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Children Understanding Their Rights


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I am currently working on my child protection assignment, for one of the tasks i have to plan a session for children aged 3-5yr olds that will focus on developing an understanding on their rights, as well as providing them with appropriate self- protection skill. I am stuck for ideas, can anyone help me out?

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There is a children's book called 'for every child' which was produced in association with unicef with some beautiful pictures from different children's illustrators.

 

 

 

It is easy to find on amzon!!

 

Essc

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I see it as giving children the right to say 'no' to an adult or to other children. We are too quick to tell children 'you must do what an adult says'. We tell children to give a kiss to people who they clearly dont want to kiss, so I think something to help parents see that children have a choice is also important, otherwise a refusal to kiss uncle Bert is seen as rude. Its also about not keeping secrets, we often tell children that the card they've made for Easter is a secret, a better word would be surprise. The NSPCC in conjuntion with someone called Triangle, used to do a book of pictures to use with CP issues. Some pages were too graphic for young children but some showed pictures of happy, sad, pushing away, that could be used alongside a puppet or teddy maybe. :o

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I think the concept for children that they have rights is very abstract for young children.

So as well as specific activities I see this as ongoing, adults role modelling respect for childrens rights, letting children have a voice, encouraging self esteem, self value, self confidence.

I agree surprise instead of secrets, adults to be encouraged to ask childrens permission before 'enforcing' kisses, ( this re-inforces that they have a choice to say no, and helps them practice their choice). Another example is when taking photo's of children, something we do on a daily basis, ask if they want you to.

During everyday play children have opportunities to voice their feelings, adults can watch carefully to see which children are less confident at this than others and help them by giving them the words / phrases to say ie: "Don't do that, I don't like it" (also teaches the other child respect for others). It's actually about letting children learn to be less conformist and to stand up for themselves. Also how to recognise that sense of danger.

 

Peggy

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  • 2 weeks later...
It's actually about letting children learn to be less conformist and to stand up for themselves. Also how to recognise that sense of danger.

I quite agree Peggy - many children these days get all their attention and praise for being 'good' and 'no trouble' whilst adults get on with their lives (especially whilst standing at the school gate chatting!). I think if we can give children the words they need (and the confidence to use them assertively) to stand up for themselves when they feel ignored or put upon, we'll be doing them a great service by developing their own skills to help keep themselves safe. Children being encouraged to please adults and do what they want/say without being able to think clearly about whether it is in their own (the child's) best interests could be a very dangerous thing indeed.

 

Teaching children to recognise and take heed of their own emotions is similarly very important - in terms of building their self esteem and self awareness, but also in recognising when they feel unsafe and uncomfortable.

 

Maz

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:( :wacko: xD

 

scaredycats or what????

 

I reckon children are more capable at 'sensing' risks than we often give them credit for. :o

 

following on from another recent topic, would you give a child a saw to saw wood with? xD

 

Peggy

 

p.s. No don't answer that, just save your comments for the relevant post. Just making a point on my soapbox again. :(:(

You do make me laugh with your wit you two Maz and Hali. :rolleyes:

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Just making a point on my soapbox again. xD:(

Well I do hope it is made of solid construction and you've carried out a suitable risk assessment before standing on it Peggy! :(

 

I'm still reeling from a visit from 'the powers that be' when my decision to have flowers in glass vases on the snack table was questioned "they are available in plastic you know" :o

 

Needless to say I put forward my view that children - when given the relevant advice and information - are very capable of taking the appropriate action to keep themselves safe (and of getting help and support if it goes wrong and they cut themselves!).

 

Sometimes I wonder if people say these things to me to test my reaction!

 

Maz

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Quote "Sometimes I wonder if people say these things to me to test my reaction!"

 

If that was the reason that would be ok, but what's scary is that these people actually don't understand where you are coming from. ( but then can you blame them xD:o )

 

 

Peggy

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