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Pd Point 6


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Hi

Would you expect a child to be able to spin a hoop around their waist and skip with a rope before giving point 6.

I've just been moderated and this was the advice given. I would have thought these were quite advanced skills for a typical 4/5 year old. I only have oed child who can skip using a rope and another who is beginning to spin a hoop around her waist. I also know lots of adults who can't spin a hoop.

What are your thoughts on this?

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I'm pre-school, so not what you want I think, but we consider children to be skipping, when they can skip without a rope, I would have thought that came much much later - I can remember some year 3's not being able to skip with a rope very well, and we have not to my knowledge ever had an older 4 year old able to hoola properly, quite tricky skills as you say and some adults never manage them either!

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Hi

Would you expect a child to be able to spin a hoop around their waist and skip with a rope before giving point 6.

I've just been moderated and this was the advice given. I would have thought these were quite advanced skills for a typical 4/5 year old. I only have oed child who can skip using a rope and another who is beginning to spin a hoop around her waist. I also know lots of adults who can't spin a hoop.

What are your thoughts on this?

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The evidence I have collected for point 6 does actually tend to be skipping and hula hooping, but that is because a large group of children in my class seem to be obsessed with these and always choose to skip and spin the hoops. I have to say most of these are girls - and I have a about a third of my class who can do these skills but i think its because they have access to these skills daily. I wouldn't say that these are the only skills at all - what about riding a bike, throwing hoops over cones, balancing balls on a bat etc. My PD scores were quite high so I might be an exception. x

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Hi

Would you expect a child to be able to spin a hoop around their waist and skip with a rope before giving point 6.

I've just been moderated and this was the advice given. I would have thought these were quite advanced skills for a typical 4/5 year old. I only have oed child who can skip using a rope and another who is beginning to spin a hoop around her waist. I also know lots of adults who can't spin a hoop.

What are your thoughts on this?

 

 

I would still be on point 5 as I never mastered either being dyspraxic :o

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Goodness that seems a very advanced set of skills to expect from a four year old! Many of my year one children have difficulty with skipping with a rope. They are provided for the children to use on the playground and really only the girls are interested in sustaining the activity for long enough to actually learn how to do it properly. Don't think any of them can actually hula hoop either, though we have these on the playground too. Even the year threes find them hard!

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I have awarded point 6 for general things like bean bags, kicking football, throwing balls and reasonable catching. Using climbing frame at the park and balancing/walking along benches. The handbook does give an example of swinging across monkeybars which I havent been able to look at because we don't have resource. It does say 'showing a range of basic skills' - as Kariana says these seem quite advanced skills - I do have about four who can skip with a rope(the best being a boy strangely enough!), but don't think any of them can hoola hoop!

 

Wonder where the moderator got her information from?

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In the exemplification book there is an example of a child spinning the hoop around her waist for one minute, but i view this as one example out of many- and an advanced one not one typical of an average 4/5 year old.

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I think the example in the handbook or spinning a hoop around their waist is just one example of many, to suggest that all children need to do this would be ridiculous. Don't understand where this moderator has got her information from. I think if you know that your children can demontsrate a range of skills in their play, regarding of what they are then they should be awarded the point.

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You are asking yourself if the child has a range of competency with different things. It might be hula hoops but it is not reliant on hula hoop!!

 

However if you were talking about hula hoops as evidence then as a moderator I would be looking at the level of competency in the skill you are presenting as evidence and how it is demonstrating that skill. If you see what I mean!! The moderator won't be looking for hula hoops!!!

 

It is the physical competency in any normal range of resources that children may have access to.

Cx

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