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Hi all,

Wondered if anyone might be able to help me... I am a teacher working in Reception but have applied for a job as an early years advisor. I have an interview next Wednesday which I am really chuffed about :oxD but they have also asked for a 10 minute presentation on:

 

Work with staff in a non-maintained setting to set up and develop an area of provision.

Explain how you would do this taking into account the constraints that this type of setting may encounter.

 

If anyone out there has any ideas it would be greatly received (as without pinning my hopes up :( I really really want this job).

 

 

Thanks all!! :(:(

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Hi - don't know if this would help, but we are a non maintained setting, and some of our constraints are; premises is a church hall so need to set up and put away each day, can't leave anything up on the walls, extremely limited storage area, finances very tight rely heavily on fund raising and home made resources, staff are all part time, as are the children, area is carpeted and not easy to clean. How about setting up provision for role play, all staff would need to know what to set up each day, all children would need to have opportunitiy to play in it, resources must be able to be stored into the smallest possible space, and as for resources - imagine we have nothing but a few light weight portable screens, one small table and 2 chairs, what could you develop?

Is this the sort of thing you are looking for? If it is, and you need any further ideas, you can pm me and I'll let you know how we manage it.

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You could be in for a whole load of replies Tiggy!

 

I echo everything myhenroxanne says, given that we rent shared premises, need to pack away etc.

 

Given the emphasis on outdoor play in the new EYFS, how about the use of an outdoor area where we are not allowed to have outdoor play equipment such as climbing frames etc? We can't dig out there, the surface is part paved, part shingle and there is very little shade. The area has a low picket fence and is difficult to secure because we can't put up any permanent barriers or security gates etc. We have little storage space, but everything we use outside has to be packed back into the cupboard at the end of every session.

 

Maz

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I'm with HM on this one - with all the emphasis on outside play at the mo. Our contraints are that we just have a access to local rec grounds ...

we are not allowed to put up barriers,

footpath- well used runs through middle,

dog walkers, with most dogs running free.

we do have a sectioned off public playground but with 5 BIG slides/climbing frames not really suitable.

I would love someone to come and give us advice- but our EYP never really want to commit to advising us... with a blank statement of- 'do what you fell comfortable with' the answer to that is- if I felt 'comfortable' I wouldn't be asking for advise in the first place!!!!!

 

xxx

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Guest Wolfie

Another constraint that I have come across in full day care settings is the lack of opportunities for the staff to sit down as a team to discuss issues, ideas, practice, etc. There is never a time in the day, between 8am and 6pm, when all the staff can get together and this obviously makes communication very difficult. I have ended up introducing evening training sessions - although we have achieved a great deal in these sessions, it is not an ideal time and the length of the session is kept fairly short.

 

Hope this helps - I think effective staff communication and teamwork in full day care settings is a BIG issue.

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Hope this helps - I think effective staff communication and teamwork in full day care settings is a BIG issue.

And in sessional - we're never all in together so if we have after session meetings someone has to come in on their days off, working round school hours etc. Finding time to 'cascade' training in the limited time we have available is always tricky too.

 

Seems we're just never satisfied :o

 

Maz

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Bet you wished you'd never asked now.... :(

 

After seeing different provisions I'd have to agree that outdoor play and staff meetings are probably the 2 things most people could use help advice on.

Another one can be trips. People dont tend to have trips because of money and ratios, even small trips to the local shops or park can be fraught with dangers that people arent prepared to accept, even with a risk assessment. Throw in a nervous parent or staff memebr and you might as well lock the doors.

Also non-maintained settings tend to have a committee who hold the purse strings so staff might have to run things past them too. My old playgroup have to produce 3 prices for the committee to view if something is over £10.

 

Good luck with the interview :oxD

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Things I remember from my time on playgroup committee

 

When playgroup wanted to expand from 3 to 5 mornings the group who had the room for the other 2 would not budge.

 

Parent rota- do you use, how to manage, covering the parent that rushs off before the child is hardly in the door or just does't send the child.

 

Our outdoor area was tucked in the corner of the main park, vandalism was a constant battle.

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"Work with staff in a non-maintained setting to set up and develop an area of provision.

Explain how you would do this taking into account the constraints that this type of setting may encounter"

 

 

As you can see from replies, different settings have different issues, I think it is useful for advisors to consider that 'one cap doesn't fit all' ( I think that's the saying but I'm sure you know what I mean).

 

If I was making such a presentation I would include comment on:-

 

1/ awareness that non-maintained can be private, committee, co-operative etc, ie: various management structures which define how developments and systems are implimented.

 

2/ each setting has it's individual ethos / agenda's / hidden curriculum.

 

3/ use methods to enable the setting to identify themselves the areas requiring development, rather than stating a need which they have not yet recognised, thus enabling the 'idea' to come from them rather than you ( who maybe seen as an outsider)

 

4/ enable the setting to Include all 'stakeholders' ( staff/parents/children) in planning and implimenting change.

 

5/ awareness that each setting has different issues which can be seen by staff as barriers to change/development.

 

6/ awareness of the need to acknowledge their fears / feelings toward change, but also to enable and empower staff to consider 'thinking outside the box' toward positive change / development.

 

7/ awareness of the need to build relationships and gain staffs trust before embarking on enabling the setting to identify and make changes.

 

8/ identify the individual staffs levels of knowledge and understanding, and build from what they already know.

 

9/ As an early years advisor emphasis of provision will be on curriculum content relevant to FSC but also have consideration for BTTM and the iminent EYFS.

 

10/ Build your own bank of ideas and resources ( including low or nil cost) to share with providers, examples of other settings successes / good practice ie: the real world rather than text book / theory. Enable communication between settings ie: My early years advisor felt that my natural world resources are a good example of good practice and organised an 'open afternoon' for other practitioners to visit my setting. Other local settings have done the same.

 

11/ Praise every achievement however small. Motivation.

 

12/ don't make assumptions. Work from the information that the settings inform you of regarding constraints, but also be aware that some practitioners can be 'blind' to some issues, that you may recognise ( as an outsider looking in) that they haven't.

 

13/ be aware that some 'habits die hard' - dinosaur syndrome, "always done it this way so why change". or "Ofsted says it's ok".

( brings you back to Numbers 3 & 4 )

 

14/ awareness that some settings are eagerly looking for ways to develop and improve and spend lots of time making changes, ( often too often) but then don't allow time for changes / developments to imbed themselves, or don't have the skills to review and evaluate the effectiveness of change. Plus settings may need support in actually developing skills to be able to identify, plan, organise, co-ordinate and impliment change. Consider if there is a need for workshop training in your area on these skills.

 

15/ acknowledge the need for good communication skills and management skills to enable change. Barriers can be due to physical environment, lack of resources ( people, time, space and equipment) financial, attitudes and knowledge and skills.

 

16/ Barriers can be broken or reduced and positive attitudes = positive results. xD

 

apologies if some of my statements are 'telling you how to suck eggs', just noting thoughts as they arise. :o I'm sure there are other aspects you could include in your presentation. My comments are broad rather than specific to any one particular setting.

 

Have you had personal experience of implimenting development of an area of provision? If yes, use this experience as an example.

 

GOOD LUCK WITH THE INTERVIEW. :( Let us know how you get on.

 

 

Peggy

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,

Just wanted to say a big thank you for all your comments they were really useful. I was able to think about your problems and constraints and try to find some sort of solution. As far as the job goes for the position of Early Years Advisor..I didnt get it unfortunately. ALthoug they were impressed with the presentation, there was one question which in hindsight I knew I had not answered fully enough. Oh well, never mind! Back to the classroom!! :o

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Sorry to hear you weren't succesful this time, you sound quite positive though and I am sure ( as you have mentioned) that you have gained from the experience. Good luck in any future applications.

 

Peggy

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