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Continuous Provision In A 2-5s Room


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I want to help a full day care nursery "revamp" their planning and practice concerning the continuous provision in their room because the provision seems very haphazard and unplanned and I get the feeling that the staff feel that unless they're involved in an "adult directed, focus activity" they really don't have to become involved in the children's play at all. Apart from sand and water, which do you consider to be the most important areas of continuous provision in a setting for this age group? Under which headings do you decide what will be provided? The room isn't the biggest and I would say that 4-5 distinct areas is probably feasible. Do you change/rotate the areas available if you have space restrictions?

 

All ideas welcome!

Edited by Wolfie
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I get the feeling that the staff feel that unless they're involved in an "adult directed, focus activity" they really don't have to become involved in the children's play at all.

 

Good luck with this one too :o

 

Currently working with a very lazy person who sits and, well thats it.

 

I dont think you can beat paint, preferably on an easle but table top if you have no choice. Loads of paper always available in different shapes, colours and sizes. Preferably with loads of paint colours available.

Home corner with home stuff, and paper and pens. I hate it when its a hospital with some random leaflets and rolls of bandages, and no pens because 'we're not doing writing' Honestly, that was said to me once.

Fine motor area, jigsaws are always good for having a chat over, threading, dough, board games or other small group or pairs games.

Glue and boxes with loads of collage stuff, but next to the paint so they can mix their ideas.

Book corner with books that are changed often. I hate being bored.

Construction, duplo, stikkle bricks etc but changed often so theres no boredom.

I like anywhere that allows freedom of movement.

On a visit to my old playgroup I saw a child manipulate a piece of dough, walk to the sand and roll the dough in it and then go to the home corner and put the dough in a pan on the cooker.

So many nurseries dont allow that freedom. The dough mustnt get messed up, the home corner stuff shouldnt get dirty.

As with your other query, good luck.

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Apart from sand and water, which do you consider to be the most important areas of continuous provision in a setting for this age group? Under which headings do you decide what will be provided?

All ideas welcome!

 

In my last nursery we had workshop/bay areas for:

  • mark making
  • construction
  • sand/water
  • art/craft/junk modelling
  • maths
  • home corner and/or role play
  • table top area for malleable, jigsaws, group games, small world

I couldn't say which one would be more important, but some could be combined if space was an issue.

I'd use some tabletop space that could be used for multipurpose activities - malleable, jigsaws etc. Don't forget that the outdoors is a classroom too....!!

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Thanks for that Running Bunny........outdoors is on my "jobs" list! It's just been a matter of "Where do I start?"!! :o

 

Getting started outdoors....

Start with the most important people - the children!

Carry out observations of what they are currently doing - is it adult-led/child-led, do the children wait for the adults to take the lead or do they take their own initiative?

What is the mix of boys and girls? Do they play together or obviously separate into two groups?

What resources are availalbe to them? Do the staff take the indoors outside? If not,why not? Do they play out in all weathers? (At GMEX on Saturday I went to a seminar with Laura Henry who writes in nursery world and she said that there is no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing!)

Speak to the children, use photographs of all the resources that are indoors and get them to order what they would like to take outside, older ones could 'design' zones to play in (wet, role play, ride-on etc)

Speak to the staff - what are their expectations of outdoor play (and if it's just to have a chat, you have my express permission to shoot them xD ) What do the staff enjoy doing - running games, treasure hunts, mark making, sitting down reading stories...

See how close the expectations of the staff match up with what the children actually enjoy doing.

Get signed up to Learning Through Landscapes quick smart!

 

Sorry, gone off on one there, but I'm an outdoor chick and can't bear to see such a wonderful opportunity wasted! GOOD LUCK!!

Edited by Running Bunny
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I'm with you all the way with the outdoors, Running Bunny...already signed up with Learnign Through Landscapes! What I actually meant with "Where do I start?" is that there are so many different aspects of the nursery to work on that it's difficult to prioritise and decide what to work on first and I've decided to tackle the indoor learning zones first!

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Oh, Outdoors is just my favourite!!

 

ALL the children become engaged, even those that can become 'challenging' inside. You should most certainly do as much as you can to develop that! We have designated areas as inside in our setting. (But of course, they can mix!!)

 

Sue

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We're really hoping to get an outdoor area very soon. It has been discussed endlessly over the past couple of years but finally looking like a reality. I am really excited - it will be so much better than the cold hall. :o

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