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Eyfs Planning


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Hi does anyone have the answer to this question we are a special school we use the devlopment matters. i wanted to know legally where should the early yuear practiners be planning from, where do they get their objectives and outcomes from?

 

Thank you

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Whilst the EYFS framework is enshrined in law, like anything it is open to interpretation. IIn my setting it is there to enable us to assess where children are developmentally, to use as guidance as to possible ways to enhance children's learning but should not be used as a deficit model, ie trying to fill in the gaps, it is after all what developmental psychologists have decided that the average or normal child can do at a certain age. But this is a fabricated child. What is normal? Planning should start with the child, what they can do, personalizing the curriculum to fit the child not the child to fit the curriculum, so planning should enable the child to consolidate their skills or knowledge or extend it to what the child could achieve with a little help from a skilled practitioner or peer.

 

 

As for learning outcomes, you might have an idea of what the learning outcome could be but the child could have other ideas.

 

 

The curriculum should include a child's willingness to learn, their disposition to learn, being ready and willing to learn as well as able, as well as encouraging children to think creatively.

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Good answer from Deb, but a lot of settings are still planning around a set topic, whilst others plan a loose theme and then work in children's needs and interests - a sort of hybrid of both systems really.

 

Many people say they would like LAs or Ofsted or whoever to offer much more guidance on how planning should be done, however many of us prefer having the freedom to devise a system that best suits our children, our setting and us. Working with someone else's planning system is fine when it makes sense to us, but I would imagine it could be a real struggle if we didn't really 'get it' if you know what I mean.

 

Can I ask why you're posing the question, sbegum?

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Good answer from Deb, but a lot of settings are still planning around a set topic, whilst others plan a loose theme and then work in children's needs and interests - a sort of hybrid of both systems really.

 

Many people say they would like LAs or Ofsted or whoever to offer much more guidance on how planning should be done, however many of us prefer having the freedom to devise a system that best suits our children, our setting and us. Working with someone else's planning system is fine when it makes sense to us, but I would imagine it could be a real struggle if we didn't really 'get it' if you know what I mean.

 

Can I ask why you're posing the question, sbegum?

 

Thanks really useful.

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The ages and stages part of the framework are guidance and not statutory. The only statutory part of the curriculum are the curriculum requirements which describe what children should be taught at the start of each area of learning and the ELGs for the end of the phase as the expected outcomes for children aged 5.

 

Learning objectives can be written in your own words to describe the specific learning you are aiming to achieve.

 

Cx

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