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Identify Any Obstacles ?


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Hi everyone for the first time. This question is for my NVQ 3 CCL&D option 317 Work with families to enhance their children's learning and development. Identify any obstacles to families involvement with children's learning and development and discuss the options available?Any ideas of obstacles that may occur? & Options available?. Am on the the right track with parents work commitments and time for child ? Maybe introduce storysack or book to share together to encourage involvement. Or have I misssed the point & totally on the wrong track.? Please if anyone can help .I have only got 1 unit left after this one then I am finished .Thanks soooo much.

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I'm not familiar with the standards here, but might it also include things like English as a second/additional language or parental learning needs/disability, etc ?

 

And welcome aboard!

 

Sue

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Nothing to add really, but some families just dont want to get involved, they see that stuff as your job, and some would like to but honestly havent got the time.

 

 

And welcome from me too :oxD

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Two good responses already so just wanted to say HELLO and good luck with your studies. :o

just had a thought, under the Every Child Matters, 5 outcomes, Economic wellbeing, poverty could be an obstacle too, so advice for parents would be on the lines of Childcare funding, tax credits, income support etc.

 

Peggy

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Hi and welcome

 

What about 'fear of people (they see as) in authority. Their own dislike of school. Feeling very shy or intimidated by practitioners? Lack of self confidence in their parenting abilities?

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Hi

I am due to start my ccld 3 next month, so I could be barking up the wrong tree but my thoughts on yours are

 

 

Parents have learning difficulties, or just are unable to understand what is required.

child comes from split family so each half believes it is the others responsibility,

child could be parents main carer,

siblings affecting bed times, disrupted sleep, have to entertain.

lives in a place where peace/concentration is difficult.

 

Good Luck

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Maz -

 

That's a really good one! never considered that before :o

I just remember how I felt when my first baby went to pre-school - I felt so inadequate that I was sure the staff thought I was a complete simpleton, so got in and out of there as quickly as I could. As it was, I didn't realise until years after that this was probably as a result of post-natal depression, and the lovely ladies there really looked after me, and set me on the train to what I laughingly call my career in childcare.

 

Maz

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I just remember how I felt when my first baby went to pre-school - I felt so inadequate that I was sure the staff thought I was a complete simpleton, so got in and out of there as quickly as I could. As it was, I didn't realise until years after that this was probably as a result of post-natal depression, and the lovely ladies there really looked after me, and set me on the train to what I laughingly call my career in childcare.

 

Maz

 

Thanks so much everyone,great ideas .I had thought of parents language and learning too.Its just so hard when trying to reflect on my own practice & how I dealt with and resolved the problem.What fab ideas .Cheers everyone.Thanks for welcome.

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Welcome from me too :o

 

what about children who bite etc we had a mum who always felt that others were talking about her etc (even though we never named her child, the other children would come in and point out who had done it) she found it hard to be around the other parents regardless of how much support we gave her, and no matter how much we watched her child they always seemed to sneak in a crafty nibble!. She always wanted to dash in and out as quickly as possible.

and parents who see no wrong in their own children (i know that sounds a bit harsh xD )

but we had another child who also used to hit others, it got quite bad at times, but if we spoke to mum she always had a reason, saying 'he told me that so and so did it first' or 'he was hungry' even when we observed his behaviour it was if she didnt believe us, she truly believed that everyone else was at fault.

 

Jo

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Welcome from me too :o

 

what about children who bite etc we had a mum who always felt that others were talking about her etc (even though we never named her child, the other children would come in and point out who had done it) she found it hard to be around the other parents regardless of how much support we gave her, and no matter how much we watched her child they always seemed to sneak in a crafty nibble!. She always wanted to dash in and out as quickly as possible.

and parents who see no wrong in their own children (i know that sounds a bit harsh xD )

but we had another child who also used to hit others, it got quite bad at times, but if we spoke to mum she always had a reason, saying 'he told me that so and so did it first' or 'he was hungry' even when we observed his behaviour it was if she didnt believe us, she truly believed that everyone else was at fault.

 

Jo

Have you been reading my life story Jo? This used to be me, too! I'd get the slight nod of the head from the Supervisor and then she'd sidle up to me and tell me that my lovely daughter - yet again - had scratched or bitten her 'best friend'. I just wished the ground would open up and swallow me. We had long talks about what we should be doing about it - they were incredibly supportive. But I always wanted to get out of there quick, and would then cry all the way home.

 

This went on well until these two girls were in Year one. The other girl's mum (who in other ways was a good friend) would be forever pointing out the error of my daughter's ways - whilst never acknowledging that (in the words of their teacher) was very much a situation of "six of one and half a dozen of the other). I still ashamed that I didn't stick up for my daughter and point out that it wasn't always her fault, but at the time I wasn't as assertive as I am now...

 

When you're cringing with the embarrassment and shame of being a useless parent its hard to be fully involved in the life of the pre-school and your child's education.

 

Maz

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Hi Maz

 

i hope you dont feel my last post was a criticism

i really feel for you... i used to have a good friend (only lost touch because she moved away nearly 18 years ago!) our boys were two when we met and her son used to bite etc all the time. i remember one instance when we went to toddlers, i had to leave early and then she didnt turn up for a couple of weeks. When i saw her she told me all the other mums had turned their backs on her and no one spoke to her for the rest of the session xD we kept in touch for ages and i really felt for her, it could so easily have been my son...she used to bite him back! :o

 

so when we had this instance at preschool i thought back to my friend and was really supportive of this mum, and understood how hard it was for her to be fully involved with preschool, we really tried to help her understand that we didnt blame her or her child no matter what anyone else said..... after all they are only children.

 

Its so hard sometimes being a parent, mine are growing up now but its not getting any easier

 

Jo

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I, too, had a son who used to bite....we joke now that the reason we had to leave Leeds was because he had no-one left to bite in Yorkshire and it was time to move on!! I, too, used to cringe with embarrassment and want the ground to swallow me up - I could just feel other parents thinking that their child would NEVER do that....or perhaps they were just thanking their lucky stars that it WASN'T their child, I'll never know! :o

 

Anyway, he's nearly 19 now and has stopped biting....quite a nice lad really!! Different problems to deal with now.......A level results day not a good one in our house........but hey, all part of being a parent, eh?!?! xD

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I just remember how I felt when my first baby went to pre-school - I felt so inadequate that I was sure the staff thought I was a complete simpleton, so got in and out of there as quickly as I could. As it was, I didn't realise until years after that this was probably as a result of post-natal depression, and the lovely ladies there really looked after me, and set me on the train to what I laughingly call my career in childcare.

 

Maz

 

It seems that quite a few of us have taken that route into this great career! You're right, Maz, pre-school staff are often caring and supportive rather than judgmental - I put this down to quite a large extent to the ethos that prevails within the Pre-school Learning Alliance, who used to provide most training in that sector. Certainly, when I took over the pre-school I remembered how I'd felt as a newbie mum, especially with my little bundle of mischief that was child 2! It makes you far more understanding of both children who present challenges and their families, which is even more important in those circumstances.

 

All the skeletons are coming out of the closet, now...see, you weren't alone! :o

 

Sue

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I can echo Sue's remarks about the PLA, their ethos has always been one of supporting parents, which was lucky for me too. Only a few months ago my youngest told me about some of things he used to do at playgroup, pushing friends down the slide, taking the chair someone was just about to sit on so they landed on the floor, scribbling on someones work. He said he didnt know why he did it just that he felt like it at the time. Good job they were supportive people, until I started working there at the same time and could give him a telling off. He's also turned out well so a lot of these childish problem do go, it just doesnt feel at the time like they ever will. :oxD

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Hi Maz

 

i hope you dont feel my last post was a criticism

Not at all Jo - I'm just one of those annoying people who seems to be able to relate lots of things to personal experiences! Not that I'm laying down any sort of challenge though! :o

 

I think it does help me though when talking to parents - I am usually able to tell them I know how it feels to be where they are now. And seeing things from both sides helps too - whether your child is the biter or bitten.

 

Maz

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I can echo Sue's remarks about the PLA, their ethos has always been one of supporting parents, which was lucky for me too. Only a few months ago my youngest told me about some of things he used to do at playgroup, pushing friends down the slide, taking the chair someone was just about to sit on so they landed on the floor, scribbling on someones work. He said he didnt know why he did it just that he felt like it at the time. Good job they were supportive people, until I started working there at the same time and could give him a telling off. He's also turned out well so a lot of these childish problem do go, it just doesnt feel at the time like they ever will. :oxD

I think the thing about the PLA was that originally it was mums doing something for themselves and their children. So they never forgot where they had come from. Most typical "PLA-ers" started off by getting involved in their children's group, joined committees, went on training and subsequently found themselves with proper careers. I'm not so sure this organic philosophy and approach is so evident today (certainly not in our area where we have no PLA branch any more), but the ethos is still at the heart of the most successful pre-school groups I know.

 

Maz (ex PLA employee!)

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