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Jolly Stories


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Hi there,

 

I've been studying the Jolly Phonic scheme in some detail (for a showery summers afternoon !) and am slightly confused. In the 'Jolly Stories' book to support speaking and listening for example snake is spelt as 's n ai k' and rabbit, as 'r a b i t' and arrow as 'a r oa' I'm not sure about this approach !

 

I would prefer to use the correct spelling for displays but does this defeat the purpose? I have been teaching the letters and sounds using the correct spelling in EYFS and changing would surely confuse both children and adults. I think it is logical to teach the correct spellings from the start. JP is only used in our FS so there is no progression of such spellings for year one or beyond.

 

Btw, I would recommend Jolly Stories, it is a great way into the daily phonic lesson. I would be grateful for any advice, explaination or experience from those who have taught this scheme for a number of years. Many thanks

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We always use the correct spelling for teaching and displays with our Jolly Phonics work

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The previous post has been removed - please can members remember to post in a positive and helpful way so as not to cause offence. :o

 

Beau

 

Interesting! So I take it you don't like this scheme :+) Fair enough but I have to use it in my school. We can add to this scheme which I am doing and find this works. It is what we put in that makes it worth while. It is one way and therefore I'm happy to use my imagination, creativity and intelligence to teach phonics this way. The children enjoy it and progress. Jolly phonics didn't make that much sense and Jolly Stories help, at least now I have an understanding of how the authors would introduce the sounds. I'd be interested to know what you use, thanks

D

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I've used Jolly Phonics since there were first published (1993? now I feel really old :o ) and was fortunate to have some training with Sue Lloyd. Because it is multi sensory it really engages the children as Susan says and accommodates different learning styles. (Little Johnny can get up and do the actions before he gets too fidgety and then sit back down and listen for another 5 mins xD ). I have to say I'm not a huge fan of the reading books or the video/DVD but like any materials you need to be selective and adapt, adopt or discard for your own purposes.

Perhaps you could use the spellings in the book to introduce the alternative ways of representing the sounds

sometimes we write /ai/ /a-e/ so we don't write /s/ /n/ /ai/ /k/ we write /s/ /n/ /a/ /k/ /e/

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We asked our local primary school before choosing a scheme and they suggested Jolly Phonics - although interestingly they use Read Write Ink (or is it Inc?).

 

As has been said, our pre-schoolers love to make the actions whilst making the sounds - and they do seem to stick in their heads!

 

Maz

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I agree- Jolly phonics is fantastic. The children love it and it is a brillant multi-sensory approach. I agree with Marion about the reading books and DVD (I was horrified when watching the DVD to hear them mis-pronouncing one or two phonemes!). But the actions, stories and songs are fab!

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I'm a great fan of JP

 

I've used many schemes through the years.Started in schools using 'Pictogram' which was black and white which eventually became Letterland when colour was added.I still use some of the story tips from pictogram to explain how some letters are formed.

 

Then we used the sentence strip thing with the standing folders of words when 'seeing the whole word' was in-forgot what it was called

 

Then we had 'real books' for learning to read in context

 

Then reading recovery came in and we were told to ditch letterland and sentence stands.I agreed with the argument that bright children will pick it up whatever the scheme but the lower ablity children picked up the characters but didn't make the cross over or link to the phoneme and still struggled.

 

we've used other stuff along the way too

 

Jolly phonics of all the approaches it seems to have the widest possible success rate with the widest range of ablilties which makes it suitable for 'large groups'.There will always be children who struggle or exceed but we as professionals know that and provide for those children.It's ideal for non-professionals or those with high qualifications to give imput which is consistant.

 

We had a VERY sceptical year 1 key stage 1 co-ordinator teacher last year of over 30 year experience.The children she was receiving were the first co-hort to have been introduced to JP in nursery and followed on in reception and we urged her to carry it on. "waving hands to sounds never helped anyone"

 

At our last staff meeting the head reviewed achivement .This teacher said the spelling, writing and reading was the best she'd ever experienced (and it was not a bright year group) due to the grounding and knowledge of phonemes the children had arrived with.She could not sing the praises of the system high enough although she stop short of an apology for the hassle she put us through to use it :o

 

Like ALL schemes for ANYTHING-wirting, number, PE I would never use it in isolation and only pick out what I think is of value.

 

I do think some of the drawings are twee xD but we only show the big book with the pictures when we initially introduce a phoneme and from then on a promt card is enough.

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thanks to everyone who has contributed so far, I'm so grateful for your input and super pleased I renewed my subscription with fsf! I am interested to see where I can go with this through other areas of the curriculum and reveiw compare next years results. Enjoy what is left of the hols.

Dx

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