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Early Years National Curriculum


Guest libs
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Hello

I'm new to this, hope someone can help me! I have just been for a PGCE interview for an early years course. It was mentioned to me that I should have a look at the national curriculum for early years, she mentioned something like "stepping stones" but I cant find it anywhere. Does anyone know where I can get hold of a copy? I have the NC for Key stage 1 and 2 already and as Im starting a new job as an early years teaching assistant in January I want to be ready!!!

thank you

Libs

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Hi Libs -

Welcome to the forum and thanks for posting! :D

 

On the Surestart website, there's a big (BIG) document called the Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage, which explains about Stepping Stones and how they fit into the areas for learning etc. You can find it here.

 

Also, we have downloadable stepping stone templates in a very brief article, which you can find here.

 

If you have specific questions, once you've started looking through the Sure Start document, I'm sure the members here will be happy to help you out!

 

Welcome again, and good luck with your new TA role!

 

Best wishes,

Steve.

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undefined hi I'm new too but i doo know that the stepping stones are in the nCurriculum guidance for the foundation stage from QCA (find it on their website and ask for a copy free)

ok

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Hi Libs, and welcome to the site. The other posts answer your question, but here's a very brief description of the Foundation Stage Curriculum:

Divided into six areas of learning: Personal, social, and emotional development; Communication, language and literacy; mathematics; knowledge and understanding of the world(science, IT, Geography/History/R.E.); physical development; creative development.

Within these six areas are "aspects", ie, a way of dividing up the six areas further. And, within an aspect are early learning goals (aims for the end of reception year). And, ( ) the stepping stones are, quite simply, little steps toward the early learning goals. These stepping stones are what pre-school practitioners and reception teachers use to plan work, and make observations and assessments on the children.

Once you get your copy of the FS file (free from the QCA), all will become clear!

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Hi

DT is also in Knowledge & Understanding of the World.

 

Get yourself a copy of the Profile handbook too when you contact QCA. Doesnt hurt to have more info than you need and if you're going to do any work in Reception you will need to be aware of it!

 

Susan

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Hi Bubblejack. Personally no I dont think they are. I think we have just juggles the tests to make them look as if they are. The last piece of international research into reading that came out recently (sorry I dont know the source but someone else will) suggested that our children are doing as well as any others in reading, which is encouraging. But also that our children do not enjoy reading as much as European counterparts. Our children are not becoming young adults who read for pleasure and I find this really sad. And I personally think the NLS has a big part to play in this. Also the last maths international study (some years ago now) put Uk behind many countries (that took part in the study). Yes of course you can argue the validity of such research but we do know that children in many parts of Europe do not meet the formaily of teavching lit.num skills until they are 6 or 7, whereas we are often expected to do it at 3. Shout more and louder seems to be the philosophy.

but I do also think that things are beginning to change and the changes can only be for the better, just wish they would be quicker.

Now how's that for a short response?

Is this part of your research?

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Thankyou Mundia for your comments , I am not researching this topic but I would like to. I am just curious. After children leave us I am curious to know if I have benefitted their future education or hindered it. I too have read results comparing children from other countries to ours and our children are lagging behind.Correct me if i'm wrong but can only remember children being expected to "achieve"since the funding was available for the 4 year olds.The schools admitted younger children. then all of a sudden Ofsted insectors wanted to change playgroups into mini schools. What about children who don't attend pre-school /playgroup are not pushed at home but not neglected.They may have not developed their social skills as much but what about thir intellectual skills.I have been the supervisor of my group for 25 years we have always had a book corner ,home corner ,circle time,opportunities for writing ,counting,physical play ,music and lots of creative opportunities.We only have one school in our area that takes 4 year olds as I run a holiday club they can still come untill they are 5 but lots of them lost their enthuisiasm for school already which is not good.Is too much too soon turning them off!

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Hi Bubblejack,

I am intrigued by your comment that children have lost their enthusiasm for school - what makes you say this? What do you think it is that children are doing too soon? I am a Reception teacher, does your local school have unrealistic expectations of your children? We don't have a nursery and most of our children come from voluntary playgroups. I haven't noticed a lack of enthusiasm for learning - they are as lively as ever! I have however noticed that they appear to be more mathematically aware than in the last decade. Also, they seem to have more difficulty with things like dressing, talking clearly and respecting adults. Has playgroup practice changed a great deal since 2000?

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I think this is a really interesting topic-well done Bubblejack for starting it.

I do think that like everything else in this world, there are good and not so good.

Our children are well motivated at foundation level, bit I was commenting to the Head only last week, that by the time they get to year 2, they seem almost deskilled. When they come into the nursery (where they end up if they are not going on the school trip, or have been in trouble) they dont know what to do, cant organise themselves and seem to have lost some of the independence that 2 years ago when they were with us, they had. I think that's sad. And I think that is down to a too prescriptive curriculum, based on the notion that the more children are sat at a table with a book to write in, the more they learn. Which is not so as most of us are aware. If you are seeing children at 5 that are disilluioned, it does beg the question as to what they are doing at school. I have had the misfortune to work in a very formal reception class, where there were very high expectations of the children to produce, and it broke my heart when they didnt (espcially the boys).

But when things are done well, they are great, so we must pat ourselves on the back that most of us are giving the childen what they need and it is doing the best for them. Onwards and upwards :D

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