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Potties - Help Please


diane
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As I said back in May this year (another topic!), I am averse to the use of potties in our sessional pre-school because there isn't anywhere to clean them properly.

 

The setting where I work has just acquired a potty for "communal use". I'm not happy with this. I'd rather go for a "fit on the loo seat" if children cannot manage the toilet as it is.

 

I had gone along with "children's own potties" (i.e. the potty from home) up to a point. I would say to the adult collecting (if possible) that the potty had been cleaned, but not properly (and I always tied it up in a plastic bag after it had been used and cursorily cleaned). I was bothered about this, but not as bothered as I am about more than one child using the same potty. This seems like a health risk: gastrointestinal infections just waiting to pounce on us!

 

I'm sure I've read somewhere that potties should not be cleaned in hand-washing basins (the modern, stable-on-the-floor, potties do not fit into our basins anyway).

 

Please, can anyone point me towards some written guidance on use of potties and relevant hygiene procedures for sessional care settings?

 

I feel, that if we must go down the "potty route", I would prefer the Tommee Tippee Port-a-Pottee, that uses disposable bags to collect urine and faeces, so that the potty itself only needs cleaning like a normal toilet seat. Not environmentally friendly, maybe, but ..... safer?

 

All information gratefully recieved (please)

 

Diane

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We had this worry recently too. We are lucky enough to have low toilets but a boy was reluctant to use them. As it was, his mum decided to bring the potty in secret so we had it if there was a problem. As is often the case with kids xD he never asked and has used our toilets with no problems!!

However this doesn't help you! I'm assuming you don't have low toilets...

We also wondered about what we should do with used nappies? We admit from 2 years 9 months and have so far not had any in nappies. One has now started and as per our policy, used nappies are returned to the parent to dispose of. But where should we store them :o They are in a nappy sack but even so...

advice for me too please!

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Hi,

 

As a DN, we obviously have a far larger situation here ..!? :o

 

Our used nappies are stored for collection by a commercial company, thus we have somewhere to put those used by an older child. Whilst potty training we have never had any problem with Social Services (in the olden days!) or Ofsted with our current policy/practice of communal usage, followed by thorough cleaning and subsequent sterilisation. I would far rather have a communal potty or three that as readily sanitised!!

 

Just a thought

 

Sue :D

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Thanks Pandamonium

 

 

Our toilets are standard adult size. But we do have "step-ups".

 

Nappy changing! Hmmmm. I don't mind doing it. Great opportunities for language, etc. But now we take children from 24 months, nappies are becoming increasingly common.

 

However, I feel that there should be a set "procedure" for this (and I feel the need for me to have a disposable apron as well as gloves). At nappy change, I think we should "toilet" the child as well (even if there is no likelihood of them performing). This takes us one step further from potties (if a child sits happily on the toilet, then a potty is less likely to be needed). And of course, hand wash adult and child after nappy change.

 

Sorry, you've set me off one one .....

 

And who should change nappies??? Surely not a mum staying for the session (unless it's only her child)?

 

Do you (or anyone else) have a procedure?

 

Diane.

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Hmm ..............

you have set me thinking as well! We take two years old and have had a large intake this September. We don't as yet have a nappy policy but feel I may need to write on. Only staff who have been checked change nappies unless of course the childs parent is available . At present we bag and bin nappies in the outside bin , wear gloves and have aprons provided but not all staff wear the aprons.

I found this on the infection control website but not really a lot of help.

 

 

2.3 Nappy Hygiene

A designated area should be assigned for nappy changing. Tables used for play or preparing/serving food must not be used for this purpose. Hand washing facilities must be available in this area.

 

Changing mats should be clean and waterproof with no breaks or tears in the covering. Paper towelling can be used to protect the changing mat and must be discarded between uses. If the mat becomes soiled, it must be washed and dried and thoroughly wiped with pre-sept. solution before further use.

 

Disposable nappies should be wrapped securely in a plastic bag before being placed in a waste bin. Specialised collection systems are a useful alternative if the quantity of this type of work is large.

 

All nappies should be covered with an outer waterproof layer to prevent leakage.

 

Thorough hand washing must be undertaken following nappy changing, contact with soiled nappies or with changing mats.

 

 

 

Sue

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Sorry, crossing messages:

 

Both Sues (R and Dunmore)

 

Do you have potty cleaning/sanitising procedures? If so, what do they cover?

 

Thanks

 

Diane

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Hi I must be hard cos I tell parents we don't have the facilities to clean potties so we don't use them. I always ask them if they go for a day out do you take there potty. if they say no i say then they have to use a normal toilet. if they say yes i say it makes life alot easier to train them on a normal toilet. must be old age. although i never dragged a potty round to the park or a day out a the beach :oxD:(

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Unsire about hygeine reqiurements re shared potties, but personally feel they should be throughly cleaned between children.

 

I am sure in my research that i discovered that potties must not be cleaned in hand wash basins but have seperate facilities for cleaning them on this basis we have a no potty policy in our setting as we only have hand basins or a kitchen sink!!! but do have all facilities for toilets, seats, steps etc. I treally cannot find the source at this time... will search again to try to find it ... (perhaps somone else has found the same and cah help????)

 

we have developed a nappy changing policy and a nappy changing agreement which we discuss with all parents starting if they tell us... how amny of you discover a child in nappies when the patrent has not tolsd you mid session.... seems to be the trend here at the momment....even if we specifically ask....

 

we used the following atachement to develop a policy and agreement which so far sems to work.

 

Inge

P0001663.doc

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Last week I was out for lunch in a restaurant and a young couple with a child in a pushchair were at the next table - difficult to be sure of the childs age but I guess around 2 ish. At full volume the child shouted 'Wee, wee' and a few yards away was a huge sign pointing to the ladies but no! the mum delved under the buggy and produced a potty and promptly sat the child on it in the middle of the busy restaurant :o

 

However, she used some sort of 'liner' in the potty and the father tied it up and disappeared into the gents to dispose of it.

 

I didn't know there were potty liners but like the idea for use in pre-school, of course potties still need to be cleaned but new liner per child sounds like a positive move to me and of course 'contents' could be disposed of in the loo.

 

Anyone know if they are readily available or whether they work?!

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Geraldine,

 

Restaurant Hell? How could they do that?

 

Anyway, that was my "disposable" potty liner idea. I had one when my girls were little - it meant that they could have "comfort breaks" (American euphemism) in the car on journeys, without me having to find a bush to hide behind! It's a potty "frame" that holds a liner like a nappy bag, but with an adsorbent pad in the bottom of it. The child performs into the bag, everything is contained in the bag, the bag is tied up, and it is disposed of just like a nappy bag!

 

No emptying into the toilet, no potty washing! Just clean the "seat" as you would an ordinary loo seat (i.e. antibac wipe or whatever). Jolly useful for anyone on the move with girls! Not quite so necessary with a family of boys, for obvious reasons.

 

Hence, this would be my preference to the "communal potty" if my setting really feels that potties are essential (and everyone already knows my feelings there!).

 

Oh, gosh, how I love conversation topics such as these!

 

Diane

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Boots used to sell portable potties and liners. I have not used them as potties but found they were very useful for travel sickness on school trips, there seem to be quite a few about, I have just looked up portable potties on google.

good luck

Edited by fay
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Are we talking potty training or convenience?

 

We recently had a child move from the Toddler Room to Pre-school (a bit unsure with her 'wee control') - her first vist , needed a wee, looked around the bathroom a bit, seemed unsure, so I asked if she'd like to try the toilet - one very proud child, telling me all day long how she was going to tell Daddy what a big girl she was, sitting on the toilet - if you dare suggest a potty!!!........

 

Obviously I'm not suggesting any practitioners might juggle training with convenience - just remember my little girl's remarks and experience?

 

Sue

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Who needs potties?  Certainly not the children!

Diane

40289[/snapback]

We had a little girl in our setting who arrived in pull-ups but with a couple of weeks of trooping off with the others to go to the toilet decided she'd like to try 'big girl's knickers'. Unfortunately she was very traumatised by the toilets (no child-sized toilets and we don't have a toilet seat). So mum suggested bringing in her potty. This was two weeks before the summer holidays. This worked very well: she was able to get her potty by herself and this made her more independent (no need for grown ups to hold her onto the toilet in case she fell through!).

 

When she came to our holiday playscheme two weeks into the break, she announced proudly: "I don't use my potty any more: I'm a big girl!".

 

This was the first time I'd seen a potty in a pre-school, but it certainly worked for this little girl.

 

Maz

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I agree Maz! In an ideal world I would love to say no potties in pre-school but all the children are different and deal/cope/handle /develop toilet training in various ways just like any other area of learning.

 

We had one child who literally went rigid with fear at the mere sight of a toilet but happily used his potty.

 

We have potties/toilet seat/steps and of course the plain ordinary toilet and children use whichever they are happy with - .

 

We have one child who uses nothing but potty at home but decided he liked our toilets and poo poos the idea of using a potty at preschool (sorry couldn't resist that expression! :D )

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Hi I was really pleased to see this post. I work in FS1 ina Service Childrens education setting and was wondering what the policy is over in the UK with regard to nappies in FS1 and whether you admit children who are in nappies. We do but they were trying to bring in the no nappy thing before they could start. This is something we keep being told goes on in the UK so would be grateful if you could let me know if this is down to individual settings or local authority etc. I believe that if we continually bang on about children developing at different rates then we cant expect them all to be automatically dry at 3 although perhaps we should be toileting training along with parents..

Thanks for any responce

Tracie

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although perhaps we should be toileting training along with parents..

Tracie

40567[/snapback]

For a brief moment there I thought you meant toilet training parents!

 

I agree Tracie - we do seem to forget all about considering the stage of development of the child and their individual needs when the vexed subject of toileting is under discussion.

 

I can only say that from my perspective (Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead) our LEA has put out very strict guidelines that no early years setting should be telling parents their child has to be fully toilet trained before they can join. There can be no such argument as "we don't have facilities" and we should be catering for each child's basic physical needs.

 

So we take children at whatever stage they're at. Some come in nappies, some in pull ups, we've had one potty user and quite a few at the "I want to wear grown up knickers* but I can't really quite manage it yet" stage.

 

And do you know - we manage the whole thing really quite well!

 

* In the interests of equality, for 'knickers' please also read 'underpants'

 

Maz

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I fully agree with that: our role in toilet training is very important. And, as with any developmental milestone, children do accomplish at very different ages.

 

As you all already know, the only thing that bothers me is the "communal" potty and how to maintain hygiene. I don't feel so bothered about children using their own potties (brought in from home and taken back home at the end of session). I would be OK about potty use if it was done this way. What I have managed to find out is that "potties should be washed in soapy water, in a designated washing area (not a basin used for handwashing), dried, and stored inverted". A bit tricky!

 

Diane

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I fully agree with that: our role in toilet training is very important.  And, as with any developmental milestone, children do accomplish at very different ages.

 

As you all already know, the only thing that bothers me is the "communal" potty and how to maintain hygiene.  I don't feel so bothered about children using their own potties (brought in from home and taken back home at the end of session).  I would be OK about potty use if it was done this way.  What I have managed to find out is that "potties should be washed in soapy water, in a designated washing area (not a basin used for handwashing), dried, and stored inverted".  A bit tricky!

 

Diane

40583[/snapback]

Couldn't agree more: am envisaging a children's cloakroom: peg with room for coat/bag etc; chilled storage compartment for lunchbox storage; somewhere to hang their own hand towel; shoe rack for wellies etc; small box for hygenic storage of washed and dried potty.

 

Anyone think of something I've left out??

 

Maz

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Hi all,

Pre school aged 2-5yrs.

I'm not a potty fan but unfortuanately alot of parents have and have 'trained' their children to be potty lovers. We have 6 children who are not trained and 3 will only use a potty. We have a disabled toilet that we allocate for the potty training, which has our potty, changing mat, changing accessories etc. We also have a locked box which contains antibac wipes/parazone wipes, jug, gloves. When a child uses the potty, we move potty to side, sort out child-child returns to room and then we open locked box. Tip contents in potty down loo, use jug to fill water from tap to rinse potty, empty contents down loo and then wipe with antibac wipe and put down loo(flushable wipes). Potty clean. Nappies or pull ups - we used to give these to parents to take home but now we are having more and more children not potty trained, smell was becomoing a prob. We now put in two nappy sacks and carrier bag of dispose in bin, which is immediately emptied. We are only small so prob have 1 poo nappy and 2 wet a day as most of ours are trained. Ofsted said ok and so did environmental health.

 

Net x

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Thanks net.

 

Sounds like best solution to communal (conventional) potty use where there are no dedicated potty-washing sinks. Do you "wash the potty with soapy water" then "dry the potty and store it inverted"? This is what I'm now led to believe should happen. Nightmare!

 

Anyway - onwards and upwards here - the setting where I start work the week after next has promised me "no hygiene issues". Health inspectors as well as OFSTED - no thanks! I can have a potty with disposable bags. It just came up in conversation (when they asked me about my attitude to nappies [no comment here; no problem] .... I didn't make potties a condition of employment, lol)

 

Diane

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  • 1 year later...

Or as an emergency... my mum devised her own emergency liner(for a child) , with a nappy sack with a sanitary towel stuck to the bottom! xD:o I didnt know they were an actual invention, but when the need strikes some people can be so creative!

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  • 1 month later...

One of our children brings his own potty in that has disposal liners with what looks like a sanitary pad attatched to the liner. Cnt remember what the Mum called it but a brilliant idea. From the local supermarket £8 for the potty and nt sure how much the liners are.

 

Smile

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