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Toileting Issues In Reception


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Could anyone tell me if there is any guideance on whether as teachers we should change soiled children.

Since the start of the new term I have had two children who have soiled themselves, the first does not like to use our toilets and the second may have been unwell. I have no classroom support and have to send for 'backup' each time. I am uncomfortable with a) Removing a member of staff from the nursery and b) whether I should be checking/cleaning a reception aged child in the first place.

I spoke to a collegue from another school and she thought that there may be some guideance on this. I would be very grateful if anyone could help.

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I have a little boy who has solied himself nearly everyday he started - just doesn't bother going to the toilet!! My CA did change him the first couple of times but now we have started phoning home and don't even have to say why we are calling before the dad says he is on his way. Its amazing how quick the parents have now got an appointment at the doctors!!!!

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I have many children whom are at various stages of toilet training ranging from totall unawareness to those that need to be reminded every half hour. I have taken children from the age of 2.6. for many years a FEW of whom were NOT toilet trained but have noticed now that it MOST of whom are NOT toilet trained.I have 5 staff members so one of us can be on toilet duty all morning. This is quicker than mopping up accidents and parents tell me that this encourages their training at home.Is it really enviromentally friendly to delay toilet training for so long.

I am allowing for the fact that schools are taking children at 4 but a few years back it would have been so unusual for a child to have a "toilet accident" unless they had a medical condition.

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OH Bubblejack I couldn't agree more!!

 

Not so long ago we had NO children in nappies and the vast majority of 21/2 year olds were toilet trained, we just had the occasionally accident and only ever the wet type!

We now have children over the age of 3 who are totally un toilet trained - it seems to be the trend but i have no idea why! :o

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Ok...my theory is and it is only a theory.....

 

nappies these days are too dry.....designed to keep the child dry and comfortable they do not actually feel or realise they are wet or wetting.......

 

nappies in the past allowed the child to feel wet and would encourage them to indicate the need to be changed .....parents would get fed up with the need to change every wet nappy or clothes regulalry became wet by leaking anyway and hence encouraged toilet training to save time, washing etc......

 

we too have had a lot more nappies and we only take over 3 yrs,

 

however that siad you cannot refuse a chidl in nappies, or discriminate against them by insisting they are clean and dry or by calling in a parent to change them....

 

"This comes under The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA)

Any admission policy that sets a blanket standard of continence, or any other aspect of development, for all children is discriminatory and therefore unlawful under the Act. All such issues have to be dealt with on an individual basis, and settings/schools are expected to make reasonable adjustments to meet the needs of each child.

Asking parents of a child to come and change a child is likely to be a direct contravention of the DDA, and leaving a child in a soiled nappy for any length of time pending the return of the parent is a form of abuse. "

This was taken from a sure start document Leicester City LEA guidance for all foundation stage providers

 

full document to be found using the link provided previously (post5)

 

Inge

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Ok...my theory is and it is only a theory.....

 

nappies these days are too dry.....designed to keep the child dry and comfortable they do not actually feel or realise they are wet or wetting.......

 

nappies in the past allowed the child to feel wet and would encourage them to indicate the need to be changed .....parents would get fed up with the need to change every wet nappy or clothes regulalry became wet by leaking anyway and hence encouraged toilet training to save time, washing etc......

 

we too have had a lot more nappies and we only take over 3 yrs,

 

however that siad you cannot refuse a chidl in nappies, or discriminate against them by insisting they are clean and dry or by calling in a parent to change them....

 

"This comes under The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA)

Any admission policy that sets a blanket standard of continence, or any other aspect of development, for all children is discriminatory and therefore unlawful under the Act.  All such issues have to be dealt with on an individual basis, and settings/schools are expected to make reasonable adjustments to meet the needs of each child. 

Asking parents of a child to come and change a child is likely to be a direct contravention of the DDA, and leaving a child in a soiled nappy for any length of time pending the return of the parent is a form of abuse. "

This was taken from a sure start document Leicester City LEA guidance for all foundation stage providers

 

full document to be found using the link provided previously (post5)

 

Inge

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Yes I'm sure that you are right and of course it would be inappropriate to leave children in soiled nappies. My children however are in a reception class and the child concerned is already 5. I have no NN or CA and am therefore alone with my class. I was hoping that there may be some guideance or code of practice for this age group.

EmmaB

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Do you need to speak to your SENCo as this is obviously an unusual problem for your school. Maybe the head needs to think about some support for you for a bit. Do you have a school nurse, ours is lovely and would support us and parents if needed.

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Hi Emma,

The Disability Discrimination Act encompasses all ages. I think you need to talk to your head and ask that he/she provides the cover staff for this situation you have. It is the schools legal obligation to do so under the act.

 

You (as I am quite sure you know) have to consider the needs of the child, the needs of the class when the individual childs needs are being met and your need not to get stressed by trying to do 2 jobs at once.

You say you are uncomfortable with asking for support from the nursery, is this your own feeling of not wanting to exploit their ability to help or because they make you feel that it is not their role to help your class? I can understand that you feel uncomfortable with the fact that a child has not developed his/her toileting skills, at age 5 and I am sure this is something you can support him/her with, like any other developmental milestone, it's just not a usual occurance at this age ( although as others have said, toileting skills do seem to be developing later than previous generations).

The first child definitely needs some support in getting over his/her fears of using the school toilet, what do parents say? is this problem just at school or in other places as well? Do you know if he had this problem at Nursery / Preschool? If this is a new problem and not just a development one, maybe there are some other emotional issues that he/she needs support for. The second child hopefully is well now and his/hers was a one off incident.

 

 

Good luck, don't try and deal with these issues ( practical and value based) by yourself, get some support from the school.

 

Peggy

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