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Evidencing Next Steps


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Currently, our observation sheets have a section at the bottom for the next steps for that child based on the observation. Some of them can be dealt with by continuous provision, others that require a planned activity are entered onto a planner, and then ideas are used at planning meetings.

 

However, unless we observe each next step, there is no actual evidence that we carried it out. I am getting a bit bogged down in paper work and need a quick and easy system to keep tabs on whether activities are coming into practice or not!

 

Would be great to get some ideas from people. I did add extra at the bottom, but I think that will prove unwieldly. The alternative is a sheet at the front of each child's profile with space to record next step, date carried out and link to observation/ assessment. evaluation. And then remove the need to jot onto the planner, although if not all members of staff are at the planning meeting then we need to bring in their ideas too!

 

It was so much easier when I was childminding!

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At planning we have a sheet for next steps, all next steps are taken off of obs etc and place one by one on to the next steps sheet, their is a column for child name, next step, suggested activity ie planned, continuous provision etc then a space is left for the practioner to tick and sign when they have seen the next step. Each practitioner gets a copy of the next step sheet. So when they are deployed to an area, they are aware of what next steps we are looking for, so if a child who is on the next step sheet is playing by them they can note on the sheet they have seen the next step, or they could decide to suppport that child to achieve the next step (ZPD).

 

At the next planning meeting all sheets are collected, if any child hasnt been observed who is on the next step sheet then they are entered onto the next sheet etc and the cycle continues. The sheet just gives the practitioners a heads up on who is on the sheet etc.

 

Hope this helps

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On the original obs we just write the date it was addressed.

Then if anyone wants to check, they can look at our planning for that date.

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Guest jenpercy

We have a code to see where to find the evidence - as a purely play based provision, planning does not guarantee that the child did anything planned, or indeed if they were even there

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Hi,

I have also been thinking about this issue and have tried a number of different methods. Firstly, I tried just writing a list of next steps on the bottom of the planning sheet (and cross referenced to continuous provision or teacher-led activities as appropriate). However, we found that the next steps weren't always checked upon e.g. if the child has actually accessed the enhanced provision provided for them! So, I then created a table, similiar to the one described above, with a place for name, area of learning, next step and evaluation but again found that many were not checked upon.

So, I have now decided to have a notebook for each key person with next steps for key children each week written down & a space underneath which can be used to just date or to write an extra comment (which is now often also written on a sticky and put in journal next to long obs). This book is also used by each key person to write down evalution of teacher-led activities or any other information that needs recording e.g. behaviour patterns, friendships, etc. I have also continued to write a list of next steps at bottom of planning sheet so that everyone is aware of the other children's next step in case they are supporting their play and can meet their next step through this. I have also made sure that I am more explicit about when I want the key people to concentrate on their children for next steps as this helps to ensure that they are covered properly. The notebook system seems to be working better - I know one of my Nursery nurses prefers to write in the book as opposed to on the plans - she is much more willing to scribble down her thoughts quickly.

Hope you find a way that works for you

Green Hippo x

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The only themes/topics we do are the ones concerning healthy eating, keeping safe, and festivals etc, all other topisc/themes come from what the children are interested in, so we could have several mini topics on the go for individual children etc, these can last a week or weeks depending on interest levels. We have recently been covering the theme Change, using material from SEAD, as we have a big move coming up, so lots of changes taking place, however we have linked this into an interest several children have about 'babies' as new siblings have been born into the family, this topic naturally progressed to spring, new life and Easter.

 

Hope this helps

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We don't have whole topics. We have just asked the children for ideas of what they would like to find out about for after Easter. Then we have lots of mini topics going on that interest the children.

Brownie x

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I run a fs unit with 26 am/26 pm nursery children and 40 reception children. We also have 28 year 1 children visiting in the afternoon. To facilitate this we set up from topics which we run for a half term at a time. We obviously have continuous provision throughout the unit and will observe children and plan individuals next steps in nursery but we find it very difficult to manage. Does anybody have any ideas?

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I had a two year rolling plan of topics, which I stopped when the EYFS came in. I think the parents have found this hard as often they say 'we don't know what the children are learning anymore'.

 

I now display my plan as what is available every day eg. zoned areas for child initiated play and the adult directed activities come from the children's interests.

 

I write the childrens interests on a whiteboard which constantly changes. We then keep an evaluation sheet on how the activities we planned from their interests worked out.

 

There is less written planning to do now and we have been through an Ofsted who said it was fine.

 

So topic planning has gone out of the window and I say let the children play!

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We have a 8 week summary for each child (provided by our local LA) we record on this the childs next steps under each area of learning. We then focus on these over the next term/half term.

We are currently splitting the children into 4 weeks so that we are not trying to cover all the children every week. Then we focus on their next steps according to their 8wk summary.

 

Can I ask do you split children into groups like this?

How many next steps do you try and do for each child?- each term/half term?

 

My concern with the way we are doing things is although we are responding to observations carried out on children to enable to us get to their 8 week summary - we arent responding to everyday/ current weeks observations are we?

Also we are then trying to focus on a group of children (approx 5 aweek) and for each child we are aiming to cover all their 6 next steps in that week- (One from each area of learning from 8wk summary)

This means each child gets focused upon once every half /term.

 

Can I have your views pls?

 

Also does anyone have an individual child planning sheet they use that they might share please?

 

thanks

 

sharon

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Our next steps come from observations. How can you say how many next steps a child should have? They may be developing fine and not need particular input. Their next steps may easily be met by continuous provision. And sometimes, when you carry out the planned activity it isn't suitable. Or sometimes 3 days later they achieve it by themselves!

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Our Early years rep recently suggested trying a new approach to obs and next steps as our paperwork was getting out of hand. She suggeseted writing down all obs on a sheet (per child) for a half term period. Then using an A4 piece of paper, divided into the 6 areas of learning, pick out from the obs specific 'next steps' to move their learning on. Sounds a lot less paper work in theory and saves copying obs into different sections of the learning journey. Photos can be used in the same way. Number references can be put against each observation/picture which can then easily tie up with next steps and achieved development points. Although next steps often happen 'there and then' with adult support, it is always a good opportunity to extend their thinking further at a later stage.

 

dottyp

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I have joined today and read your replies with great interest. It is a kind of relief to hear other people are feeling the same as myself.

 

I am a nursery teacher with one nursery nurse in a separate nursery building with 26 a.m. children and 26p.m. children. (six children in nappies!!!!)

Our continuous provision is set up broadly around topic areas but giving a wide scope for different choices.

 

Is anyone else in this situation as it is proving difficult to plan for all the children's interests. (what about if children have not had a great deal of experience

and therefore develop an interest around 'the topic' that they wouldn't have known about)

 

Some people have said that they concentrate on a few children a week - what about the others e.g. if they are not until week 5.

 

Some people have said that they plan for certain aspects so all the areas are covered over the year. My children start attending at different times therefore

there is a group ready for school and some only 3. I am getting all worried that the children won't have everything 'ticked off' as it were.

We fill in their achievements on a computer programme which feeds into the Profile score and shows whether the children are on track on not!!!!

Therefore there is SOME pressure to ensure children achieve whether it is their interest or not in some cases.

 

I have also been reading about the PLODS but similar to another person I have not been able to find the section on the EYFS cd.

 

PLEASE PLEASE help

 

Karen Carver

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