Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Woodwork!


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Our children had such fun with the pumpkin, hammer and tees that we are tentatively stepping into a bit of woodwork this week and I'm quite scared!! xD:o:(

 

I've bought some nails with big heads, a small hammer, a little saw with some spare blades (are they called fret saws?), some sandpaper and found a big slice of tree stump (think it was the stand for our christmas tree last year), a large plank and some smaller timber.

We will do this as an adult directed activity with one or two children at a time. We haven't got a workbench or a vice though so I thought we would do this in our outside area where we can put it on the grass or tarmac.

 

Please reassure me with some of your own experiences and ideas!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a workbench and full sized adult tools, saws, hammers, screwdrivers, drills, safety goggles etc and operate as a CI area for most of the time. In 3 years we haven't had so much as a sore finger. We find the children treat real tools with respect where in the past they could be "silly" with plastic/toy replicas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I echo Marion.We had a full woodwork bench for many years without mishap-vice& real tools.We had more trouble with parental worries.It eventually fell to pieces through over use.I'm afraid most parents are so protective today many children of our children have never held scissors xD let alone hammer in a nail.Of course ground rules have to be laid but I find children respond well to your trust.They will pick up if you are 'nervous'

The highlight for our last parents evening was when the 'materials' teacher highly praised my 13 year old daughter for her tool skills and sensible approach compared to her peers.So her dads tool box, balls of string and planks of wood she's played for years (without injury) have paid of.He's even recommended GCSE so I may get a new dinning table after all! :o

 

GO FOR IT!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My, just, 2 year old loves using his daddy's saw and hammer. The plastic ones just won't do! We tried giving him a smaller saw but he had a right paddy and insisted on the big one which he is using to cut the dead branches in the garden. He also loves screwdrivers and rakes and spades and anything else he shouldn't really have! We have also found him at the top of the old wooden step ladder that daddy was using to trim the 6ft hedges! I cannot take my eyes of him :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my son is a carpenter by trade, and he regularly gives his 3 year old daughter a battery operated, real, screwdriver to work with.She has her own supply of screws and wood and is actually extremely sensible with them........my heart nearly jumped into my mouth the first time i saw her checking the batteries were ok, by starting it off.Matt assured me she knows what she's doing....... :oxD and yet, I used to have the whole kit and caboodle at my old group, so what's my worry???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its like having a real plant i the room at children eye level they care for it more than a plastic one! thye have a beter understanding that they have to look after it!

WELL DNE LJW!

kids love realistic things and it also gives them that sense of I'm like mummy or daddy! with the real thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brilliant - a proper workbench and real tools etc are on my list - but its just finding room for it in the cupboard!

 

Old forks for holding nails in place while hammering are a good idea - keeps hands well out of the danger zone...

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This sounds brilliant :o the children also loved the hammering tees into pumpkin using 'real' hammers xD I was thinking nabout setting up the outside as builders/woodwork workshop.....would love to see any pics from someone already done this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)