Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Training


 Share

Recommended Posts

Having just been into my baby room and observed the children having a great time with water play I did comment that they haven't got aprons on. The NN in there who is lovely said "oh I forgot sorry". Also in the past I have had to "teach" new members of staff how to do something as basic as reading a story to a small group

 

This got me thinking about what I would like to see taught at college or on the NVQ. Having worked as a full time Assessor I know what the learners need to do, but basic things such as remembering aprons, how to read a story, how to talk to children, etc. seem to be overlooked. I know they should learn this "on the job" but sometimes unless things are pointed out to them or shown them in black and white, I do find some staff dont have a clue.

 

So in an ideal world what would you like learners to be taught or taught how to do at college??!!

 

Should be an interesting topic!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A professional approach - I know the pay is low but it annoys me to see staff gossiping and chatting at the start of the day when they should be welcoming the children.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Getting them to check when a child has pooed instead of walking around saying "someone smells like they had pooed" ect... just look ok!!!!!!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, of course the apron wasn't as important as the children enjoying themselves which is why they carried on playing!!! But sometimes a reminder is needed for next time!!

 

But the scenario did get me thinking, hence this thread!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah - I'm back.......the ability to read 'upside down' thus enabling you to hold the book so that the children can see the pictures!!!

 

Don't start reading a story to the children until you have read it yourself!!! :(xD

 

Don't say - "this is my favourite book" and proceed to read it - when the children are not the slightest bit interested! :o:(

 

(Have you picked up the fact that I have an axe to grind here!!!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Common Sense,

the ability to actually think about what is the child getting out of this,

what's it like to be a child here

if its not acceptable for you as an adult then why is it ok for the children

try an activity yourself before doing it with the children

etc etc etc!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's ok for a child to 'just be'

 

DON'T LABEL..............children that is (not displays), remember that paper labels have sticky backs, give a child a label and it will stick too, and soon the child will become his/her label.

 

Childrens moods are the product of adults around them, thus their behaviour too.

 

Don't underestimate a childs ability to think for him/herself, to problem solve, to learn.

 

I would estimate that 20 adult directions equates to just one active experience in terms of enabling learning. ( I may have underestimated the number of adult directions here xD )

 

Try to emulate the work colleague you admire, be humble enough to listen and learn from them, then strive to be as good if not better than them.

 

Management / workforce- Don't try to change things that you can't, work the best you can with them, but know that if and when you do earn the position to be able to make changes, remember the things you once wanted to change and more importantly why. (this could be day to day stuff or national government policy)

 

In the eyes of the children their parents are their be all and end all, the most important person in their life, respect this and therefore respect parents. (don't give this just lip service)

 

The relationship with the child should grow from unconditional care/love, remembering that they are the product of mainly nurture compared to nature. (I believe).

 

If it feels wrong, don't do it, but be kind to yourself and understand that you are only human.

 

Positive thinking equals positive results.

 

INITIATIVE (Not sure if this can be taught on a course :o )

 

If you don't know, try asking yourself the question first before asking anyone else to think for you, if you're still not sure, then ask.

 

Don't wait to be asked/directed, just do.

 

Take time to observe, but at an appropriatte time.

 

DON'T TALK, CHAT, MOVE FURNITURE, OR INTERUPT when someone else is reading a story. (preferably, sit with the children, the washing up can wait) Talk to the children about the story ten, twenty, thirty minutes after it's finished.

 

SMILE

 

Get down on floor level.

 

Run, skip, jump, laugh, have fun.

 

You are lucky to have these children in your daily working life, not the other way around.

 

Be proud and happy when the children move on (to school, next room, other transitions), not sad and clingy. Be proud that you have helped prepare them for the natural transitions we all face in life.

 

I could go on..................................................................... :(

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ENJOY THE CHILDREN! - if you don't, you're in the wrong job!

 

It still seems that childcare is considered an "easy option" when careers are discussed with 14 year olds :o

 

Little do they know.................

 

Nona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

getting down on the childrens level at all times when speaking and listening, letting children speak more than the adult

 

what worries me with this training is that if they are doing the core training in a setting then the student is only going to be a good as the setting

 

we are a good setting and i much prefer my girls to train at college getting hands on in their work place but at college they are able to mix discuss issues other practices good or bad

 

thoughts please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just a few years ago or maybe a few more when i did my nneb we did 6 days at college and 4 days in placement. at college we spent all day doing things like setting up a water play activity and discussing what the children would get out of it and then had to observe children using it in the setting. the old days (makes me sound ancient) were definatly more play based.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what worries me with this training is that if they are doing the core training in a setting then the student is only going to be a good as the setting

 

we are a good setting and i much prefer my girls to train at college getting hands on in their work place but at college they are able to mix discuss issues other practices good or bad

 

thoughts please

 

I often thought about this when doing my NVQ a few years ago - we weren't taught how to do anything and was told that's not the point of an NVQ that you do what your setting tells you to do.

How do you know what they tell you to do is right?!

I must admit now, I don't really rate NVQ as a good qualification, NNEB people seem to have had more thourogh training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly my point thumperrabbit it really is only good if the setting is good

im an old NNEB and did 2 years training

my girls doing a cache level3 at college has had some very good training and meeting others as i have said has been invaluable to her

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)