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Staffing Delivery Of The Foundation Stage Curriculum


Wolfie
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This may seem like a very simple question with an obvious answer! I am battling at the moment to ensure that the staff at a full day care (8-6) nursery I support deliver the Foundation Stage curriculum for funded children consistently and regularly every day, in two 2.5 hour sessions. There is an "identified" member of staff to lead delivery of the curriculum within a room for 2-5s but the shift system means that sometimes she doesn't start work until 10am (when the first session starts at 9am) and at lunchtimes she may be having her lunch when the second session should start.

 

The attitude is...well, if she's not there then the Foundation Stage doesn't happen until she's back again. I'm not joking! I've tried to impress upon the management that when Ofsted turn up they will expect the funded children to be receiving their entitlement regardless of who is staffing the room and that it's fine to have an experienced member of staff leading on provision of the Foundation Stage curriculum but that EVERYONE in the room should be working together to plan and provide it; however, I get so many staffing difficulties thrown at me that I'm feeling increasingly exasperated. Surely it's just a matter of working as a team, ensuring that the planning is shared and understood by all and providing support to any individuals who feel unsure of anything. Has anyone else encountered the same difficulties and attitude?

 

I won't be beaten! There are thousands of good settings out there who work with the same set of circumstances and staffing issues - tell me what you do! I feel that really it's the attitude of the team of staff that I need to work on as the lack of any really effective teamwork impinges on every other aspect of the running of the nursery, as you can imagine.

 

HELP!

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They are actually not alone Wolfie and I'd beg to differ that Ofsted will even pick up on it.

 

I am in a really lovely community DN.

The children arrive anytime between 7.30 and 10. But it's not until 10 that ANY BTT or FS work is done. Until then all the children are lumped together until the rest of the staff arrive to go to their respective rooms. Only then are any plans followed but even then we have to get snack out of the way which can be 20 minutes.

At 11.30 we tidy up have a story/songs or talk about what we've been doing and then have lunch at 11.45.

After lunch all the children go outside while various staff have lunch and dont go back in until 2pm when they have another snack.

The core children go at 3 or just after but there are no planned activities until that time.

They recently received good and outstanding in their report.

 

Good luck swimming against the tide.

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Gosh Rea that sounds quite comical when you put it like that.

 

Wolfie - the manager needs to look at getting more of the room staff trained in FS - although it sounds like you're banging your head against a brick wall!!

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Hi Wolfie, is this the same setting as your other post??

 

Really don't have the time now, but please PM, or I'll PM you, because I have loads to add, or at least, loads of comments!!

 

Sue

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As you say, all staff should be involved in planning to meet the individual needs of children so that they understand what the learning intentions are or how to support children's creative thinking.

 

But as we know, what should happen and what does happen can be two different things. I symathise. In our setting, some staff seem reluctant to embrace equality of opportunity/access for all children in practice even though we have an equal opportunites policy.

 

We see such good practice on this site, but trying to get everybody on board on even fundamental things can be hard work.

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May I ask are you concerned about 'getting through Ofsted' or actually the childrens everyday quality of experiences?

 

The reason I ask is that one of the reasons I got an inadequate 4 yrs ago is that a member of staff who worked with the younger BTT children, when asked by an Inspector What learning intentions is that activity ( re: the main room) she said, I don't know I work with the younger ones :o The fact that she only worked with the younger ones during FSC storytime and the rest of the session all age groups are together didn't cross her mind, she catagorised herself just for the younger ones.

This particular staff member and 2 others left shortly after the inspection.

 

Do you have a keyworker system? surely this role entails ensuring the 'key' child/ren accesses the curriculum.

 

I agree FSC training and some monitoring system , with consistent feedback to ensure job descriptions are met. Are adult obs done? Maybe the less able can do some peer obs on staff more able, then vice versa.

 

Peggy

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Hi Peggy

 

Ofsted are really very low down on my personal list of priorities but, for once they did me a "favour" by flagging up issues that I had been trying to raise ever since I started supporting the setting......I now have a piece of paper that gives a bit of weight to my arguments and ideas!

 

A keyworker system is in place "in theory" but I am running an evening training session in a couple of weeks time to completely overhaul the practice from 0-5 and introduce the idea of a "key person" (read Peter Elfer's book to learn more and understand the distinction between keyworker and key person) approach and discuss observations and assessments. I am following that up with a second training session a month later which focusses more on the planning in the 2-5s room....I KNOW that assessments and planning can't really be separated but I need to make the sessions manageable and only have an hour at each session!

 

Teamwork, teamwork, teamwork is to be my central theme at both sessions! It is sadly lacking and with it any good communication and morale amongst the staff. The attitude that the two members of your staff seemed to have is much more widespread and needs to be worked upon consistently!

 

Sue R, I've PMd you!

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I run a full daycare nursery too, open 8-6 51 weeks a year. Our early educatilon sessions are at set times, 9.30 - 12 and 1 - 3.30. Staffing is arranged around these sessions, so all foundation stage practitioners are working by 9.30. In the afternoon, it does mean that a member of staff is on her lunch break for an hour of the session, but the other two practitioners can start the session supported by a staff member who covers lunches. I think its really important that the whole team is encouraged and supported in being able to deliver the curriculum. What about planning so that the times when your foundation stage leader is not around are covered by simple, easy-to-cope-with activities, until staff become more confident? Always easier said than done, I know!

 

mary-mary

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