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Wellies


Melba
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Does anyone have any information about what effect wearing wellies all the time might have on the feet of children around 2-3 years old? We seem to have more and more who never come in a pair of shoes of any kind and only wellies.

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Guest youngrisers

we found that certain little people seem to wear wellies whatever the weather. We do recommend wellie socks and a change of shoes on entry so have spare plimsolls available so they can change from willies to another shoe less sweaty feet and then if they are going outdoors they change back into wellies. Modern wellies seem to be the fashion at the moment

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Wellies does seem to be the most amusing predictive test issue, doesn't it. I have to change it back to "wellies" twice!

 

I do like the idea of asking them to change inside though. I know wellies have their place, but I do find them a bit cold at this time of year and the real littlies may not be able to express that.

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I cut & pasted this from my podiatrist friend's leaflet - there's a bit about wellies right at the end. We keep a wellie rack by the door and the children change into their wellies if necessary, then back into their shoes when they come back inside. The wellie rack also adds a lovely splash of colour in the outside area ;)

 

"Childhood foot problems

Foot health is extremely important. The foot shape and arches change enormously as your child grows, how you child stands,walks and runs will have a large impact on their knee, hip and low back health.

One major challenge to children’s foot health are the shoes they wear. Over use of high heels, thin soled shoes, studded sports shoes or very flat pumps can all contribute to problems.

Wearing high heels (anything over 2”) is especially stressful on the joints of the foot because the whole weight of the body is forced into a narrow, pointed area. High heels can contribute to knee and back problems because of the way wearers are forced to pay attention to their balance and to take shorter strides. Heels also force the thigh muscles to work harder, putting extra strain on the knee joints and tendon that runs from the knee cap to the thigh bone. (Compared with walking barefoot, high heels increase the pressure on the inside of the knee by around 26 percent and over time this increased pressure on the knee can lead to osteoarthritis).

Flat shoes are usually easier on your feet than heels, but with no shock absorbency and little heel support, there is a risk of developing a painful condition called plantar fasciitis (pain on the soles of your feet) andcalcaneal bursitis (pain under your heel). Studded football or rugby boots are often a cause of heel pain in young boys. Flip flops can also lead to similar heel problems and force the toes to claw to keep the shoe on. Even wellington boots can be a problem as they generally are less supportive than needed and can be a breeding ground for bacteria. The key is not to always wear the same shoes and where possible always try to choose good quality well fitted shoes for growing feet."

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  • 1 month later...

Have you tried mentioning footwear in your news letter or Parents information leaflet?

I suggest in my leaflet that named wellingtons are left at Pre-school, so children learn the benefit of changing their shoes and foster an I can do it attitude, Parents are usually keen when children learn through a routine experience. I also buy wellingtons from charity shops when I see them, so we always have spares.

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One thing to consider: some families can only afford one item of footwear at a time. Wellies can be worn in all situations, especially during this awful weather. Leather shoes soak up the wet, leaving children with cold feet and parents with the problem of trying to dry them out before next wearing. Hard if you are also cutting back on heating. I know this won't be the case for every family, maybe not any of them, but it's worth bearing in mind?

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