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Nappy Changing And Emotional Needs


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am interested in others views on childrens emotional needs during nappy changing. is this part of the day ever really thought about or is it seen as a 'job to be done?'

if a child protests is the nappy changed anyway or do you employ another type of strategy? and how do you approach the child to be changed? is it down to one person during the session or the keyperson?

am interested in children who are aged between 2 and a half to four years. researching into this as part of my Ba at Roehampton University so would welcome all your thoughts on this. thanks.

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My personal opinion is that it is much a social time as any other part of the day. The children do not differentiate between 'learning' time and 'routine' time, so why should the adults?

 

As a former nursery nurse, I can understand how it becomes 'just a job that needs doing' as with a room full of toddlers it is a never ending stream of dirty nappies...

 

We used to do it on a rota basis so there would be one person on morning duty, one on lunchtime and one on afternoon, then anyone in between. Now I wouldn't even advocate this to any of the settings I support - I strongly believe that it is a key person role as each child likes having their nappy changed in a different way - some prefer the 'in and out' approach, whilst others like to be tickled, sung to and generally made a fuss of. Only the key person can truly know what each child likes after building up a relationship with the parents and that child.

 

A child shouldn't really protest if the key person is sensitive to the needs of the child, makes the experience into a fun and social time, allows them to take their favourite toy with them, knows that they are going to be returned to the playroom as quickly as possible and that it is in their best interests (and those of the staff :o ) to get their nappy changed.

 

Every child has a right to dignity and deserves not to have a grumpy nursery nurse going 'poo stinky' at them (unless this is part of a game) and pulling horrible faces - imagine that you are in a similar situation in years to come and you are reliant on someone changing you - what goes around comes around in my opinion...

 

 

Sorry, ranted a bit there, but I get a bit passionate about this one!

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You rant away RB :o I hate it when a nursery nurse pulls faces at the smell and makes comments, unless as you say it's part of a known game with the child.

I do sometimes think that in some places the routine of the nappy change is more important than the stuff that goes on in between times. In a room with just 8 toddlers surely it would be better practice to change the children as they needed it rather than by clock watching and using a conveyor belt approach.

I agree it should be done by someone who knows the child too. As supply I have told staff child x's nappy was loose to be told 'it always is'. If it was always the keyperson, there would be better feedback to parents too.

Where I am now the staff agree amongst themselves who will do the changes and dont use the keyworker necessarily but as they have only a small number of children in nappies in the baby and toddler rooms it works ok.

If a child protests it's usually down to the fact they dont want to leave an activity. They just need to be reassured the game will still be there for them, or let them take a toy with them. Its such an individual thing that it can be difficult to use a 'one size fits all' approach, it really is about knowing your children and their needs.

Good luck with your BA. :D

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What to do when a child protests has been a recent source of discussion in our own setting - school nursery for 3-4 year olds. We try to ensure the routine is carried out by a child's keyworker where ever possible but have had 2 children who have caused us concern by their refusal to be changed. The difficulty being whilst we would never change a child who absolutely didn't want to be changed we also wouldn't want to leave them wet or in a mess. A variety of strategies has been tried with each - mainly consisting of time and talk until the child is happier with the situation - also lots of liaison with parents.

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I work in a day nursery where children are changed by their key worker for the reasons mentioned in other posts - have built up a relationship of trust, are familiar with, key worker knows preferred routine of child. i have only experienced children not wanting to have nappy changed because they are engrossed in an activity - I explain that "they will get a sore bottom" if they don't have their nappy changed and also allow them to bring something they are playing with to leave just outside the bathroom with Teddy "who will look after it for them". You could also try giving the child a reminder that their nappy will need changing soon - so they can prepare themselves - perhaps setting an egg timer. Also making the experience an enjoyable one - let the child choose a song to be sung, have interesting posters next to the changing mat (that are changed regularly) and mobiles hanging above the changing area - again changed ocassionally.

 

Good luck.

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Some really nice answers there. I would like to add that some of the children who dont talk alot through session are quite chatting when they are being changed. Not sure why?

We try not to use the child's key person to change in case they are off for any reason.

Wouldn't force a child to be changed but that must be very hard in a day nursery where you can not just call the parents.

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