Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Deputy Manager/Qualifications


C1403
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello

Just looking for different viewpoints really as the EYFS is a bit vague when talking about a Named Deputy.

EYFS states 'The provider must ensure there is a named deputy who, in their 
judgement, is capable and qualified to take charge in the manager’s absence'

Question 1-Am I right in thinking a Deputy must have a minimum Level 3. Could staff working towards a Level 3 (on the course right now) be a named deputy?? I'm guessing not.

2-Does the role of Deputy need to be a formal job title or could the Manager delegate on the day to a member of staff she deems suitable and qualified (ie Level 3/experience/able to lead the team).

We are a small committee preschool and operate from one room (plus garden). 

Our deputy manager (who had the same job description as everyone else except they deputise in managers absence etc) has left so we are trying to work out if we need to replace or could we delegate to one of our other staff who is suitable as and when needed. Staff are reluctant to have the 'Deputy Manager' title but happy to step in and deputise if needed (not sure why tbh?)

Our manager is full time, works within the daily ratios however we are obviously mindful and need to take into account possible emergency/ sickness if that was to crop up.

How do your settings work?

I'm guessing if no one wants to do it we will have to replace the deputy...but we're slightly overstaffed as it is so could do with not replacing if possible 

Thanks

C

 

 

 

Edited by C1403
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I no longer work in a setting so some of the below may well be out of date practice, so apologies if it is!

She was paid slightly more than General Keyworkers - although not a lot, pennies more than pounds.

She deputised if I was off sick or she would be the one 'in control' of the setting whilst I dealt with any visitors. 

As I was also in ratio, when 'free flow' was in operation between our one hall and garden, one of us would be inside and one out.

If I was thinking about changing anything, I would 'run it past' her first to make sure my suggestion wasn't totally bonkers :) she would also mentor any students as she was so knowledgeable.

My Deputy was also Deputy Safeguarding Lead and whilst I was 'in charge' as manager she would try to keep up to date on anything that was related to policies & procedures whilst I focussed more on curriculum changes, it helped to slightly lighten the load.

I couldn't have survived without my brilliant Deputy not sure I would/could have done the job without her it's all about great teamwork!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 29/05/2019 at 08:02, thumperrabbit said:

I no longer work in a setting so some of the below may well be out of date practice, so apologies if it is!

She was paid slightly more than General Keyworkers - although not a lot, pennies more than pounds.

She deputised if I was off sick or she would be the one 'in control' of the setting whilst I dealt with any visitors. 

As I was also in ratio, when 'free flow' was in operation between our one hall and garden, one of us would be inside and one out.

If I was thinking about changing anything, I would 'run it past' her first to make sure my suggestion wasn't totally bonkers :) she would also mentor any students as she was so knowledgeable.

My Deputy was also Deputy Safeguarding Lead and whilst I was 'in charge' as manager she would try to keep up to date on anything that was related to policies & procedures whilst I focussed more on curriculum changes, it helped to slightly lighten the load.

I couldn't have survived without my brilliant Deputy not sure I would/could have done the job without her it's all about great teamwork!

Thanks. The deputy role has always been a grey area. Some staff don't want the 'official' title even with some extra pay but are happy to help out if the manager is on training or away from the setting. 

Ideally we'd love to promote one of our current level 3s rather than replace the person who has left but of they don't want to then the manager does need the support like you mention...so we'll have to recruit and be slightly overstaffed. I don't even want to think about redundancy or anything like that. I'm just a parent volunteer that took on more than realised!

Thank you

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have always had a number of highly qualified staff who step up as 'Duty Manager' when the need arises (usually very early and very late shifts). I have a Co-manager who is a baby room specialist and SENCo and I oversee the 3+ age groups. Neither of us are 'in numbers' except maybe over lunchtimes or in emergencies. Our Duty Managers have to be L3, have to have DSL training and have to be confident with the nursery operational plan. On a daily basis they are never 'in charge' for more than a couple of hours and we generally have two 'on' at a time as well as the other staff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)