the point of the activity was.

As for using it with younger children really can not agree with it nor would it work for independent activities. You know in your own mind why a certain activity is out but that activity can also have loads of other LI's even ones you hadn't even thought of! FUN even maybe one of them!!!

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