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Anticipation Box


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There is a clip on Teachers TV about routines in early years settings where they mention an 'anticipation box' or basket. My understanding is that something is hidden in the box each morning (either by teacher or pupil) and the class have to wait until the end of the day to find out what it is. Apparently they love this. It could be something a child has brought in from home to show the class, a story for the end of the day, an interesting oject of some kind etc.

 

I really like this idea (especially having a basket on a pulley that can be lowered down!) and can imagine how it could be linked in with a topic (e.g. objects associated with different cultural festivals), well with anything really, but wondered if anyone has actually tried this? How might it work in practice? Would you really do it every day, just at the end of the week or perhaps at random?

 

I think I'm going to try it out as I reckon I need all the tactics I can get to keep the little rascals on their toes (NQT) plus it could provide a great way in to all kinds of topics, lots of speaking and listening...what does anybody else think? :o

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There is a clip on Teachers TV about routines in early years settings where they mention an 'anticipation box' or basket.  My understanding is that something is hidden in the box each morning (either by teacher or pupil) and the class have to wait until the end of the day to find out what it is.  Apparently they love this.  It could be something a child has brought in from home to show the class, a story for the end of the day, an interesting oject of some kind etc. 

 

I really like this idea (especially having a basket on a pulley that can be lowered down!) and can imagine how it could be linked in with a topic (e.g. objects associated with different cultural festivals), well with anything really, but wondered if anyone has actually tried this? How might it work in practice? Would you really do it every day, just at the end of the week or perhaps at random?

 

I think I'm going to try it out as I reckon I need all the tactics I can get to keep the little rascals on their toes (NQT) plus it could provide a great way in to all kinds of topics,  lots of speaking and listening...what does anybody else think?  :o

36664[/snapback]

 

 

 

Sounds a great idea.

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Never knew it had a name but I often use an 'anticipation box' for story time and at circle time or as part of listening and speaking activities. I once forgot to put something inside but the children spent ages wondering what had been inside and how it got out. It really grabbed their imagination.

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That's great to hear, I could get quite excited about this box, let alone my class! I am definitely going to try to rig up a pulley. Might have to sweet talk the caretaker :D

 

So do you think it's best used as part of a daily routine, so that the kids know exactly when the box is going to be opened up each day, or just whenever you think it's appropriate during the week? It sounds like you do a bit of both. Have you ever got your class to bring in objects to put in the box? I love the idea of imagining what could have been in it and how it got out!

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Susie, I don't use it every day, but would be interested to hear how you get on. I have several boxes and ring the changes.

We also play a game "What's in the Box" Children can ask questions about the mystery object but cannot guess what it is until five questions have been asked, I sometimes put in a object the children have brought in from home without their knowledge.

Another idea I have used is have two small boxes one round one square inside are objects, many from MacDonalds, that move, make a noise, or are soft and cuddly.

Select a child to choose, first they choose a box, round or square then they choose from noisy, cuddly or something that moves. The child can then hold /play briefly with toy. Select another child to choose. I manage to fit several objects into each box, enough for a whole group.

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I've done this and as you say the children love it. It's a great way fro them to learn to listen to each other and control they're excitment. I wanted them to ask me questions to aid their quesses, this proved too difficult for my children and theiquesses were wild but it was great fun.

 

I've also used objects wrapped up in tin foil so that they can see the shape and feel the object too - lots of descriptive language used and more wild quesses!!! "Is it an elephant!!!" but its great because then you ask them "Why do you think it couldn't be an elephant?" and the reply "because it hasn't got a trunk!!"

 

I sometimes ask one of the children to be the umpire and reply to the other childrens questions - great for building confidence in a quiet child. The only trouble is they're so keen to share the knowledge of whats in the box, it can be a real challenge for them to hold onto that knowledge for 1 or 2 mins - a bit like mind torture!!

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i saw this on teacher tv too, it sounds great and im going to to give it a go.

 

ill probably use it as a small group activity in circle time for speaking and listening. or i may put objects in if the children do not bring something in related to the theme. it could be a good topic starter, to identify what the children know or enjoy about a topic.

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I think it's a great idea and may introduce it for my key worker group time. Then the children are in smaller groups for chatting. I also recently read a book called "One Child" and picked up an idea about an "encouragement" box. The teacher initially writes little notes about different children and a good thing they have spotted in the day. "Well done, Sam. You tidied up for your whole group." / "Chloe, you were very kind when you helped Freddy when he fell over." / "Olivia, your hair looks very nice today"

Then at the end of the day the box is opened and the messages read out. As the year progresses childen are encouraged to write their own notes for the box to say something nice to someone else.

Sounds a lovely idea.

heyjude :o

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Great ideas!  It is a pity that we don't get "Teacher's TV" here in Europe :o.  Thankfully you always share about this and your own ideas.  Thanks!

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You can get to see some of the teachers tv programs on line. So you should be able to see it. If you register you can bookmark some favourite programs or download them. You should be able to locate the early years stuff on the primary zone and their is an archive of past programmes.

Good Luck

 

http://www.teachers.tv/home.do

 

Michaelle

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  • 4 weeks later...
Last minute, pre-holiday post -  :o

 

WOW!!!

 

Did the children LOVE it - and the staff, don't know who was more hyped!!!!

 

Convinced,  :D  :D  :D

 

Sue  :D

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Hi Sue!

 

I just wondered how you were getting on with your anticipation box and whether you have continued with it. I have a basket on a pulley which I hoist up and down and when I first tried it out the kids were so excited! Good for practising counting backwards from 10 too. However, I am now running out of ideas a bit and wondering how to work it into the routine. The first time I used it I put my sticker box inside to give children stickers at the end of their first day at school. Now they always hope for stickers! I have also put photos in to start our topic of Ourselves and storybooks BUT wondering how on earth to keep it up! Do you think it's a once-a-week or a once-a-day thing, or just to be used at any good opportunity? Would love to hear from anyone with experience of using this....how does it work in practice? So hard to keep thinking of something different to go in it!

 

Susie (NQT!)

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Hi Susie,

 

Yes, we are still doing it. When i got back from my hols I found it was an established part of the daily routine - the box is felt and passed around at registration circle time, with comments or guesses being made, then after lunch there is a great ceremony of opening the boxx - we try to make it as long winded as possible, to really pile on the 'anticipation'. At first the adults placed items in the box, but now the children have taken over, we have to monitor this so everyone gets a turn, but there's always great excitement when I produce the box and it's closed and tied up (it's an old gift box, shiny red, about a 9 inch cube, with a lid and a black satin ribbon to fasten it - so it's really attractive and stimulating to lookat, feel etc, anyway), because it means someone's put something in!!

 

I haven't yet tried it empty, but I don't think it will be long!

 

Thanks for the idea :)

 

Sue :D

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It is a fantastic idea and I use it every day .it has become an event that everyone looks forward to.Sometimes it is difficult to think of something exciting and novel but the children dont seem to mind.If I have forgotten I just look around the classroom and I always find something.

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