Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Mucking Around During Cil?


 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

every week we are finding that during CIL some children seem to spend there time running around the classroom with lego models or generally just mucking around not doing much. We spend a lot of time ensuring that we make all resources available, as well as put out new fun activities for the children to take part in and interesting tuff spots etc but we are finding that a lot of children are not spending their time learning. At times we feel as though CIL is a bit of a free for all where some children are not gaining anything. We are a boy heavy year group with 15 girls to 33 boys, i'm not sure whether this may make a difference?

 

Does anyone have any ideas as to how to make this time more valuable for children and adults?

 

many thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is one of the problems with how you interpret free play. With such a big group and so many boys, I think you need to take charge and put some kind of order on who does what and for how long.

 

My son's teacher (mixed R/Y1/Y2 class) does this using what she calls planning boards. There is one for each of the 6 areas, and children have to velcro their names up when they choose an activity. This means she can limit the numbers and ensure that children cover all the different areas over time.

 

Hope that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably a daft question, but have you tried playing alongside the children and modelling the kind of play they might do. I sometimes find children need this, because they just don't really understand what they could be doing. I've always found them continuing things we've done together then in there own play later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is one of the problems with how you interpret free play. With such a big group and so many boys, I think you need to take charge and put some kind of order on who does what and for how long.

 

My son's teacher (mixed R/Y1/Y2 class) does this using what she calls planning boards. There is one for each of the 6 areas, and children have to velcro their names up when they choose an activity. This means she can limit the numbers and ensure that children cover all the different areas over time.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Is it really CI if the teacher directs who and when?

Surely the children are learning when they are playing at running and mucking about? Sharing ideas, a story, resources.

Could you ask them what their game is? How does it start, end. Are their any main charcters? Whats the lego used for, how did they make it?

Do they just need more time outside runing off some energy? Give them shovels and brooms and get them to clear the playground. :o

Edited by Rea
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it really CI if the teacher directs who and when?

 

Quick answer is no it isn't it's adult directed.

 

I wrote this definition down at a conference (NAA speaker)

 

It is not truly CI when adults

set an agenda or suggest what children are to do

send children to a particular area

limit what they can use

organise GROUPS to "play" together

limit the time children can spend in an area

rotate groups around provision

 

When children are initiating their own learning they decide

where to go

what to do within boundaries of expectaions of behaviour

who to collaborate with

how long to be there within the boundaries of the day

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have the same problem no matter what resources are available certain children only ever choose the same activity. Am now being told by pedagogue that we're not showing enough progress but if children don't choose to write or use numbers etc and only achieve these things in AI activities how can we show progress. I also have the problem of being on my own for most of the day with 30 children so making observations is really difficult.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have the same problem no matter what resources are available certain children only ever choose the same activity.

Isn't this evidence that children are 'wallowing' in an experience and honing and developing their skills? Perhaps one way of encouraging children to develop their ideas even further might be to introduce new resources/props so that whilst they are wallowing they can extend their thinking? Sally Thomas advocates the 80/20 rule - 80% familiar, 20% new. So if a child moves no further from the hollow blocks most of the time, the adult can skilfully encourage the child to grow and develop by carefully selecting new resources, and retiring those that offer less challenge or are not being played with as readily/frequently as before.

 

Thanks for the definition of Child Initiated Marion - you've come up trumps again!

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)