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How Many Meetings Can Parents Request?


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Just wondering about how many meetings can a parent request and how often to discuss child's progress? I thought the statutory was twice a year as well. as a written report - Obviously more often for parents of children with SEN as IEPs are due. However, a parent with diagnosed 'problems' is requesting meetings with a variety of staff on an almost daily basis - is the parent entitled to this or should we be firm? we have accommodated the needs up to now but can not keep giving up the time to dedicate to feedback of one child in this way - any advice greatly appreciated

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Personaly I would say that the parent should be given the time they need. Not clear about who has the diagnosed problems, parent or child? Can you direct this parent to one member of staff, the childs key worker maybe? A happy parent usually means a happy child. I have always been lead to believe that we are there for the family not just the child, although in a busy nursery I can see how this can be difficult. Good luck :D

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I agree, though I can understand how wearing this can be.Why not suggest that a daily diary will be kept(maybe the parent can do one too??) and you get together once a week to discuss how the child is doing?/This could take the pressure off a bit, explaining to the parent that things don't really change much on a daily basis and that of course, should something urgent crop up, then you will discuss it with her immediately.You could then take this to fortnightly, then monthly and then Half-termly,discussions.A bit of a "weaning" process, but if you have an anxious parent, this will rub off on the child, so I guess patience is going to be key here.

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We dont put a limit on the number of times a parent can come in to discuss their child. We opperate an open door policy for parents and see this as part of working with parents.

We only do written reports once a year and 'formal' parents evenings twice a year.

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Yes, we do the same, Marion. Last year I had a particularly needy parent and not only did she request numerous meetings (with various memebers of staff) but also spent an inordinate amount of time lurking inside and outside my classroom during the school day! The child was actually perfectly fine - it was the parent who needed the support :o All is fine now and we are very happy we were able to meet this parent's needs.

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Guest tinkerbell

Sometimes too the parents can be suffering from depression or something...I had one a 8 years ago who would not let up on me, she took the child to the car grilled him and then marched him back in or gave me letters.I spent long sessions listening to her and finally asked the HT to be in on the meetings as I felt so drained.........it finally came out from her husband that she had had a stillbirth and was suffering from depression.

So advice would be have someone in with you jotting down notes (have a paper trail)

Tinkerbell

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Thanks for the advice everyone -we are jotting notes, etc and meeting daily and keeping a diary we send home to the parent and having meetings between staff involved in situation/ external agencies too -it's really hard to maintain the current level of thoroughness though - we can only do our best can't we ? Just hope it eases off a bit soon - maybe referring to the parent to one named member of staff may help as suggested, we are having to make sure we all say the same thing at the moment as the parent approaches all staff with the same questions quite often - any other strategies or ideas welcome

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