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Homework! Quick question!


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Hi Tinkerbell, welcome to the forum. :D ::1a

I cant help with your question except to say, I never made my children do homework because when they got home they were tired and home is home, school is school. :rolleyes:

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hi, I dont work in reception but my nephew was in reception last years and each week he would have letters and sounds, reading and number work! too much for 4/5 year old i think.

 

I agree rea, home is home, wiah i could adopt that attitude myself :mellow:

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Unfortunately, it will probably contravene the home school agreement, that you have just signed as parent, not to do the homework.

 

As it was school policy, yes I gave homework but as little as I could get away with and as much fun as possible!

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I teach YR and the only 'homework' we have that is 'expected' is a reading book (10mins per day).

Last year we introduced a maths card which could be completed as fast or slow as the child/family wanted. In my weekly class newsletter I tell the parents what we are doing and give tips for how they could support this at home but that is up to them if they want to.

 

Lucie

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I will be giving them reading books obviously (when I start them) and I send home some odd tasks, such as timing how quickly they can put their own shoes on, or find a 3d shape. I'm trying to provide activities that can be done as a family rather than "work" so the family can spend time together and the child can consolidate some things we have been learning about through fun with them.

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Although personally I don't really agree with 'homework' (in EYFS and KS1) as in my experience most homework is worksheet driven and adds very little to the chilrens learning. I do, however, think it is important to encourage reading at home as much as possible.

As it is a whole school policy to issue homework in our school we in F2 call it our Busy Brain Books...it is aimed at parents/adults working/encouraging/helping their child and we try to make it as practical, relevant and fun as possible.

 

Cx

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Hi

I teach Year R. Our children have a reading book that they keep for a week and we ask if they can read it twice a week if possible. They have our letter sounds or words to learn over the week. Then we have learning sacks that they take home on rotation throughout the class - similar to story sacks - they have a book and a game in it to play at home. The children all want to borrow these from school, so they don't really see it as homework.

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I do something similar to the storysack idea but wel call it a Chatterbox. We have a beautifully decorated box and at the beginning of the week we announce who will be taking the chatterbox home at the end of the week. Then during the week the child collates a range of objects, work, books, pictures, photos- anything really that they have been interested in, completed at school, drawn, read, seen, talked about. Then on Friday they get to take their Chatterbox home and share it with whomever they want.

 

We also send home a little learning journal, where we give tasks which we stipulate are optional, but so far they have completed them all. Task 1 was to play a board game with someone at home, Task 2 was to tidy your bedroom, Task 3 was to invent a game in the garden or at the park - I am trying really hard to think of things that are fun, and not at all school related, but at the same time things like playing a game at home dont happen to many children in my school so I am trying to include the parents too. I don't know if it will continue to be successful, or if indeed I could think of enough interesting things but so far the children are enjoying it and so are the grown ups! They then record in their Little learning journal what they have done (again, optional) and we use it as a tool for speaking and listening.

 

Nicky

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As a parent I didn't like the idea of homework so young and, despite home school agreements, have never been willing to put pressure on my children to complete it. This was a really successful strategy with my first child who is now working really hard for her GCSEs. We'll see how it goes with the second.

 

I just had to mention one student who took my daughter's reception class for a while. She used to allow the children to choose their own homework, from a list of suggestions if they wanted or they could just write about or tell her about an activity they happened to have done at home. She used to listen and then talk to them about what they might have learned from that activity. My daughter was very motivated to find interesting things to do so she could talk about them and she always seemed to choose something which consolidated her school learning. It didn't have to be complicated or impressive. It was choosing matching coloured pegs and then counting in twos while helping me hang out the washing once.

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