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What Can The Government Do To Recruit More Men In The Early Years?


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Research findings - thought i'd share with you all :+)

 

I know there have been specific initiatives been implemented but none of these have seemed to work as the early years is predominately made up of women. From researching this area, the most fundamental attributes to arise was 1) stereotypical attitudes and fears of abuse and paedophilia. I was astounded when i evaluated my findings, it's such a shame society ostracises individuals for choosing a particular career

 

This is a very controversial topic and i'd love to hear your opinions on the matter :o

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I'm surprised you were surprised, Happydays1!

 

It may be an urban myth but if this is the same society that saw an angry mob attacked someone in their own home because they didn't understand the difference between a paediatrician and a paedophile, then I can well imagine that this might be a barrier for attracting men into the workforce.

 

However your sentence is very broad, and needs to be unpicked, I think. Whose views are seen as stereotypical - parents, employers, potential employees? Who fears abuse and paedophilia? Is our society actually ostracising people for their choice of profession, or is this your respondees' perception?

 

Maz

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When a predominantly female workforce still think having another adult present during nappy chaning, tolieting, or if looking at bumps and knocks anywhere below the waist, its hardly surprising that men feel it isnt a place they want to be in.

As a country, we've scared ourselves, literally, senseless :o

Edited by Rea
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Although I do agree that all professions benefit from the different point of views brought by men and women, I do worry that early years actually also suffers from the attitude that it is not really a profession of any real worth BECAUSE men do not often choose it. If a predominantly female job was valued equally then more men would want to become part of it, despite any stereotypes.

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Rea is absolutely right about the whole paranoia about abuse thing.

 

But actually I wonder if men are put off as much by the practicalities, i.e. the fact that the pay is still so poor and that it is often a part time job?

 

From my experiences of working in primary schools, I do come across more men than I used to, although still they tend to be in KS2 rather than KS1. Things are changing, though, just as they are changing in the home, where the man is far more likely now to be involved in childcare.

 

Also, once in the sector, men tend to want to progress to a promoted post, so you quickly lose them from the classroom anyway.

 

Sadly, these things take time. I would be absolutely made up if a man applied for our current vacancy!

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Guest jenpercy

well one thing is for sure, the idea that making everyone do more qualifications to drive up pay and hence attract men as I read was gov strategy won't work. If I could afford to pay more, I would and wuld be top of the queue for myself as I take home less than my Supervisor for more hours, being merely the poor owner manager

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I also think it is about pay and conditions. Running a pre-school with no pension. £9 pay an hour, only paid term-time just doesn't compare with jobs where you can get company cars, gym membership, BUPA etc.

 

Sadly, I think a lot of parents are still a bit wary of a man changing their child's nappy in a care environment and men are probably more likely to be accepted into the EY sector at a pre-school age group, running forest schools or as artists in residence. men are very accepted as youth workers so it is something to do with the 'care' element I think.

 

I would just love a man in our setting but I also think it is hard for them to be the only man and works better if there are more than one. You also have to watch out for the female staff's attitude. I know when I was teaching we had some men teaching in KS1 but if a Reception child wet themselves the expectation from the whole school would be that the male teacher's female LSA would deal with it whereas the parallel female Reception teacher might deal with it herself.

 

It also really annoys me that at a Primary school level parents perceive the men to be in charge. I have been in many meetings as a manager where the parents expect the male teacher to be leading proceedings when in fact it is me. men certainly progress up the primary career ladder faster than women even when they are not so knowledgable/experienced.

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I definitely think a mixed gender staff at our preschool would improve things, sorry but all women together can be a recipe for troubles, just as all male would be.

 

I guess involving dads is a key way in which we can try and improve this.

 

It's interesting about the pay and conditions. Presumably there are men out there who have similar qualification levels to my staff, i.e. NVQ rather than having done A level/university route. But they choose to go into things like building rather than childcare, which presumably have similar pay rates.

 

It's a fascinating discussion.

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