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Do You Log It?


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when you supervise a child having an inhaler do you record it. We have had an issue recenlty were a child has a care plan and has to have inhaler at a set time each day - a student in currently in the class and said the child had had inhaler child said he hadnt. When this was mentioned in staff meeting i said i though that we should be recording this not only to cover ourselves but also safety of children however our first aider said no it would be too much paper work. I just feel very sorry for this student who has been put in this position because of our inept system what do others do?

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we log it too.

Parents complete a 'long term' permission form for permanent/ongoing medication with all usual details of name of medication, dosage etc.

 

We have a designated storage for inhalers ( we have lots of them) all boxed and clearly marked with child's name (in addition to precription label). Inside each box we have a record sheet and all doses are recorded, date/time/by whom/signed and this is signed by parents on collection.

 

It doesnt create excess paperwork the sheet is kept with the inhaler and takes seconds to complete when inhaler is administered.

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as above we use a long term permission form for ongoing medications, if given during a session another form is completed and signed by whoever administers medication, 2nd witness signature and then parents signature on collection of child.

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It doesnt create excess paperwork the sheet is kept with the inhaler and takes seconds to complete when inhaler is administered.

What a good system, Geraldine! We only have a couple of inhalers so this would be a very practical solution for us. When the box is opened the practitioner will see the form and will remember to fill it in rather than having to go and search for the medicines book. Much more confidential, too!

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We record it- parents have to sign a form saying they give peremission for their child to be given the medication. At the bottom of this form there is a space where you date and sign to say when they were given it and by whom. So no extra paperwork really! dead simple, takes about 30 seconds if that. all forms are kept in a ring binder folder next to the cupboard where the medication is kept.

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In a school situation where the medication is given on a routine basis, we dont inform parents that child has had medication but I would expect to tell them if the child had had emergency doses. It is certainly not acceptable to be relying on the children to remember or on others.

What are the EYFS guidelines, Lola?

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i will have to check on the EYFS guidelines Sue. This happened in a year 1 class. At our school we dont adminstor medicine. Inhalers children do it themselves. I just feel so sorry for the teaching practice student who was put in this awful position

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At my school children administer inhalers themselves. As the inhalers are all kept in the medical room the adult who has taken them there still signs and dates to say the child had received it. Like Susan, when medicine is given on a routine basis, we dont inform parents that child has had medication but we would tell them if the child had an emergency dose.

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So, how are the medicines/ inhalers stored Lola? This throws up all sorts of issues re safety doesnt it, surely children dont have free access even in year 1?

You do need some sort of system to guard against missing or over dosing. I know in my school, they are signed off when they are given.

The teaching student can not be held up for not following safe practise if it doesnt exist nor can they be responsible if those issues have not been explained adequately to them.

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Asthma is a serious illness with the potential to go from bad to terrible within minutes.

 

If a child has an inhaler to use it should be easily accessible and not in an office somewhere else in the school/nursery.

 

The asthma site which can help answer all questions relating to asthma can be found HERE

 

They do a pack for schools and other publications for under 5's, they give advice on writing an asthma policy.

 

I was recently at a nursery with a little girl who was having an attack. It took 15 minutes for anyone to give her an inhaler. The NN with the child when I arrived had to check with the room leader, she then asked the manager, and then they phoned dad. She was given the inhaler but dad arrived to check on her and ended by taking her to hospital where they said she had a low oxygen level.

An inhaler cannot be given too many times. Even if she'd been given it by dad that morning you cant overdose on it.

 

I know that isnt the question you were asking but asthma scares me and too many people dont understand how dangerous it is.

 

Saying that, you should sign even if its so parents can see if it was needed more than normally, it could be an indication of worse to come or that the child needs other medication.

 

:o

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i completely agree with you Rea. Childrens inhalers are stored in a basket in each classroom in the infants - id children need it they ask the adult for it. The juniors keep their own inhalers with them. I just feel our school is far to slap dash about issues like these and i have btought it up at staff meeting (we have had a similar issue with suncream) but it seems until something serious happens i am banging my head against a brick wall. In my class this year i dont have a child with asthma however last year when i had a child who did i logged when they had their inhaler just to cover my own back.

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