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Lecturer Interview


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Hi a few months ago I applied for a lecturing post, was invited for the interview, but unfortunately I couldn't make it and heard nothing more. Yesterday I received a telephone call from the college asking me if I was still interested, which I am, and could I go for an interview/chat on Monday afternoon, which I can!

 

I am a qualified assessor and have worked as a full time assessor so I am used to mentoring learners and also mentoring/advising in the workplace and I have done some, not much teaching, (childminding courses and at staff meetings) however I have never been interviewed for a lecturing/teaching position.

 

Therefore I want to ask advice from you lovely people on here; especially those of you who are lecturers; what kind of things am I likely to be asked at interview and what kind of things should I ask them!! Nothing has been mentioned about a micro-teach, though I expect that will follow.

 

I am very excited as this is an area I have wanted to get into for a long time (plus some of you may remember I'm not very happy were I currently am), but am completely out of my comfort zone and dont know what to expect at interview!!

 

HELP!!!!

 

Thank you !!!!

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When I was interviewed I had to do a presentation but I had been warned about that before hand, so I can't imagine they'll want you to do anything like that.

 

I was asked about differentiation, and how I'd ensure that I was meeting every student's needs effectively. Safeguarding will inevitably come up and I think I was asked about the kind of emotional climate I like to create in my classroom. From memory there was a conversation about behaviour management, too. I was asked to talk about how my teaching style and experience would enable me to fulfil the job criteria.

 

My interview was particularly disastrous because HR had sent them someone else's CV so all their questions were aimed at a completely different person! :o I had to go away for a short while to enable them to sort out the whole mess! They gave me top marks for flexibility and grace under pressure! And I got the job (although I think the pool of candidates might just have included me, so it was perhaps a foregone conclusion!).

 

Have you got a job description and a person specification? That might give you some clues about what they're likely to ask.

 

Good luck and make sure you let us know how you get on! xD

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Great advice from Maz :o

What sort of lecturing position is it? If it's a Uni, then I can tell you about my experience.

I was asked about the sort of research I'd like to carry out, in addition to my teaching load and admin duties. I was asked about the principle documents/statutory and non-statutory guidance available for the early years workforce, and also, like Maz, how I would differentiate my input to students who come from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences. Also, quite a bit about time management and how flexible I was willing to be, in terms of taking on teaching in areas that perhaps were out of my comfort zone!

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I was interviewed and got the job as lecturer for level 3 NVQ students!

 

As I recall the interview was mainly about behaviour management and pastoral care of students!

 

I had not lectured before, it was very interesting but the contract was only for a year and by the time it was due to be renewed I had started my degree and felt I had enough on my plate as I was working full time and doing the tutoring for evening classes.

 

Good luck!

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Thank you everyone; no nothing about a presentation or a micro teach, the email said to come along for a chat/interview!

Its lecturing in a college not a Uni. I'll give lots of thought now to differentiation for different learning styles, pastoral care and safeguarding; I think their policies maybe on their website.

 

Lots of reading for me over the weekend I think!!!

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Thank you for your advice and suggestions so far. I have carried out some research on meeting the students differing needs (visual, auditory and kimesthetic), pastoral care and safeguarding, including what the college itself offers in terms of these areas.

 

What I'd really like now though is ideas, hints, tips on how you deal with disruptive, inappropriate behaviour in the college classroom and how you set the "emotional climate" within that classroom

 

Thanking you in anticipation!!!

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Well speaking personally, I like to set out clearly from the beginning what I expect from my learners, and encourage them to do the same in reverse. So from the outset we are both involved in coming up with a list of classroom 'rules' and have clear expectations.

 

So for instance, one of the things I really hate is when I'm talking about something and a group or couple of learners decide to have their own side conversation, not always quietly. I have a variety of ways of dealing with it, depending on the personality of the person and the situation. So I might just stop talking until they do, and then carry on. Or I might ask one of them if they have something to add or a question they want to add. Sometimes I will even put on my best Joyce Grenfell voice and ask that we only have one conversation going on at once. The trick is to remind them who is in charge without putting them down or humiliating them. Sometimes all I need is the 'killer look' I inherited from my mother! xD

 

It is easy to generalise but I have to say that in teaching adults on Level 2 to Foundation Degree, I haven't come across much disruptive behaviour. On the whole, they want to be there and they want to learn. Sometimes they are more motivated than others (especially if you teach on the 'graveyard shift' in the evening!) but you'll be well able to talk about how you motivate learners from your previous experience.

 

As for the appropriate emotional climate, I think this is a matter for your own personal style and personality. I want my learners to feel they can say anything and not be judged, whilst at the same time being offered a level of challenge so that they can reflect on their opinions and their practice. In order to do this I have to make an emotional connection with them, which means I have to share my own views and feelings, to an extent.

 

There is also a lot of humour in my classrooms, and this informality can be misinterpreted by learners and so I do need to retain a level of professionalism and an eye on my learning goals to ensure that things don't get out of hand. This, for me, is the biggest challenge - sometimes discussions can take an unexpected turn and all too often I find myself 'stopping the fun' and getting back to our original focus.

 

If you are asked questions about how you'd handle disruptive behaviour, it is likely to be in the form of a mini case study so you'll at least have some information about the scenario. From experience this is much easier than answering a more generic question when you're not altogether sure what the interviewer is asking.

 

I'm not sure how any of that helps, but it probably illustrates how easily I can be taken off track! :o

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Good luck, I enquired about a certificate in further education teaching (or similar) at our local college, and was told it was a good start, but if I wanted to send in my CV if they had an adhoc work, then I could do that! I have never taught, nor done any assessor training, and while I am very interested in this idea, I don't think I could just bowl up for adhoc work!! Will definitely be pursuing this avenue, as I think this is where I wish to progress too, I love training and mentoring my staff, work experience and anyone else that wants to listen!!

 

Maz, where do you teach if you don't mind me asking, as you are quite local to me I think

 

Clare

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Good luck, I enquired about a certificate in further education teaching (or similar) at our local college, and was told it was a good start, but if I wanted to send in my CV if they had an adhoc work, then I could do that! I have never taught, nor done any assessor training, and while I am very interested in this idea, I don't think I could just bowl up for adhoc work!! Will definitely be pursuing this avenue, as I think this is where I wish to progress too, I love training and mentoring my staff, work experience and anyone else that wants to listen!!

 

Maz, where do you teach if you don't mind me asking, as you are quite local to me I think

 

Clare

 

I think that PTLLS is what I was referring too, I just googled what Maz said!

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Well I went along for the interview; seems they are looking for a qualified lecturer full time and 2 part time lecturers one qualified and one unqualified; I am unqualified in lecturing and unfoirtunately not in a position to only work part-time :(

 

She did however say that they are interested and if the situation in the college was still the same by half term then would I mind if they called me again to see what my situation is then. They also said that they are going to be running a L1 course one evening a week and would I be interested in teaching that :o

 

In the meantime she suggested that as part of my CPD to find out about doing PETALS (or whatever it is).

 

So although its not great news, it's not awful news either!! I'm not despondent but it is back to the drawing board!!!

 

Thank you everyone who offered advice xD

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If its the pathway you really want to follow, then it ma be that the one evening session is a way in for you to get some experience. I recall going for 3 interviews for lecturing posts, and in every case the process was multi tasked, and in each case I was apparently the 'second' choice. In each case I lost out to someone with experience lecturing already..leading me to that very frustrating place of how to do get the experience when you cant get the job because you haven't got the experience!

So even a little experience may well be the difference in the future between you getting the job you want and not getting it!

 

(I decided in the end it wasn't the right career move for me at that time!)

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