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Treasure Baskets


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Hi all,am hoping to introduce my team to treasure baskets and the benefits for the babies in our setting -Does anyone have any info or links for this kind of thing ? Thanks

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Guest DeborahF

Featherstone Education do a lovely book of ideas for Treasure Baskets - guess what it's called...The Little Book of Treasure Baskets!.....with some introductory info and lots of suggestions. If I was better at IT I'd do you a link, I'm sure someone else will do it for you but the website is www.featherstone.uk.com.

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Treasure baskets are great!

 

Lots of different textures that can be gained through 'real' objects as opposed to lots of plastic things which may look different but all feel similar (e.g. plastic spoons, platic cups and platic plates in role play for example) great for children with SEN also - decribing, preference.

 

Are great for home school links as parents are always keen to add to the baskets

 

:D:D:D

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you could try the NCB they have great info on treasure baskets and heuristic play i got a video from there a few years ago that i still use today for new staff and to give to parents very straightforward and informative x

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Lola, don't worry, we are all here to share knowledge and worries.

 

Treasure baskets are collections of items for exploration. They are usually made of natural materials, and can be themed. They should ideally be just placed for the children to explore as they will, either in a basket (if big and accessible enough) or laid out on a rug or blanket.

 

A great favourite with our pre-school at the moment is the Brush Basket - yes, brushes of all sorts, just waiting to be explored!! Obviously, for the different age groups there will be different contents.

 

We store the basket contents in big draw-string bags, as the budget can't run to sooo many baskets - neither have we storage!

 

Sue

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As someone higher up this thread said Sally Featherstone has done a Little Book of Treasure Baskets full of very good ideas.

I put all sorts in mine depending on the theme. in fact when my grandson comes I make one up for him to play with. When he came at half term we collected cones, leaves, nuts, and conkers and he had a wonderful time playing with them. They look very good sitting next to my fireplace.

Rosie will be 6 months at Xmas- i thought I'd make one for her as a pressie- any ideas for such a young baby?

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http://www.montessorimagazine.com/magazinebody19.html

 

http://www.walesppa.org/en/smalltalk/5/treasure-baskets

 

http://www.treasurebasket.org.uk/

 

hope these help

 

This site is dedicated to Elinor Goldschmied who 'invented' treasure baskets and might be of interest

http://www.infantsatplay.com/

Edited by Marion
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hello :)

i know plastic is not normaly thought of for a treasure basket but I made up a basket of plastic lids; from coffee jars, oxo jars etc. Large lids that can be washed and no odour left, when you get lots of colours and shapes in one basket they love it lots of scope for sorting and stacking as they get older, and then putting other things in them etc. Also the older boys like the jam lids that pop in and out.

sqpeg

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Now I know what to do with all those lids that seem to lose their 'bottom halves' :DxD

 

The concept of Treasure baskets reminds me of my favourite activity as a child over a span of at least 5 years. My mum had a small set of 3 draws, they were on the side of her singer sewing machine, remember with the foot peddles and side belt which turned the wheel, no sign of electricity anywhere. :o . In the draws were all sorts of bits and bobs, I can almost visualise them now. :D

I spent ages getting all the items out and exploring them, sorting them and adding to them. :D

 

Part of the fascination was the opening of the draws to see what ws hidden from view and what had changed since last I looked. :)

 

Peggy

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Not really on topic, I know, but sqpeg's post reminded me.

 

When I did my PEEP training (was it really 8 months ago!!) an activity was used where a variety of lids had pictures on the inside of them, covered with sticky-backed plastic. It could be toys, objects, the children or staff - anything! It made a different sort of Treasure Basket and I thought it was wonderful - so have those children I have tried it on!

 

Sue

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Bottle tops are good for sorting activities - pour them into your tuff spot and stand back!

Someone on the TES forum has posted a wonderful bottle top picture on the resource bank - I dare not post it here for fear of copyright infringement, but it's worth checking out.

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