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Lead Practitioner


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Today I got a phone call at school from the head of the Early Years Team in our LA. She was calling to discuss the prospect of me joining the Early Years Team as a lead practitioner. This was a complete surprise as I only finished my NQT year at Christmas however I have been promoted to FS coord in my school and we have recenlty had a good ofsted. Still a major surprise - i wasn't aware that she even knew who I was but apparently the moderators I had this year had gone back with fantastic reports to her and she even asked if she could use my moderation file for some training she's doing this term as it is the best one they've seen! Anyway (sorry to go on it's just so nice to hear something so positive as I have put my heart and soul into teaching FS - I am KS2 trained), I wondered what the role of lead practitioner would actually entail - I'm sure it's different in every LA however I would just like a rough idea.

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I can't actually answer your question but just wanted to congratulate you on being "head hunted"! I'm sure you deserve all the praise being heaped on you - I've just been looking at all your tuff spot ideas, you obviously have a lot of passion and enthusiasm for Early Years. The job does sound very interesting...do you think you'll be tempted?

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That's FAB news for you - you should be proud :o

 

I believe it is where you advise others and others come into observe you - but as you say, I am sure it is different in every LEA.

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Congratulation Mookie. You must be doing a GREAT job if you've been head hunted. In my authority (I think) the lead practitioners work as part of the Early Years team. One I know of is a FS teacher, and ,I think, works three days a week in her school and spends the other two days working for the authority early years team, visiting other settings, and also has lots of other teachers visiting her setting to observe good practice. She is also one of the FSP moderators, with all that that entails. Good luck if you decide to persue it.

 

Harricroft

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Congratulations Mookie!

I think the role is much as Harricroft describes.

Does that mean you have decided to stay in FS, I thought you were contemplating a move to an alternative age group?

Can you post some examples or tell us what you do exactly for your moderation file as Im sure that would help lots of us?

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Susan - I was thinking about a move as 2 jobs came up very near my home (I currently travel 1.5 hrs each day) and since the intro of EYPS I have been concerned about the possible lack of job security in FS for teachers in the years to come. After lots of thought I have decided to stay where I am for the time being as I absolutely love it at my school and have been offered lots of extra responsibilities very early on in my career.

I am having a meeting with the head of early years next week - do you think this will be similar to a job interview as I have never actually met her before and feel that she may want to suss me out. Am already taking my assessment file (not moderation file sorry - as she has requested this for her courses) but wondered whether to take a portfolio of planning, pics of learning bays, etc. What do you think? Any ideas as to anything you would take with you in a portfolio would be greatly appreciated.

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Mookie, what you have suggested taking with you sounds fine - lots of examples of your practice and provision that can act as prompts for you to discuss what you do. And don't forget to take some pics of your wonderful tuff spots - they're just fab! :o

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I agree with Wolfie as to what to take. Also, having thought more about the role of lead practitioner in my authority, I think the part time teacher/part time visitor might actually be called an Advisory Teacher, and the lead practitioner is someone who gets other practitioners visiting their setting to observe good practice. I'm sure it will all be explained to you at your meeting.

 

Good luck again.

Harricroft

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Congratulations Mookie!

 

I would be very interested in seeing/hearing about how you set up your fantastic files. Could you tell us more about it or email any of the contents?

 

puzzlesbuzzles@yahoo.co.uk

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Sorry to interrupt the thread but could I please remind people not to post their email addresses on the main forum, unless you want to end up with a mass of spam in your email inbox. :o If you would like someone to send you something, then you would be better to use the private messaging facility on the forum with your request. xD

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Hi just pm'd you Carol. I use the address above specifically for the purpose of public forums such as this. I would suggest others do the same and then it doesn't matter if you get spam - it all goes into the spam part of yahoo anyway so not a problem. I would never give out my personal or work email on a public forum x

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  • 3 weeks later...

leading teachers are all the thing at the moment, it would involve 3 days a term, either others coming to observe your good practise or you visiting and giving support and advice to others. funding for supply cover for your school when you visit and transport costs for you.

 

I think the leading teachers are instead of the old specilist teachers (cant think of term at moment but they got 35,000) and of course as a leading teacher you dont actually get any money. Good for your CV though.

 

If you search your LA site it will have links, the application forms normally ask for 2 A4 of why you think you would be good, then your head has to observe you and a member of EY will visit

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