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Does Your Leader, Lead?


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To those of you in sessional pre-school/playgroups this may seem like a silly question, but does your leader really pull the staff together, advise on what the assistants should be doing, deal with the parents, committee etc

 

Can you really tell who is the leader when you walk into your setting?

Or

Is it a joint effort with everyone involved with everything that's going on, and no 1 person seems to be above another?

 

Can you tell there maybe something not quite right!!!!!!!!

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We have recently had a leader who you probably wouldn't call a 'leader' she was helped greatly by her deputy and the committee.

 

It is very hard isn't it as a committee when you are unhappy with the leadership of the setting.

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Mmmm...... I really feel for the staff, however the Committee would probably just be seen as causing trouble if they did say anything, and also with the rate of pay that the leader gets it's too much work really for the leader alone.

 

All the staff are actually qualified to the same level so there is no 1 person who is really 'reaching for the stars' and driving the setting, so to speak.

 

Does that make sense?

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Having worked in a sessional pre-school, both as worker and leader, I must say that there is something to be said for both approaches.

Where there is no obvious 'leader' figure, it's good that all staff pull together and offer their own expertise. Where there IS an obvious 'leader', then someone is at the helm, hopefully encouraging the team to fulfil themselves and contribute, as well as responding to new regulations and initiatives as they come along.

The problems arise when there is no obvious 'leader' and no real teamworking. Even if everyone is qualified to the same level (I am assuming Level 3??), if everyone is waiting for someone else to take the lead, then you're going nowhere!!

 

Sue

 

PS, I have deleted your duplicate post

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Answer to the Thread:

 

NO :oxD:(

 

 

Hence my decision to become a leader again...in September...a setting needs a leader - I think anyway!

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I was leader / manager of such a setting, and feel that yes I did lead, guide and deal with parents, committee and everything else included.

we too were all same level, and while I did all of these things, when walking into the setting it was not obvious who was in charge and we all dealt with issues as they arose, but all parents knew who the leader was and would often ask for me.

 

They all had their own roles, and we used their strengths as much as we could, they all had their own area of responsibility

 

BUT I did lead and push forward... taking the responsibiliy for doing so, liaising with both committee and staff etc..

 

 

 

Unless you have the confidence it is hard to be leader of staff all at same level.. there is, I found, a fine line between leading and 'bossing' (for want of a better word) I had to earn their respect for them to feel able to accept my lead.

 

perhaps a detailed job description with all that is needed be drawn up for each member of staff.. detailing exactly what they are to do / what you expect of them

 

 

Inge

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Is there something which you can identify should be happening but isn't?

 

Is there someone leading the practice in the group, introducing new ideas, identifying what needs to improve, comparing what is happening in the setting with recognised good practice.

 

There are lots of aspects tot he leadership role and they don't have to be done by anyone in particular as long as someone is doing it.

 

If these things are happening and you can't see anything missing I wouldn't worry too much about it.

 

Maybe each member of staff is leading the bit they are best at which can be a recipe for success.

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Having worked in a sessional pre-school, both as worker and leader, I must say that there is something to be said for both approaches.

Where there is no obvious 'leader' figure, it's good that all staff pull together and offer their own expertise. Where there IS an obvious 'leader', then someone is at the helm, hopefully encouraging the team to fulfil themselves and contribute, as well as responding to new regulations and initiatives as they come along.

The problems arise when there is no obvious 'leader' and no real teamworking. Even if everyone is qualified to the same level (I am assuming Level 3??), if everyone is waiting for someone else to take the lead, then you're going nowhere!!

 

Sue

 

PS, I have deleted your duplicate post

 

 

Thanks for deleting the duplicate post don't know how that happened!

 

I'm afraid you have got us down to a tee, yes everyone level 3 but everyone waiting for someone else do something which always seems to be me - not the leader!

 

Ah well last day tomorrow

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Is there something which you can identify should be happening but isn't?

 

Is there someone leading the practice in the group, introducing new ideas, identifying what needs to improve, comparing what is happening in the setting with recognised good practice.

 

Yes me, but I don't have enough hours in my day to do everything and know there is a lot more that needs to be done, bringing it up at meetings doesn't get anywhere.

Edited by thumperrabbit
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That must be so frustrating.

 

The children are lucky to have you there.

 

It sounds like you need some backing to help redress the balance. Do you feel able to bring it up in a quiet conversation with the chair which could lead to a staff meeting to discuss team roles?

 

Enjoy your summer and come back with renewed vigour for next term. You never know what might happen over the summer.

 

I hope things improve for you soon and remember how much the children are benefitting from your leadership!

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I am the leader in my setting and have a brilliant team, however the brilliant team didnt happen by osmosis, I had to work really hard at gaining their trust and support. I have brought in many changes since my three years in post and would say I led by example, there isnt any job that i would delegate without first being seen doing it myself (even cleaning the toilets, when needs be).

 

I think what makes us successful and my leadership enjoyable is that all staff have a voice, something I found difficult to achieve when I wasnt a leader in another setting, it was made very clear to me then, how not to lead, so when I eventually became a leader I set about empowering the staff, whilst still maintaining clear job descriptions and roles and why these were neccessary. We all plan together weekly, reflect at the end of each session and write these reflections up in our setting reflective diary.

We have non contact time for assessing, I monitor all or our assessing and observe the staff's interactions with the children, for example I will sit in on small group times and feedback to staff, however I ensure the deputy observes me and sits in some of my small groups and feeds back as well.

 

Since taking joining the setting as lead, we have taken our provision from satisfactory to good overall with outstanding for partnerships with parents. Our committee is brilliant and they understand that they are there to support. A member of staff always sits in on committee meetings and feedsback to staff, to date we have never had a problem, I do think its because we are so clear, open and honest about our roles and responsibilities.

 

Sorry for the ramble

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Im the leader of a sessional preschool and when I first started I tried to be "incharge" and ended up carrying all the burdens of the session alone but then I stepped back and delegated the roles and responcibilities to the team Im more in the background these days but I step in and take charge when final decisions are needed, in general I try to leave the staff to do as much for themselves as possible.

 

If I was you I would go to the commitee and explain your dissatisfaction about the quality of leadership, I know you possibly dont want to be the leader but maybe if you where leader you could draw up action plans and delegate the tasks that you dont have time to do instead of picking up the slack alone.

 

staff meetings I find are the biggest waste of time lots gets said and less gets done, I think a better alternative to meetings is to go armed with an action plan, list the issues that need addressing, discuss the solution for each issue with the team and pin a member of staff to each action and "say your the person who can oversee that it gets done." share the burden and that way each member of staff is involved normally asking members of staff to deal with issues that are their strengths, maybe that could help to get the staff back on track?

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staff meetings I find are the biggest waste of time lots gets said and less gets done, I think a better alternative to meetings is to go armed with an action plan, list the issues that need addressing, discuss the solution for each issue with the team and pin a member of staff to each action and "say your the person who can oversee that it gets done." share the burden and that way each member of staff is involved normally asking members of staff to deal with issues that are their strengths, maybe that could help to get the staff back on track?

 

I agree that staff meetings are a waste of time. I like your altenative.

 

smiles

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