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HI

 

we are expecting a visit soon apparently (not sure how our director knows this, but she is adament they will come soon)

two questions,

 

firstly when ofsted arrive i assume they tell you who they are and show you some ID? ~ what ID is it (ie is it a badge round their neck etc...) and how do you make it clear that you are checking tehir ID without appearing to be too overscrupulous (if that is even a word????)....

obviously i want ofsted to know that we are 'vetting' who comes into the nursery... but is it appropriate to just glance and the badge and then welcome them in...

(did any of that make sense)

 

secondly i have only been manager two and a bit months, and things are still rather new to me, would ofsted be patient of that. I mean i know about the 14 national standards, the 5 outcomes of every child matters, and the FS and BT3... plus obviusly day to day things in the nursery. but things like funding, child protection issues etc are still new to me... so what will ofsted expect me as manager to know, and what are they likely to be asking me?

 

Dawn

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Hi Dawn!

 

Not sure exactly what the ID looks like but guessing it will be a credit card sized card with a photo and details on. Don't feel worried about asking them for ID and don't forget to get them to sign your visitors book - make sure you get the first tick in the box!! Just make sure that whoever answers the door/buzzer checks who it is before letting them in - is security at the main door/how far can anyone get without being checked if they were let in with a parent?

 

As far as your knowledge is concerned, they will want to ensure that you are suitable for running the nursery. You obviously have good knoweldge of FS/BTTM and the National Standards/Every Child Matters. With regards to other areas of responsibility, re-read your policies, speak to the staff with responsibiliites (CP, SENCO etc) to get up to speed with latest legislation.

 

Are you responsible for sorting out NEF or does the owner do this or is there an accountant? Again, speak to them to find out the basics.

 

DON'T WORRY - EVEN THOUGH WE PERCEIVE THE BIG 'O' TO BE 'THE ENEMY', THEY ARE (usually) ON OUR SIDE AND NOT HERE TO TRIP US UP!!

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agree with RB,

 

also Have ready your SEF, this will show any action plans ie: Child protection training, revue of policy etc. You cannot get everything done in a short period of time, just show your knowledge and the areas you (and your staff) know something about but plan to learn more about. Obviously legislative requirements must be met, these are indicated in the standards.

 

I.D. show that you look at it, record in visitors book and add them to your register, or whatever system you use which lets you know how many people are in the building re: Fire drill.

 

I have never as yet had Ofsted ask me details about NEF except how many children aged 3/4 are currently on register who recieve it.

 

Have a look at reports of other settings in your area on the Ofsted website, this may give you an idea of what the Inspectors in your area have particular reference to during Inspections ( if any-if you know what I mean)

 

Good luck.

 

Peggy

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Our id was like a passport that flipped open don't know if that helps, definetly don't forget the signing in. they showed us the id before we could ask haha

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Also use your other staff strengths. You'll have given them responsibilities for a reason, so make sure they show off their knowledge too. It's like a head of a school - they appoint art coordinators, and literacy coordinators and SENCOs etc, because they have skills in these areas. 1 person cannot be expected to be an expert at everything, or to be better than others.

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and i suddenly start to feel nervous!

 

Okay have got it, check ID and sign visitors book (mental note made! :o )

 

the rest of it, well im scared stiff! im pretty sure all our practices are okay, but with regards to designated persons, well.... the last manager gave positions out to anyone who would accept them.

i am child protection officer, but know little about it and there is no training available in our area on this at present.

Our health and safety officer is a member of staff training for her NVQ3 and she only has limited knowledge on helath and safety.

Our SENCO has never done it before, although her name is down for training.... and im beggining to feel were a little stuffed!!!!!!

 

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh, (hee hee)

 

Dawn

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As far as your child protection knowledge is concerned - make sure you have an aciton plan in place for training and updating knowledge and that you and the staff all know what you would do if you suspected abuse. This is one of the big areas in my LA at the moment as not all staff appear to have knowledge in this area and don't know even the basic signs and cues for abuse.

 

If you have an early years advisor/development officer, see if they can come and do some support with you as Child Protection is a major part of the Staying Safe aspect of the inspection.

 

The teachernet website has downloads of 'what to do if you are worried a child is being abused' (www.teachernet.gov.uk and then do a search) and the flow chart, which is useful. I have tried to link to it, but it doesn't work when I try and open it again -sorry!

 

RB x

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ID was a badge on a ribbon worn as a neckalce with photo on it (we knew her but still checked it)

 

She asked who was reponsible for which area and spoke to them about it but also other staff too, so all had to be aware of procedures etc. For Child protection she spent about 20 mins with one member of staff, our youngest and newest who as it turned out had done her half training the night before.

 

Ask your LA for training in this area if they are not already doing it, our area welcomes suggestions on we need training and try to provide it.

 

Also you can get info from NSPCC along with a distance child protecion 'training' for want of a better word look here for educare training, and NSPCC web site

 

You have to pay for this but somehow I managed to get the educare training free in a postal offer sent a while ago, and used it as an update , not as good as LA training but useful if you cannot find anything else. (They also do a basic food hygeine distance learning)

 

Our LA also sent us a file with child protection info and contacts etc , every setting had one.

 

They have never asked about grants except how many children recieve it, this time not even broken down into 3 or 4 yr olds, it is LA job to monitor and deal with this.

 

As RB says an action plan will help , they do take into consideration the fact that you are aware of training needs if you can show you are aware and what your plans are for staff training, we have a list of staff, their reponsibility, training already done with dates and training needed or updated, and a time scale for completion.

 

Inge

Edited by Inge
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The old ACPC ( area child protection committee) are now called LSCB (Local safeguarding childrens board)

search the info Here

 

for contact details for your local LSCB.

 

Peggy

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Isn't it strange how they are operate so differently, I had made sure I was up-to-date on all my SENCO stuff and spent night after night worried and reading up and our inspector asked who the Senco was and then said to me, have you attended training to which I said Yes but felt that once a year courses offered in our area was not really enough and that was that ticked off the list and no questions asked about procedures or anything?? :o

 

At least for my own professional development I had read-up and reinforced for my own knowledge.

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Isn't it strange how they are operate so differently, I had made sure I was up-to-date on all my SENCO stuff and spent night after night worried and reading up and our inspector asked who the Senco was and then said to me, have you attended training to which I said Yes but felt that once a year courses offered in our area was not really enough and that was that ticked off the list and no questions asked about procedures or anything?? :o

 

At least for my own professional development I had read-up and reinforced for my own knowledge.

 

 

Then spent 20 minutes with my SENCO, (who also happens to be my daughter). She was brill, very cool, she actually told them that everything was tickity-boo :D . Ofsted well impressed. Their feedback certainly boosted my daughters confidence and sense of achievement. I was pleased they gave her the time and showed a real interest in her work because a few weeks previously she had arranged a meeting at our setting for a parent, local Area Senco, and 3 other 'experts' to discuss developmental needs of a child who has Downs Syndrome. She did this to support the parent who was running round in cuircles with everyone and lots of 'singular' meetings. Parent was pleased to have a chance to get everyone together. :D

 

This is an example of the positives of Ofsted Inspections, they can make you feel very valued. Just don't be shy, let them know about all your achievements thus far. :D

 

Peggy

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