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Famous Paintings


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After reading many posts on the forum regarding famous paintings and the children creating their own impressions of them, it has spurred me on to begin introducing one painting a month.

 

Can anyone help with the best ones i should start with?

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My immediate response is - anything that gives you a buzz!!

 

It's so much easier if you are enthusiastic about it, the children will pick up on your enthusiasm and it will run itself!!

 

That said, ones I have used have included Van Gogh - Sunflowers and Starry Night were terrific!!, Kandinsky's Circles can fascinate, Gaugin usually works, as the children seem to love the warm tones and atmosphere. there's one I particularly like, by Henri Rousseau, called 'Tiger in a Tropical Storm (Surprised)', but it was a bit hit and miss with the children! One that surprised me with it's success, was a Degas of a solitary ballerina. I didn't much care for it, but we had some lovely interpretations (I didn't choose it!) Lots more, of course, those are just a couple.

 

Just leaf through some art books and take it from there! Good luck

 

Sue :D

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My favourite is Matisse: The snail. (Tate modern). He created it by tearing and cutting paper. I took nursery to the gallery and the activity we did there was to choose coloured paper and lay it out on the floor in the same spiral shape as matisse. The paper was torn and shaped to match what they saw.

 

Over the years I also have made a large collection of art postcards and I had a set of ones that showed different types of weather: Renoir:Les parapluies/ breugel winter scene/degas beach scenes etc etc. children would sort the cards according to weather and we would discuss clues in th pictures.

 

There's a good book called "Tell me a story" isbn 1857099303 which has a painting for each letter of the alphabet . It went with an exhibition at the National Gellery a few years back but could still be available. The pictures are chosen because they have good stories you can tell from them!

 

The best thing though is to look at pictures and find ones that inspire you!!!!! :D:D

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Wow, I'm really inspired (after studying art at school I had clean forgotten all of the good guys like Kadinsky and Matisse - I had to copy the bottom opf an iron and a spider plant leaf!!!!!)

 

Those artists really lend themselves to young children anything goes after all.

 

Will go away and think about it and "draw up" some ideas.

 

Janet

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We have used 'Oriental Poppies' by American artist Georgia O'Keefe.

We made poppies from tissue paper and garden sticks and then used oil pastels

to draw and colour the arrangement of poppies. the results from this activity were used in our schools art exhibition.

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What ever your theme is - type this into Google images and see what comes up. I bought some lovely snow scenes by Monet from his garden and house on holiday last summer never seen them before everyone always thinks of his waterlilies. We have used Circles by Kandinsky - look in the gallery I posted our display. Our yr1 class also used Snail by Matisse

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  • 2 weeks later...

Pollocks!!!! :o if you'll excuse the expression

 

Jackson Pollock is sooooo simple to do. His style of painting lends itself to the foundation stage so well. His style of 'Action' painting. allowing the paint to fall, drip, dribble, splash etc over his canvas while he danced around it is so much fun to emulate. Turn up the volume and dance while you create with those big arm actions.

I bought a couple of those bif canvases from The Works bookshop as we wanted a more permanent display. We took the children outside with their socks and shoes off and plenty of protection over their clothes (this was in milder weather) xD and just let them experiment. We also used another canvas for rolling wheels and balls and dragging skipping ropes. The end results were spectacular... we had our own mini Tate Modern!

 

We also did this on a smaller scale experimenting with marble rolling in paint in a shallow tray to create a similar effect.

Have fun!

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Sorry - a bit late with this one!

 

How about Piet Mondrian? He did several "Composition in Black, Red, etc." which consist mainly of different coloured squares. Not necessarily for painting but might be good for collage or drawing with a ruler or around squares/rectangles.

 

Might be a bit different. :)

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There's a fantastic site that lets you download pictures for free and is very comprehensive. Its called Mark Haddon's artchive....

 

www.artchive.com

 

lucyd

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