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Emotional Literacy


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Hi everyone, i have a question to ask---do you think you need to be emotionally literate to be academically successful and if so why?

Now there's a little teaser to get your head round on a cold miserable day.

Nearly finished my HONS- writing the dissertation has been so hard.

louise x

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Hi

 

I would like to think that a child who has developed good EL(nature/nurture?) would be in a good position to develop well academically. However, what about adults/children that have Aspergers and yet are high achievers academically?

 

Sam

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I also did the test and am below average, :o .

A terrible thought for a sunday morning ( only kidding).

Sometimes things we do or dont do are to save other people and us from emotional heartache.

(is that a bit deep).

Anyway im now off to watch my daughter play football, lets hope we have a win or there will be 13 ,13year olds emotional.

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Hi everyone thanks for the reply. I have a theory that being emotionally literate in an area of social deprivation, is more than likely going to help children achieve more academically as ir will enable them to be more resillient in dealing with what life has to offer. Yes children that have auspergers can be academic, but generally only in one area, not as an all rounder and indeed these children although they have the qualifications, find it hard to make use of them.

Anyway, i guess we won't know until these cohort of children being taught in school now how to be emotionally literate have reached the GSCE level and are leaving school.

Louise

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Louise, on another thread that I started yesterday under "Children's Centres", I gave a brief explanation of a new assessment scale that Bertram and Pascal are developing called the AcE scale. It very much links into what you are saying - they were quoting recent research which points to the importance of emotional well being and qualities such as perseverance and resilience as a prerequisite for any child developing into a successful learner.

 

I've linked the page about the scale in question

 

http://crec.co.uk/index.php?option=com_con...7&Itemid=34

 

I think you'll find it very interesting if you haven't come across it already!

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My head is very big on Daniel Goleman's theories of Emotional Intelligence

 

http://quiz.ivillage.co.uk/uk_work/tests/eqtest.htm

 

 

Thanks for that Marion, first time I tried I scored below average 45%, then I asked my husband to do it ( quite a few of our responses were the same, although for number 3 Hubby said "phone my mobile" :o ), he scored 70% (averageEQ) Then I re-took it and scored 75% (average EQ).

 

 

Peggy

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Hi everyone, i have a question to ask---do you think you need to be emotionally literate to be academically successful and if so why?

Now there's a little teaser to get your head round on a cold miserable day.

Nearly finished my HONS- writing the dissertation has been so hard.

louise x

 

 

Congratulations on nearly finishing your dissertation. xD ( I bow to thee in admiration)

 

I personally feel that you need to define the term 'success' to answer your question. A highly academic person, high earner etc, but not emotionally stable compared to an emaotional stable person with low IQ and lower earnings ???? That is of course if you measure success with earnings then IQ wins..................or does it?

 

There is another thread on the forum about 'creativity, does school squash this, a vidoe presentation questions the value of academic IQ........ One valid point the speaker makes is that a degree is less valued now, needing an MA to be valued as academic compared to years ago when a degree meant something...........................

 

(my ......................mean 'pause for thought)

 

 

I wonder whether your research has shown a gender difference in attainment of EQ, which begs another question, Do you attain EQ or is it part nature?.......................................

 

 

Research / study, isn't it fascinating, and thank you for posting this subject which has enabled me to have an evening ( or part of) of deep thinking, which I always enjoy and thankfully am happy to leave with inconclusive thoughts.

 

Now, there's another question, if. like me, you over analyse everything, does that make me have a lower or higher EQ, me thinks a lower one. :o

 

Peggy

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just another thought....

as far as children and disposition to learning goes, I think that EQ is very important, that's if I understand it correctly, the focus on PSE, as many practitioners have argued over the years, should have as equal a weighting as maths, literacy and science.

 

If a child is not emotionally secure he/she will not be as receptive to learning as a child who is. One main evidence of this is the underachievement of foster children.

 

Peggy

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Peggy, if you ever get the chance to listen to Chris Pascal and Tony Bertram talk on this subject, grab it! xD

 

 

Thanks for that Wolfie, I'll keep my ears and eyes open to their next seminar on the subject. :o

 

Peggy

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Just got a flyer from Early excellence and Chris is speaking at their Early Years conference ... and I'm going! :o

 

Looking Closely at Assessment for Learning

The keynote presentations will be provided by:

Professor Chris Pascal, Centre for Research in Early Childhood, Birmingham

Wendy Lee, Education Consultant, New Zealand

Karen Ramsey, Headteacher, Roskill South Centre of Innovation, New Zealand

Jan Dubiel, Principal Early Years Officer, National Assessment Agency

Edited by Marion
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Just got a flyer from Early excellence and Chris is speaking at their Early Years conference ... and I'm going! :o

Ooh Marion you lucky thing! Jan Dubiel came to talk to us last year about assessing for the Profile - quite a controversial character with very strong views. And since he's the head of Early Years at the National Assessment Agency, his views carry a lot of weight! See if he talks about the 'Betty' point... Chris Pascal is truly inspirational, too - she came to launch the EEL project in our Borough last year.

 

I wish I could afford it...

 

Maz

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Bertram and Pascal are also at Early Excellence in March, presenting a course for Children's Centre management about engaging the most excluded families...and I'm going!! I agree though, Maz, those courses aren't very affordable - I'm very lucky to be going.

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