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Everything Goes In His Mouth


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We have a 3 year old that comes come a very disturbed home. He has 2 other siblings aged 4 & 5.

He is very angry goes round knocking down chairs when he gets tired. towards the end of the session. That's not too much of a problem because he responds to a cuddle. Absolutely everything goes in his mouth. Whilst I don't want to encourage this how do i meet his needs. Does he just have to work through the oral stage. When we see children putting play food, toys or dough in their mouths we tell them not to do it and explain why then get them to wash/wipe the toy themselves or throw the soggy dough in the bin.

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Why should he be treated any differently to the others? Its not safe to put things in the mouth, is it and unless he has some SEN issues that make that difficult to keep to, he should be discouraged from doing this?

Perhaps this is the child that needs a dummy at preschool---could this be the reason?

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I'd treat him the same as the others too. Coming from a disturbed home shouldnt give him any preferential treatment, hard though it can be when you know home life is kak.

He might just stop it over time, I work with a girl who eats the paint, dough, pens, even knaws the wooden window sill. Its decreased slowley but she still sucks the paint brushes occasionally. She is always told its dirty, she'll get a bad tummy, it tastes yak but just wants the taste, feel, sensation.

:o

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I would treat as a delayed sensory development & emotional need.However I would like to add a note of caution.I once had a child who progressively tasted/ate more and more items in nursery.It started with usual toys etc but became more organic but weirder and it appeared she never 'learnt'-salt dough, gravel, sand, soil, shaving foam.One morning she couldn't walk down the garden path to come to nursery because her legs didn't work.She was then diagnosed with leukemia.It was as if her body was trying to find the elements it needed or were missing.She was treated successfully and is now a teenager.

I'm not indicating that your child could be ill but the incident makes me watch children who are tasters just to observe that its within the realms of 'normal' and that they learn from it ie.soap.

 

Sensory seeker is a great phrase. Does that include a child I have at the moment who likes a soft part of my body :o

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I've got a child (Reception) who is the same (he's ASD). It was getting to the point that he was in danger of choking.

 

I wrote him a very simple social story with photographs, to visually explain that we use the mouth for speaking etc, eating food and drinking. (we had to physically do a sorting exercise to work out what was food and drink and what wasn't!)

 

I sent a copy home to his parents to reinforce at home and it seems to have worked. He puts things in his mouth very occasionally (it used to be at least 6 times a day.)

 

Don't know if this would be appropriate for you!

 

Good luck anyway

 

 

Moo

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I have exactly the same problem. The little boy in question is 4yrs old and is constantly testing the boundaries within the classroom but alongside his behaviour issues he is forever putting equipment (bobbins, pens, lego, erasers etc) in his mouth and really chews on them. His new thing is to scrunch up paper towels or tissue and chew. He also picks up things off the floor to chew. Hes not hungry we do feed him! last week it was a poor worm that nearly ended up in his mouth luckily we spotted it in time. But I have to say it is driving me crazy we have to be on alert as to where is in the room and what he has in his mouth. I have spoken to his parents and they are really supportive although I have my suspicions that he has his dummy at home more than they are letting on! so i can totally sympathise with your problem and i am hoping he grows out of it soon, VERY soon!

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Hi Linnet and welcome. Thanks for making your first post.

 

I have a little boy of 4 who is causing me much concern with his erratic and unpredicatable behaviour but he doesnt thankfully put things in his mouth! I had a little boy last year whose mother continually complained about hygiene in school as she said her son had continual tummy upsets and then I saw him licking the door frames!!

Hope your little chap stops soon!

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We had a little boy who ate paper towels, soap, toilet roll, PVA glue etc. We had a large cardboard box that used to sit near his group table with a dolls house in it. It wasn't until he left and we were moving that it was pulled out and 2/3 of the side was completely missing!! I still see his parents and he grew out of it eventually!!

 

Shiny

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This thread rang a bell and I've found an old post with something which might be of use: Chewy tubes!

http://www.kapitex.com/index.page.php?page...hewytubes-intro

 

You can find the posts here. http://www.foundation-stage.info/forums/in...orers&st=15

Have to say I never did buy any chewy sticks and the child I had concerns about (wiping nose in playdo -yeeeuuucccckkkkk!) has stopped!

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thank you so much, those look like a fantastic idea. i will be suggesting we try them ASAP, as he has now developed a taste for blutack and my displays have started to come away from the wall. Thankyou once again, I will let you know how they work out.

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I wrote him a very simple social story with photographs, to visually explain that we use the mouth for speaking etc, eating food and drinking. (we had to physically do a sorting exercise to work out what was food and drink and what wasn't!)

Have you been specially trained to write social stories, moo? If so, where and how did you access the training?

 

Maz

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Have to say I never did buy any chewy sticks and the child I had concerns about (wiping nose in playdo -yeeeuuucccckkkkk!) has stopped!

Reminds me of a child years ago who took great delight in pressing his face into a large piece of playdough to reveal a lovely full-face imprint - complete with the glistening impression left by his very snotty nose!

 

Needless to say the face cast was put carefully to one side for mum to take home :o

 

Maz

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Reminds me of a child years ago who took great delight in pressing his face into a large piece of playdough to reveal a lovely full-face imprint - complete with the glistening impression left by his very snotty nose!

 

Needless to say the face cast was put carefully to one side for mum to take home :o

 

Maz

 

 

 

Oh please! I'm eating my breakfast! xD

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Have you been specially trained to write social stories, moo? If so, where and how did you access the training?

 

Maz

 

Hi Maz

 

No I'm not specially trained but i have worked (previously) in a mainstream school that educates children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders ( max of 4 per year group)

 

As a result I've worked with loads of ASD children and have been on a few courses. The course about social sories was part of an ASD network support group and it was delivered by a Senior Educational Psychologist. It was really useful.

 

That was in Scotland, don't know what's available here (South of the border!!!)

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  • 2 weeks later...
We have a 3 year old that comes come a very disturbed home. He has 2 other siblings aged 4 & 5.

He is very angry goes round knocking down chairs when he gets tired. towards the end of the session. That's not too much of a problem because he responds to a cuddle. Absolutely everything goes in his mouth. Whilst I don't want to encourage this how do i meet his needs. Does he just have to work through the oral stage. When we see children putting play food, toys or dough in their mouths we tell them not to do it and explain why then get them to wash/wipe the toy themselves or throw the soggy dough in the bin.

 

 

I have a 4 yr old boy in my group who also puts everything into his mouth. Our speech therapist has already indicated a delay in his development and when i flagged this as one of my concerns and perhaps a further indication of delayed development she agreed but said his chewing is actually very good for the muscle development needed for his speech! With this in mind the Chewy Tubes maybe just the trick. :o

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We have a 3 year old that comes come a very disturbed home. He has 2 other siblings aged 4 & 5.

He is very angry goes round knocking down chairs when he gets tired. towards the end of the session. That's not too much of a problem because he responds to a cuddle. Absolutely everything goes in his mouth. Whilst I don't want to encourage this how do i meet his needs. Does he just have to work through the oral stage. When we see children putting play food, toys or dough in their mouths we tell them not to do it and explain why then get them to wash/wipe the toy themselves or throw the soggy dough in the bin.

 

As a specialist teacher of pre-schoolers with SEN i'm a bit concerned at some of the replies saying he has to be treated same as everyone else - not really inclusive. you sound like you know that it's not 'normal' for a child his age to do this and he isn't doing it just to irritate you. behaviour is just a form of communication - i think he's seeking something like comfort or stimulation and needs you to do exactly what you're doing and work out what he's asking for. if its comfort more attention and distractions will eventually be effective. if its stimulation he may have mild learning difficulties and be at a slightly lower stage of development than his chronological age - does he seem a little behind in any other areas of development? or as the 'sensory seeker' (lovely term) suggests it may be a sensory integration difficulty - you can refer to an occupational therapist for clarification but basically he's doing the right thing and seeking out what his brain needs which is extra stimulation so you just need to help him to find less bacteria-ridden and more socially acceptable ways of gaining oral stimulation (and no not a dummy as this tends to not be removed and will impede speech development)

hope this helpful and well done for being so sensitive and caring about it. niffa.

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In our nursery we also have a child who sucks everything and dribbles saliva all over objects, he also slurps the water from the water tray. He is SEN and has delayed development, he can't point to parts of body yet or follow instructions and I too would be grateful for tips to stop the sucking of toys.

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