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Eyfs - Uk


qu1dzy
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Where is the EYFS statutory within the UK.

Do you mean geographically? Or within certain settings? Or the age group of children? Sorry - am having a senior moment here... :o

 

I don't think anyone is exempt from implementing the EYFS - although parents can ask for an exemption for their children but I don't know how many actually have.

 

Maz

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Not just you Maz,

 

was just about to post asking for more detail,

 

I was wondering if net was abroad somewhere which would make the question more relevant, but notice location as Bedfordshire.

 

as you said thought it was statutory for all UK but willing to be proved wrong.

 

Do Wales and Scotland have own versions..

 

I believe Wales has a higher ratio of 1:8 through all FS , reception included.

 

Inge

Edited by Inge
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I believe it is statutory for registered providers of early years education and childcare from 0 - 5 years in England. As I understand it, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own version - but please correct me!!

 

Sue

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I believe it is statutory for registered providers of early years education and childcare from 0 - 5 years in England.

I thought I would have a look at the EYFS and see what it says but I couldn't find a statement to the equivalent of what you said, Sue! However in the glossary of the Statutory Framework, I did find the definition of a 'provider':-

 

Subject to certain exemptions, all other types of provision for children aged from birth to the end of August following their fifth birthday, including any provision made for children under the age of three by maintained or independent schools, must be registered by Ofsted.

 

So I guess one amendment to your description could be "for children from birth to 31st August following their fifth birthday". In other words, when they go into a year one class.

 

But I suppose that isn't quite as catchy, is it? :o

 

Maz

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Agree England only, but being pedantic with words and how they are interpretated; EYFS is not statutory in that a setting can deliver any curriculum, they just won't get registered with Ofsted. It is the registration with Ofsted that is statutory, and not the EYFS. A bit chicken and egg. When this was all coming into play I argued the point that basically we have got a stautaory curriculum for the under 5's just as we have in maintained schools in the National Curriculum, it's just that EYFS has been made mandatory by default. (Hope that makes sense) This made me cross because I didn't want a 'statutory curriculum' for under 5's, I wanted freedom of choice for parents, they don't have this now. :o

 

Peggy

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Agree England only, but being pedantic with words and how they are interpretated; EYFS is not statutory in that a setting can deliver any curriculum, they just won't get registered with Ofsted.

That's interesting Peggy - the Statutory Framework talks about the EYFS being given legal force, and the legal requirements relating to welfare etc. And not all settings that have to now deliver the EYFS are actually registered with Ofsted - independent schools for example.

 

Its a complicated business, isn't it? :o

 

Maz

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That's interesting Peggy - the Statutory Framework talks about the EYFS being given legal force, and the legal requirements relating to welfare etc. And not all settings that have to now deliver the EYFS are actually registered with Ofsted - independent schools for example.

 

Its a complicated business, isn't it? :o

 

Maz

 

Yes, quite agree it is complicated.

I was focusing more on the 'learning' curriculum rather than welfare requirements. Didn't know about Independent schools not being registered with Ofsted, how are they regulated to welfare standards?

 

I meant everyday preschools etc are now not able to have the freedom to choose to opt out of the EYFS (curriculum requirements, which are quite prescriptive) which does reduce parental choice of what kind of 'education' their under 5's is exposed to. Also the fact that the funding is only attached to EYFS settings, what if I wanted to provide a purely creative experience setting for under 5's with no emphasis on say phonics or ICT, I couldn't do it, would such a setting be 'bad' for a preschooler? Whatever our thoughts, the 'choice' is not there for anyone who would like such a setting for their child.

 

Peggy

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I was focusing more on the 'learning' curriculum rather than welfare requirements.

The learning and development sections also have legal status Peggy. The Statutory Framework says:-

 

"This document contains the statutory framework for the EYFS. It sets out the legal requirements relating to learning and development (the early learning goals; the educational programmes; and the assessment arrangements) in Section 2 and the legal requirements relating to welfare (safeguarding and promoting children’s welfare; suitable people; suitable premises, environment and equipment; organisation; and documentation) in Section 3. The learning and development requirements are given legal force by the Early Years Foundation Stage (Learning and Development Requirements) Order 2007 made under Section 39 (1) (a) of the Childcare Act 2006."

 

Like it or not the EYFS is here to stay, and so far I have to say I like it. I hear what you say about parental choice - but the minute Government started funding pre-school education I think it became inevitable that they would start asking questions about quality and standards. Of course the whole thing is a big experiment, to an extent and we'll only find out how successful it is a long way down the line. I just hope I'm around to pass judgement at that point!

 

Maz

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Sorry, it was a very rushed post, in a very short break at uni.

 

I meant is it statutory in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

 

If not, has it been adapted by the other countries or do they have something totally different. I have been looking on the Scotland website and found a curriculum dated 2002 but was unsure if this got changed like the rest of us.

 

 

 

Net x

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Sorry, it was a very rushed post, in a very short break at uni.

 

I meant is it statutory in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

 

If not, has it been adapted by the other countries or do they have something totally different. I have been looking on the Scotland website and found a curriculum dated 2002 but was unsure if this got changed like the rest of us.

 

 

 

Net x

 

At the present time Scotland is still using it's 3-5 Curriculum Framework. This is being replaced, as Marion says, by the Curriculum for Excellence (was meant to have been rolled out by now but is taking longer than they anticipated!) which goes from 3-18. :o

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