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Stages Of Play


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Hi all

 

I want to have alook at the children in my setting and see how I can help to develop from an early stage of play (solitary) to more / parallel co-operative play.

 

Wondered if any of you clever people out there have done anything like this, either as part of some study or as a school based project.

 

I work in a nursery.

 

Any help/links would be very helpful.

 

Thanks in anticipation.

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did a quick google and found these:

 

HERE

 

a note about the progress through the stages to consider, Quote It is important to note that children differ widely according to birth order within their own families. Boys and girls develop in different areas at different stages of their life, so there is never complete adherence to any of these exact ages. Not all children move through the stages at the same rate, because children who have more life experiences tend to emerge as leaders or organizers at younger ages. Confidence, shyness, and other personality traits factor into these stages of play.

 

QUOTE FROM HERE

 

Theoretical perspectives HERE

 

I think it is about really knowing your children, their diverse personalities, their social dispositions, their communication skills.

Offering an holistic approach at childrens own pace as they explore these social and intellectual stages. Offering the correct resources to encourage solo, paired, group play. To provide adult role models in communication at all levels. To scaffold childrens interactions. To recognise leaders and followers, confident and shy and support and empower accordingly.

 

Peggy

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did a quick google and found these:

 

HERE

 

a note about the progress through the stages to consider, Quote It is important to note that children differ widely according to birth order within their own families. Boys and girls develop in different areas at different stages of their life, so there is never complete adherence to any of these exact ages. Not all children move through the stages at the same rate, because children who have more life experiences tend to emerge as leaders or organizers at younger ages. Confidence, shyness, and other personality traits factor into these stages of play.

 

QUOTE FROM HERE

 

Theoretical perspectives HERE

 

I think it is about really knowing your children, their diverse personalities, their social dispositions, their communication skills.

Offering an holistic approach at childrens own pace as they explore these social and intellectual stages. Offering the correct resources to encourage solo, paired, group play. To provide adult role models in communication at all levels. To scaffold childrens interactions. To recognise leaders and followers, confident and shy and support and empower accordingly.

 

Peggy

 

 

Thank you Peggy prompt and infomative as always. :o

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I would also add that children can often play co-operatively in an area but only solitarily (?sp) in another, depending on their level of development and concentration.

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You could try scaffolding their play in conjunction with one other child, like we do with ASD children. It only works when they are ready and equipped to do it. If they're not interested then no amount of work on your side will do anything

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I don't know whether this would be of any use at all - it's called the "Social Continuum of Play" and splits the development of co-operative play into four domains. It is meant to be used as an assessment tool for observing and assessing children's social development through play.

 

http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/0415303...df/4domains.pdf

 

It's written about at length by Pat Broadhead in a book called Early Years Play and Learning if you want to know more - I just thought it might be useful to glance at for your study?

Edited by Wolfie
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