Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Who Observes?!


 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all, I'm obviously having an argumentative week!! Having asked you about worksheets, I'd now like to hear how other settings manage their observations!

 

I was quite shocked to learn recently that some of our staff studying level 2 (CPP) are not taught how to observe, and therefore, understandably, are very uncomfortable about recording observations as they haven't been trained in the correct procedures. Apparently they're not trained until they study at level 3 (DPP)

 

How does everyone else manage this, do all staff observe the children, or just those that have been trained? And does that then mean that only trained staff can be keyworkers?!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was assessing students on the level 2 course, i would always ask them to observe a child, althouhg this wasn't part of the course, and I introduced Theorists, slowly, so I didn't frighten them away! :o and I must say that the majority of the students coped very well :) My thought being that the more they did on the level two, the more they could cross reference to level three! Making my job a whole lot easier!!! :(xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The setting I work in had only two qualified staff ( 1 NNEB and 1 NVQ3) at present 3 of us are undertaking the NVQ3 and 1 other will remain unqualified.

 

However ALL of us have undertaken observation training, so are therefire able to observe the children.

 

In fact all of the staff regardless of qualification or lack of undertake as much training as we can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the secret lies in having very clear objectives for what you are observing. They should come from the planning/planned curriculum. If for example you are working on "jump off an object and land appropriately" then your activities would give you the context for your observations. You can then identify children who find this easy and look at what they need to do to extend themselves or move on to the next steps and children who need more of this kind of experience to develop their skills/knowledge/understanding. Assessment for learning as it says in "Excellence and enjoyment" Alongside this of course you have your "Aha moments" or significant things; the child who writes something for the first time etc. These would also be noted and added to the child's record of achievement. Overall though I think observations need to be systematic and planned for. It's easy to lose some children in the mix if this is not the case!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry I'm on my soapbox again. My NNEB might be 20 years old but I WAS taught about observations. I feel quite capable about doing them but perhaps after 20 years I should have forgotten !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hotgoss,

I don't know if you've seen it, but this week's Nursery World carries an article re old Qualifications, APEL and NVQ, as well as a reply from someone who has heard from Richard Dorrance on this matter. No time now, but I could give you a resume after weekend if you want?

 

Sue :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)