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We have had a child with us since he was 6 months old. He went to school last September - we had identified him as having SEN and were working with him as EYA+. Parents not seeing a problem and very reluctant to get help, sign papers, send letters off etc - we perservered and manage inhis last year with us to get some LA inclusion team in to observe and they were workign with us.

During transition for Reception we had meetings at our setting with school SENCo and new Reception teacher who were horrified at his level of need but appreciated that without full parental support we were doing the best we could - LA inclusion team were also having no luck with parents.

Transition meetings at school were held and we attended and put our views over about how best to support him and what we had found worked etc etc School promised to work with us to ease transition as child was due to be with us right up until he started school. School provided no further input to us.

Child came to us October 1/2 term (school hols) and was very distressed and angry about being back at nursery - we spoke to mum at the time and said we wanted to be able to support him but that he was getting confused with the different routines between school and nursery and we needed to agree shared approaches to his care so that he was happy and settled - mum agreed and gave us permission to talk to school.

Mum wants him to come in feb 1/2 term so today I phoned the school and asked for info about how they were getting on with him, strategies and methods they were working with etc SENCO spoke very candidly on the phone - he is being statemented, is still not potty trained, needs 1:1, lashes out and throws things. I explained that it would be useful to meet and if I could get copies of their IEPs that would help us meet his needs in the holidays - SENCO said I had to get mum's written permission. All very friendly.

I have just received email saying that the school would not be providing any paperwork (with or without mums permission) as they had no money or time to be photocopying for nurseries and that they had lots of children using childcare and they were very busy and too busy to liaise with nurseries. If we wanted to see documents they suggested I waited until the statement was published and asked parents for a copy of it. They said they thought it would be unethical to show me / meet with me to discuss the child to see if we would 'like to have him in the holidays' - my point on the phone was always about being able to meet his needs and if he is lashing out at other children whether we can keep everyone safe while he is with us.

I'm really confused, I totally understand the parents permission bit ... but is it unethical for the school to share?

Somebody put me straight!

 

Thanks in anticipation

pw

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having read this has made me feel quite angry - does the school not see that the important one here is the child and sorry but photocopying an IEP takes all of ooh 30 seconds!! you as a setting persevered supporting both parent and child, putting into place all the ground work for successful school transition . Working in partnership with others is paramount to the child and especially as you are caring for him in the holidays - what is there inclusion policy , where is the communication and have you mentioned any of this to mum . Is the school local enough for you to arrange a visit face to face - it is not unethical for the school to share as you have a part to play in child's care and provision as long as parents are happy for info to be shared .

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I don't think its unethical at all, we are all supposed to be on the same side i.e that of the child and doing what is best for them. I have to say my feeder school is very good they are always happy to meet share information etc... obviously you need parents permission but this feels very confrontational of them. I wonder why they are being so unhelpful!!!! I wonder what their policies say about working in partnership???

 

I can understand why this child might find returning to nursery quite difficult, normally children make the break are ready to move up and move passed us. I wonder if mum would be better to see what holiday clubs are running for children with additional needs, they very often do respite in holidays?

Edited by Johanna1
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poor boy - I am guessing his parents work hence the need for care during holidays - my other suggestion may be to try speaking face to face to SENco and head teacher /reception teacher , parents and possibly your area senco who may have suggestions on how to move forward - other option is speak to LEA for advice but need to tread carefully as you do not want to override parents views or make them feel inadequate -keep us posted

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Guest sn0wdr0p

Surely this child is still in the EYFS and the school has a duty under the framework to work in partnership with you. I do sympathise with you as I have the same problem with one of the schools we collect from for our out of school club and their head refuses to share any information with us about a 9 year old boy with behavioural problems.

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Ive had an issue with a playgroup refusing to share information even with parents consent. The parents, due to work, could very rarely drop off or pick up from playgroup. This then also meant that the parents were not receiving any feedback from playgroup.

 

I think you need to speak to your LEA, keeping parents involved of course, to see what they say. I was under the impression that we were to share info for the benefit of the child.

 

Would dread to think what would happen if this was a child protection issue or are the school allowed to use their time and photocopier for that?

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