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P Scales in the early years in special schools


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I'm the new deputy of an all age sld/pmld special school and have recently taken over the assessment of pupils in our early years. We have a hand full of pupils at this age range each year and at present they are assessed using p scales. It was my understanding that p scales weren't to be used until ks1. Is this also the case with pupils who come to us at 4 years old and already have a statement/EHCP or should we still be using the old development matters at this age?

 

Is this advice from DfE or local authority or individual schools? I'm sorry if this topic has been discussed before.

 

Many thanks

Jodie

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The new p scales aren't really designed for EYFS, the guidance suggests using the profile into year one. The guidance is here

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/p-scales-attainment-targets-for-pupils-with-sen

 

I am not sure if the Early support developmental journals are still available but they would be more useful I think. Perhaps other members will know, or try searching for them.

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I'm the new deputy of an all age sld/pmld special school and have recently taken over the assessment of pupils in our early years. We have a hand full of pupils at this age range each year and at present they are assessed using p scales. It was my understanding that p scales weren't to be used until ks1. Is this also the case with pupils who come to us at 4 years old and already have a statement/EHCP or should we still be using the old development matters at this age?

 

Is this advice from DfE or local authority or individual schools? I'm sorry if this topic has been discussed before.

 

Many thanks

Jodie

I work in a special school with SLD/ PMLD children. The advice comes from the DfE that p levels shouldn't be used in EYFS however the developmental matters/ early outcomes isn't broken down enough into smaller steps for our pupils. However I know many special schools do use them because they need to be able to show progress.

We have bought into B Squared which has the early years curriculum broken down into smaller steps. This lets you show progress. There are also plevels in every subject. So we use the early years and then baseline them for p levels when they go into KS1.

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It's my understanding that P Scales shouldn't be used in the EYFS. The Early Support Developmental Journal breaks the Early Years Outcomes into smaller steps. Unfortunately they no longer produce hard copies so you need to download it, link below:

 

http://www.ncb.org.uk/media/884631/early_years_developmental_journal2013.pdf

 

North Somerset have produced a version which won't take so many printer cartridges if you print it out, I've attached a copy.

early_support_assessment_statements_2014_v3.pdf

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I think we should also remember that nothing else, except the educational programmes and the ELGs, is statutory, so if you want to break down developmental milestones into smaller steps then who's to stop you. The dev matters isn't a curriculum, its some guidance on developmental norms. But if you want to use something else you are completely at liberty to do so. However, I think the deal with P levels is that for children in mainstream settings, the EYFS is going to cover them developmentally from birth and to the ELGs, but because they tend to meet milestones that are fairly typical, P levels are wholly unnecessary. (And in my opinion a sign of an SLT who can't be bothered to understand child development within the context of the EYFS)

For children in SEND provision, however, their developmental steps can be so tiny that to use the non stat. dev matters guidance as an assessment pathway is frustrating and inappropriate for professionals and parents alike.

Cx

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