Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

cooperative childcare campaign.


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Any thoughts on the cooperative childcare campaign, they are aiming to increase the percentage of men and awareness of their benefits in early years settings. "Real men work in childcare"

 

http://www.thecooperativechildcare.coop/careers/men-in-nurseries/

 

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=Sm8MU5zDH4adtQbVy4CoCg&url=http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D_T5QKaboBV0&cd=2&ved=0CEIQtwIwAQ&usg=AFQjCNHIdZkIWziuPKCgEpwKiVJbcrkWig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I quite liked the video - nice links between some of the jobs men do and the role of a childcare professional. They've got a bit of humour in there too, with the child being sick - so no-one can accuse them of painting a rosy view of the work.

I don't know much about Co-op Childcare, but I'd say it was quite ambitious to recruit that number of men to the workforce in eight months. Presumably what we're talking about here is positive discrimination in favour of male candidates, and in many ways I have no problem with that - although it would be gutting to know I'd missed out on the perfect job because I'm not a bloke.

I was curious about what the Co-op had said about research showing that the biggest barrier to men joining the childcare workforce is the possibility of being accused of indecent behaviour. I don't suppose anyone knows what research that statement is based on?

Anyway, I shall watch this with interest, and see if they reach their target!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

In the school that our Pre-School is in, there are 3 male teachers and a male TA which is great. The children love them. I have to say though, in the 14 years I have been manager of my setting, I have only ever had one application from a male ( I have to add that we do have a very low turnover of staff though so there have not been loads of employment opportunities). It's such a shame that more men aren't in the sector because the children get so much out of a male influence and perspective...especially with changing family structures where they may not have this at home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I visited a large nursery and forest school in Copenhagen this summer and 60% of their staff were male! They couldn't give me any insight into why Danish men thought early years education and care was a good career to get into- they just did :1b They are paid a higher salary than in the UK, of course, but it seemed to be much more to do with the attitude that working with very young children is fabulous (which of course it is).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I did my nursery nurse training back in 1996, a lad from my school started on the course, he was really passionate and did really well with assignments but when he turned up to a home placement he had the door slammed in his face and his nursery placement suddenly weren't able to have him as a student, with that he left.

 

In my experience there are very few men who chose to work in early years, I would imagine the pay is a factor as well as the assumption it's "women's work" I've come across one other male in early years in 20 years and I think that's pretty poor.

 

I'm currently a TA for a male teacher in a large primary and he is fantastic, we are fortunate that we have a number of male staff in school which as a previous poster mentioned can influence and impact on children who may not have those sort of relationships in their lives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)