Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Which Is Your Organisational Culture?


beth1
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, I am just about to start my Personal Development and Management Module. To help me get started with some inspration, can i ask you what type of organisational culture is your setting and why you think is it so? The Cultures are;

power- faith in indviduals, taking risks, judgemental by success,

role-flow of power, clearly defined job roles,

task- project orentation, strong on teamwork, time spend on reporting

person - indivduuals are the foucus, competive behaiour,

 

If it is a mix of all four please tell me how it works, I am needing all the help I can get, we as a class are stuggling to get a grasp of understanding of how the FDey works and how to complete portfolios, study tasks etc. Worst of all they are telling us that we have weeks to complete tasks, well I wonder how that works if we have an study task of Developing Child 1 to hand in just before christmas, thats around 8 weeks away once we have been told how to set the study task out!

 

 

Thank you for all you help in advance.

 

 

Beth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beth - that sounds like some strange foreign language you're learning there.

 

where would you place: love, trust, respect, professionalism?

 

I think the most successful places are those that don't subscribe to managementspeak and concentrate on treating everyone as an individual with something to offer whether they are 8weeks old or 88 years old and everyone in between and beyond.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beth what a complicated method. I would say that a combination of all. any one of the scenarios would make a very difficult place to work and be in personal development and management skills.

On the 1st one power I would take out and use

faith in individuals mixed in with a bit of judgemental by success.

2nd one role I would say a bit of both evenly otherwise ends up in a dictatorship!!!! :D

3rd task again a bit of all three to get a good balance

and the same for 4th

on the first one it would depend on each personality of the risk taking. some people are just not risk takers but that doesn't mean they can't develop personally or in their management skills.

We do personality tests and you can't change a person in what is fundamentally their own traits. Don't know if you want to do some research on it it is called a Belbin test as he was the one that invented and theorised the concept of personality traits as I understood it. All I know is that I'm not a finisher as I like to get things going but like other people to finish things off for me, which works quite well at work as my staff are very good at finishing things that I start. I give them the ideas and they put them into practice. but if there was to many like me in the team it would be a night mare. xD:(

I agree with androyd though where's the love and respect and trust in all of those others, with out love and respect and rust the world won't go far but into war!!!!! :o good luck in your research

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine is a bit lasai fair ( sorry totally wrong spelling, a french term i think)

What will be will be, spontaneous and not too serious in terms of hiearchy of management personelle. :D

 

Looking at your types I am a bit of all 4, more democratic than autocratic but basically, like children, I don't really fit into any specific box, and wouldn't want to. :o

 

I remember looking at organisational culture styles in my past studies, it is very difficult to get your head around. The people who wrote these 'styles' and their interpretations were not in the vocational / service field of business, need I say more. xD

 

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

Beth - that sounds like some strange foreign language you're learning there.

 

where would you place: love, trust, respect, professionalism?

 

I think the most successful places are those that don't subscribe to managementspeak and concentrate on treating everyone as an individual with something to offer whether they are 8weeks old or 88 years old and everyone in between and beyond.

 

 

Androyd love the comment, it is a bit like learning a forgien language, but this is what is expected when you do an Foundation Degree or even any Degree. xD

 

Part of the assessment is to look at this type of organisation and talk about it, I would rather talk about what Peggy is saying, but the idea in the Foundation Degree is that you are becoming a relective practioner and a nursery manager all at the same time.

 

 

Beth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

Androyd love the comment, it is a bit like learning a forgien language, but this is what is expected when you do an Foundation Degree or even any Degree. xD

 

Part of the assessment is to look at this type of organisation and talk about it, I would rather talk about what Peggy is saying, but the idea in the Foundation Degree is that you are becoming a relective practioner and a nursery manager all at the same time.

Beth

 

 

I agree with Sue R comment :D

 

Beth, what I am talking about is what you are studying, it's just different jargon, once the jargon is overcome / translated then the knowledge gained, ie: various management styles, can be reflected upon.

I suppose what I am saying is get past the jargon, understand the theory then relate it to your practice and reflect upon it. = you can'e reflect upon it until you 1/ understand what you are reflecting upon and 2/ have experienced it to be able to reflect on it. :(xD:(:( :wacko:

 

all this thinking, and at half term ( or should I say end of term 1)

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

Androyd love the comment, it is a bit like learning a forgien language, but this is what is expected when you do an Foundation Degree or even any Degree. xD

 

 

Beth

 

Sorry Beth I totally disagree, what is expected of any degree is to get past the jargon and analyse the facts. Jargon is often used make things far more complicated than they actually are. The trick is to translate it into something meaningful then use this as the base for discussion. Yes you have to write in an academic style for yout asignments but dont mistake jargon for academia.

 

Sorry jargon is a pet hate! :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry Beth, it's just that I have suffered from someone who had all the high powered technical terms for management, and when talking about good practice sounds brilliant, but when it comes down to putting it into practice, all the high-minded theoretical models meant nothing.

 

What matters is what people do that works and I worry that too many practitioners are being encouraged to get caught up in jargon and lose sight of what it all means.

 

It concerns me that the people designing 'Foundation Degrees' and 'leadership' courses concentrate on this guff - thinking up posh and complicated language to describe how human interactions can take place - how people can use and abuse power - it's a very important subject and it's important to think about as a manager, but it shouldn't be buried in spurious jargon.

 

A long time ago I was working for a businessman and I suggested I should do a course in business studies.

'Why on earth would you want to do that?', he remarked surprised.

'So I can become better at running the business.'

'If the people running the course were any good at running a business, they wouldn't be running a course, they'd be successful businessmen.'

Good managers don't need complicated models and jargon to describe what they do - they just get on with it and the job of academics who run these courses should be to describe what makes a successful manager in simple language.

What makes the EPEE research so powerful is that it states very clearly what things in practice make a huge difference to children's learning. They have done so in a striaghtforward way which most people can understand. It's sad that more can't be done this way.

 

Bit of a rant, sorry. :oxD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally agree with Marion, androyd and just about everyone else! Jargon is absolutely no help when you are studying and learning new skills. What you need is straightforward language. We have a rich and vibrant one, capable of delivering many nuances of meaning, so let's use it!!

 

Sorry, that's my rant over :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

funny that androyd should mention the eepe research,

as a mentor of a student doing the degree this is just what has been applied to the students for their reflective practioner modules ,

I have to observe and give a report on the student using this as a model for the report as does her tutor at uni,

her assignments on reflective practitioner include the use of an accreditation scheme used locally to be used as a basis for this, and seem to be free of the jargon and do actually reflect on her work with us having to use parents, or children for research and input into the module,

seems every area or uni has its own way of completing the degree.

 

Inge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)