Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Help Child With Autism


 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi I have a child with autism starting in September I already have 2 in the class that will stay with me next year with no support as of yet due to still waiting for a statement(you all know long process). The problem with the child in September is he is not toilet trained in any way and does not know when he goes. Had review to day and said statement might be here for September at a push.

 

Does anyone know the rules and reg if it does with none toilet trained - people have been telling me about need to apply/get some piece of paper or sumthing if changing him everyday and must have a 1:1 before can come into school? not sure how true these statements are.

 

If has no support head/senco has said about him coming in a few hours a day and building him up but SENCO from nursery said needs to be treated no different to other transision process for the other children.

 

Any one ever been in this situation just trying to get my head around the do and donts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No he doesn't need to have 1-1 before he can come to school and the nursery SENCO is correct you would be in breach of the DDA otherwise. Sorry been there ...my head provided TA cover from the school budget

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are not saying he cannot some in to school but the first 3 weeks of our transision with be different for him. THanks for clearing that up that myth what about special claim/pieces of law for our staff changing him any truth?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry if I wasn't clear what I meant was if you made different ruling to him starting school (part time or after a statement or the piece of paper people have told you about) to other children you would be in breach of the DDA. I wasn't suggesting you were refusing to let him start school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The child in my class needed to be changed frequently (sometime 5 or 6 times a day) and arrived with no support as her nursery had said she was fine. Unfortunately there is a big difference in spending 2hours in nursery to spending 6 and a half in school.

We got the statement just as she was leaving me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did your setting use the school action plus funding then for support. Did that child have someone for playtime and lunchtime assigned to them. Thanks for your help im clearer know. The nursery senco talked about him staying with them til he five is that allowed does anyone know?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No the support came directly from the school budget.(but different LAs fund SEN in different ways) No one stayed with her at lunchtime but lunchtime supervisors would send a message if they needed a member of staff to change her.

 

If the parents want him to stay in the nursery they can decide to do that as legally he doesn't need to start until the term after his fifth birth day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm really surprised that a senco would say a child with additional needs should be treated the same as all other children during transition. I would say that children with additional needs often require a unique transition process!?!

I would second what Marion has said about the DDA though. It is very clear about continence issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a child with autism a few yeas ago and had to make quite different transition arrangements for her which involved getting a some money to employ her one-to-one worker who would be working with her in school to come to work at our preschool for the summer term so that she became used to the child's triggers and the child got confident with her. They went into school for an hour every week together so the child could get more time familiarising herself with her new surroundings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the child has got inclusion funding at the min in the pre-school. THe problem is it 1 hour aday and the preschool is on site but commitee run so the adult with him at the min wont necessary get the job if/when the statment comes through. She brings him into the class and passes on messages and he uses our toilets etc. I just think we dont now if he will be fine in september or not do the move well so it needs to be flexible but SENCO said treat him no differently. I am positive he will be fine but aware he may not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It all sounds a bit 'hitty missy' to me. The lady who we got was the one employed by the school to start in September and we used transition funding to employ her at preschool in that transition time. I suppose you could do it the other way so the child is based in the building where he's most familiar to start the year off with and gradually increase school side of things. keep it as flexible as you can!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that you need to involve your area SENCO or whatever happens in your area, as I would be very concerned about how this transition is going to be managed. If he is working towards a statement what stage is he at? Surely there must be some specialist advice somewhere as he works though his action plans and reviews, especially as he is already getting some funding. I would ask for a meeting of all those involved to work out a strategy to make this as easy for him as possible. How do his parents feel about this?

The DDA is about protecting people, and would not allow for you to refuse the child, but would support you planning for his individual needs and expect you to design a suitable transition This would be positive discrimination. What seems to be being said about treating him the same is discriminatory, because you are not putting actions in place to help him have equal access. His needs should be met. One of the most difficult things for children/people with ASD is change, so to say that this child should be treated the same really concerns me. Transition should be treated with great sensitivity and lots of preparation, photographs of the new setting, visits, etc. etc. I would imagine a very good case could be made for this child to be supported in school by someone who is already doing so, and knows the child well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I meant by treating him the same as other children is his right to full time reception education with his peers not as the head has suggested. The transition has to be tailored to every child's needs and not to the needs of the school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is the nurserys areas senco who saying all this. As the school he is coming to I started going to the reviews after xmas and other agencies are involved. There has been lots of advice and made a book with photo that is used etc but now the question is what is going to happen without support if this statment does not come through - the assessment forms have just been issued so it is a possibilty if no delays. Parents suggested saying in preschool till support available what she was concerned about all aspects of school life and said basically he could never be left on his own and break and lunch was just as much of a concern. As he is not 5 til summer term she suggested staying in nursery. We all want this child to reach his potential but in true EYFS terms we have to address the PSED first. the nursery saw no reason as why they would stop meeting his potential.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see where everyone is coming from in this and there is no easy answer is there? I would be inclined to go with how the parents feel after listening to everyone else. I do know of a child who went to school in the am and Nursery in the pm as his parents needed full day care, and it was felt school would be too much all day initially. Then after Xmas he went full time in school and is doing well for himself. Perhaps adaptability is the way to go, with all concerned talking to each other along the way. Every child is different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thats is what the head has said tailored to his needs but we dont know til he starts whether he will be ok or find the change very hard

 

I had a little boy (ASD) in my class 3 years ago (2 in fact) who had a horrendous report from his day nursery pre starting school and I was really worried about him starting. His first visit he put his head in a bucket of water because he liked the sensory experience and the second he tried to cut his tongue with scissors (again the sensory thing). He arrived, no support just an observation visit from the ASD team. When they returned for the second visit 6 weeks later they struggled to pick him out from the rest of the class. I remember his mum crying she was so happy.

I guess I'm saying wait until you have time to get to know him and his needs before worrying.

 

Good Luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, unfortunately we share the same outdoor area, we are in nest room and we have had sessions cross phase and playtimes together due to many other things going on. I already know what he is like. I am positive about his start just hoping for words of advice to how best to help him. I ve got 2 other children at min with autism although major issues they are a walk in the park compared to my new challenge. Thanks for comments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go with your heart Sam and take each day as it comes. ASD is a challenge, but these children are so loveable and interesting. It is hard when you have so much to do with all the children but you can only do your best. Ask for support when you need it. You will be fine I'm sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At the end of the day we all want what is best for the children in our care. We have had several autistic children come through our school with varying severity. We have always been incredibly lucky in the way the parents have worked with us and we have worked out a slower transition. As parents they have always been aware of the challenges that they provide and know that in some children's cases without a 1;1 they are not just endangering themselves but others also. Saying that I have also been lucky that my school has always funded a 1:1 if we haven't had a statement and it is needed. Basically, work with the parents - afterall at the end of the day it is their choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

His first visit he put his head in a bucket of water because he liked the sensory experience

 

Good Luck

 

That really amused me Marion and reminded me of something. One day I was called upstairs by a supply teacher in Y3 who was having a problem with a boy we had with Aspergers. He was under her table with his head in the rubbish bin. I coaxed him out and asked him what he was doing. " I'm looking for a more condusive learning environment!" he replied. xD I've no idea how I kept my face straight :o

 

Apologies for hijacking the thread but children can be wonderful can't they?

(I only mentioned she was a supply teacher as that meant that she was a stranger to this child)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)