Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

What Next?


 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm sure there are a number of you in a similar position to me. I acheived EYPS last year, gained my BAhons at the beginning of this year and manage a lovely EYrs setting, where I've been working for the last 8 or so years. At a recent meeting with other practitioners I discovered I am earning much less than an NQT would be earning and am on the same hourly rate as an assistant in an LA setting nearby. For all of my training, commitment and hard work, I still trail behind in the salary stakes and find it unbelievable someone with limited responsibility and experience can be earning so much more.

I must add I work in the voluntary sector of the PVI sector and have a fab committee with my salary boosted by the EYP premium and bursary.

I seem to work all of the hours god sends yet can't afford holidays etc. I love the autonomy my job gives me, have a great team etc. But I do feel a bit like I've worked so hard for the last few years and haven't really progressed in quality of life, if you know what I mean?

 

What do those of you in the know reckon? Is it worth me doing a teacher qualification? It worries me the EYPS isn't recognised and is still no better than the level 3 of ten years ago.

 

Sam

Edited by sam2368
Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are all really difficult issues to address, and I think perhaps are symptomatic of why early years practitioners are under valued and little respected except by those who understand our stories and why we do what we do.

 

Firstly I think you need to look at what it is you want to do with your life. If you have a burning ambition to be a teacher then I would say go for it - you have all the skills and knowledge and will bring all your understanding of how children develop to your teacher's role which can only benefit the children you would be teaching.

 

However if the only reason you're considering undertaking the teacher training is for the salary and conditions (and the status, of course), I'd question whether it is the right move for you at this time. You need to consider the pros and cons of moving on versus staying and see where the balance falls, and only you can really make that decision with the input of those who love you and who will be supporting you as you work hard to achieve QTS.

 

I feel very sad when I hear EYPs leaving the sector - I think one of the aspects of the role that has been lost is the responsibility to lead change within the workforce, and to be trail blazers in terms of improving quality and raising standards. I thought Local Authorities would make much more use of the expertise they have worked so hard to support and nurture - it has happened to some extend within my authority, but I do think there are missed opportunities to get EYPs acting as mentors or supporting other practitioners in their settings.

 

Sorry I'm on my soapbox again - EYPS has given me opportunities I'd never have had if I had stopped at Level 3. I am an EYP mentor and assessor, have moved from teaching level 2 courses to the Foundation Degree, and have undertaken ECERs audit training for my authority. These are all obviously much more lucrative than my day job, and I have to say much higher profile.

 

Whatever you decide you have a lot to offer, and you're quite right to believe that you are worthy of higher status and better pay for all your hard work and dedication to the cause.

 

Good luck!

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried to post the following earlier on but it wouldn't let me for some reason. I agree really with everything above but as I'd typed it, copied to email and sent it to myself I just thought I would add my thoughts!

 

You sound very similar to me. I'm very lucky that my other half earns well enough for me to be able to choose what I want to do but I do sometimes wonder about the career and pay aspects of EYPS. I've recently been asked quite seriously by three different teachers why I don't do a PGCE and work in a school. Their implication was I would easily get a teaching job and that I deserved the status and pay of that from what they knew of me. My big concern though is something you've touched on - the loss of autonomy. I get to pretty much decide the future for my setting and I virtually write my own job description. Could I really leave that to work for a head who might not even understand EYs? I know not all heads are like that but still.

 

My solution for the time being has been to work as an EYP in my setting but not the manager. This frees me up a bit more and gives me the opportunity to take on other roles outside the preschool. I'm currently teaching on a foundation degree too and this pays much better and gives me some wider experience. I don't believe I would have got the position without the EYPS. I should also say I never did it for the money but it is galling when you consider how much a preschool manager does in their role compared to a teacher without management responsibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks both. I care so passionately about what I do, but when I'm still meeting people who work in early years and have never heard of EYPS, it makes me wonder why I bothered putting my self and my family (and my colleagues) through the stress of the last 5 years.

 

I like the idea of teaching FD, assessing and mentoring, so maybe that would be a better route. I'd also consider becoming an advisor for the early years sector but feel the gap between PVI and LA remains far too wide and would worry this would influence my judgement which maybe tells me I'm not yet ready to move onwards and upwards.

 

I don't know, half term really gives you time to take stock doesn't it.

Sam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking into advisory positions is also a useful consideration for the future too, although in my area and neighbouring areas there is definitely a shortage of opportunities on that front. My LA doesn't seem to value the EYPS as much as others which is also something to try to test out first. One neighbouring authority has specifically advertised for an EYP advisor which is quite unusual in my opinion, but I've been quite involved, in a voluntary capacity, with SFF discussions, EYP Networks and generally harrassing the LA! But it gives you a good idea of what they are looking for and what they are thinking, more so than when they just drop in and offer "advice"!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy Maz and Holly35 speak some very wise and inspiring words there.

I have been working as a teaching instructor- that is an unqualified teacher, so I get a decent wage for it but it is relentless, I am now at the point where I am not so interested in QTS!

I think you have to consider long and hard what is right for you, I am considering EYPS but am resting my laurels with it until there is a guarentee of a proper pay scale for it.

Years ago with EYEs Value Nursery Nurses campaign coming to light I geninuely thought we were on our way to getting the recognition and payscale we deserve- although that hasn't happned yet Happy Maz's and Holly35s stories show that EYPS can open many doors and opportunities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you have to consider long and hard what is right for you, I am considering EYPS but am resting my laurels with it until there is a guarentee of a proper pay scale for it.

When are you due to retire Jester? :o

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QTS is still valued above EYPS and the advisory jobs often stipulate QTS which seem strange to me. An EYPS has very broad experience and knowledge of all types of early years settings which a teacher often has not. Surely now it is time for the more senior roles to be given to EYPS's. LA's need to demonstrate their confidence in the EYPS. It is criminal for people who have studied so hard not to have that recognised.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surely now it is time for the more senior roles to be given to EYPS's. LA's need to demonstrate their confidence in the EYPS. It is criminal for people who have studied so hard not to have that recognised.

Of course you're right, Chill - you're pushing on an open door here I think. There was an interesting letter in this week's Nursery World about a job advert in a previous edition where a high profile position (salary £60K I think) asked for the applicant to have a Level 4.

 

Perhaps it is about having the right balance between having high aspirations for applicants who we want to attract, but not wanting to raise the bar so high that those great practitioners out there who have so far not been tempted by gaining EYPS or a higher level qualification but have so much to offer?

 

When I last looked at the figures there were around 4000 EYPs throughout the country - do you think things will change when there are more? And how many more EYPs do there have to be before the Status is more widely recognised and valued?

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QTS is still valued above EYPS and the advisory jobs often stipulate QTS which seem strange to me. An EYPS has very broad experience and knowledge of all types of early years settings which a teacher often has not. Surely now it is time for the more senior roles to be given to EYPS's. LA's need to demonstrate their confidence in the EYPS. It is criminal for people who have studied so hard not to have that recognised.

 

I completely agree with you. But that will only happen when EYPS has the same "standing" as what QTS has. When going to a EYPS course meeting a few years ago I spoke to a few teachers who had just done EYPS who advised me to do QTS because EYPS wouldn't "get me anywhere"!!! :oxD

 

Of course you're right, Chill - you're pushing on an open door here I think. There was an interesting letter in this week's Nursery World about a job advert in a previous edition where a high profile position (salary £60K I think) asked for the applicant to have a Level 4.

 

Perhaps it is about having the right balance between having high aspirations for applicants who we want to attract, but not wanting to raise the bar so high that those great practitioners out there who have so far not been tempted by gaining EYPS or a higher level qualification but have so much to offer?

 

When I last looked at the figures there were around 4000 EYPs throughout the country - do you think things will change when there are more? And how many more EYPs do there have to be before the Status is more widely recognised and valued?

 

Maz

 

Completely agree with you too Maz. I know a few nursery nurses some who I trained with who are not interested in doing EYPS because they feel "Why should I, I should be recognised for the work I have done already why should I do more.?" yet these are people who are in nursery management and advisory roles and are excellent practictioners.

I do think though that the more people actually go for Professional Status then the more it will be recognised. The more attractive it is made (that is with a proper pay scale) and the more backing it has the more it will be valued and be sought after but then I guess the profession as a whole is one that is not valued very much by those who do not work within it :( (just my perception though)

 

That said, having read peoples accounts on this thread EYPS is something that I will definitely consider because like has been said before on another thread (think it was you Maz) it is a great way to underpin knowledge and to readdress your practice within the sector.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)