Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Questions Re Planning


 Share

Recommended Posts

we have 1 focus actiivty a week based on significant things we have observed the children doing the previous week.

 

Can you help with the following;

 

Do you plan specific adult activities covering target stepping stones/elg?

Do you have a toy rota to ensure varied resources are got out, we are finding the children are playing with the same things over and over again?

We used to get things such as flashcards, beebot etc out in keyworker time, but we dont do keyworker time anymore?

What about covering things such as Jolly phonics, letter and number work?

 

We target 4 children a session for observations if you do this how do you know what to observe and does one member of staff observe and the others play?

 

We are finding it very hard and we arent doing it at the moment toplan for the individual child, can someone explain how they do this please.

 

A lot of questions I know I just cant settle or sleep at the mo!!!!

 

Thanks all!

 

Sharon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The keyworker system is great for small group obs linked to a focus, so it's a shame you dont do it.

As for choosing 4 children a day. I would write everything I saw and heard and then relate it to the s/s in some way. It wouldnt need to be word for word, but if you saw a child using the dressing up and then skipping over to play with a friend and using a carrot as a phone, you could link it to 'dress/undress independently -PSE, move in a variety of ways - PD, and uses objects to represent other things ?? - Havent got my folder handy but you know what I mean.

 

I never touched phonic work as I didnt believe it was my place to teach such stuff while not being a teacher, but I did do lots of ryhmes, singing, stories, poems, games such as 'eye spy', and I saw one at the education show 'hear spy' or something, same principle but sounds. Letters can be done in the paint, sand, dough cornflour, but I mostly did marks, again its not being a teacher, I didnt want to show them the wrong way that a teacher would have to undo.

Number work can be done with lots of things, building bricks, train, cars...I've just bought some big money and food with prices on, it was a great hit and told me loads about the children. I know A isnt so hot as people beieve, she's very good at conversation and has excellent manners but doesnt recognise any numerals I showed her. L is good at listening and thinking but has a very limited concentration span, and J just ate the food. Next time I'm with them I have a basis to go on while I'm playing even if it isnt at a focused activity.

 

Hope you dont loose too much sleep over it, it's not worth that :o:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there, what sort of setting are you in?

 

You really should try to include keyperson time, as this gives you an opportunity to work in a small group where you are aware of each child's level.

 

We don't work to stepping stones or goals as such - we plan for Aspects, with the emphasis on the skills needed to be able to reach the elgs.

 

We don't have a toy rota - the children have as free a choice from available resources as space allows for display. If you can't display/make available, try gathering photos for children to choose from as you begin to fill out your planning - block it in as 'Children's Choice' if there's pressure! or just put up a blank sheet and fill it in as children choose!

 

Don't worry about phonics etc unless you're in a school-based provision, when you should have expert advice at hand. Like Rea says, it's rotten to give children something they then need to 'un-learn'. She also says ' if you are targeting your observations, they should all be together in whatever form suits you' (well, more or less says!) - and your last query, individual children - with targeted obs and Keyperson time, it just falls together!

 

If you want to talk further, and I'm more than happy to, pm, email or keep posting here!

 

Sue :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rea and Sue

 

Sue that would be great to have your support by email as I feel I have so many questions and dont want to bore everyone to death! Not sure how to do this still finding my way round the forum etc !

 

 

As for your comments

Sue what planning format do you use, we are being told not to plan in advance and just have a weekly sheet - its blank and under each workshop area we are supposed to write something significaint that the children did and then plan (the only bit we do plan for ) a focus for the following week from what you wrote down, but we are finding this very hard as the children tend to play with the same things and are happy doing so - nothing really significiant seems to be happening. Also we dont have record of what the children did play with, or dont you think we need this?

 

As for keyworker groups how do you do this we are a day nursery with two rooms (Max 20 downstairs) which at the moment are split into 2-3 and 3-5 we need to get on top of the planning!!! before we open them up so all the children are together-for complete free flow like we are being asked to do by our yet another stand in mentor! We were told we mustnt take the children away to do keyworker time as we are interupting their play!

 

If you could help with a suggested way of planning I think this would help me sooooo.. much. i really am on the verge of packing it all up I really cant deal with the stress of this each day and the staff are getting so demotivated again, we have been trying so hard for the past 10 months now, with no support from our EYDCP new stand in mentors keeping coming in and things keep changing. We dont have any settings locally that are entertaining this new way of planning , free flow etc as they are against it I really want to do this but am struggling!

 

I would really value your support and advice thanks x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Wolfie

Hi - just to say that I am in the process of helping a nursery implement a keyworker system - once I've organised the content of the staff training session I'm organsising I'll gladly share my plans with you! In the meantime, I've found a book by Peter Elfer about the keyperson approach very useful and "readable" - you'll find it on Amazon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sue what planning format do you use, we are being told not to plan in advance and just have a weekly sheet - its blank and under each workshop area we are supposed to write something significaint that the children did and then plan (the only bit we do plan for ) a focus for the following week from what you wrote down, but we are finding this very hard as the children tend to play with the same things and are happy doing so - nothing really significiant seems to be happening. Also we dont have record of what the children did play with, or dont you think we need this?

 

The usual format for a workshop approach is to do long term plans based on the continuous provision you have available. The planning sheets are displayed alongside each area and used as a prompt sheet for staff.

 

Try here for some planning sheets...

 

As far as noting down what the children are doing for the next week - you really need to know the children, which is why keyworker time is so important. It may look like nothing significant is happening, but children are testing theories and trying out new ideas all the time.

 

You don't necessarily have to use these 'findings' as a focus i.e. a staff member is present, you could just enhance the existing provision by responding to the children's interests. For example if a child is seen constantly pouring from one container to another in the water tray, introduce different containers, ones with holes in, measuring jugs etc. A member of staff (keyworker perhaps) could then support that child by developing their language (more, less etc) and introduce new theories for the children to start to explore 'what would happen if...?'

 

Don't worry about the children playing with the same thing all the time - they would soon stop if they got bored!! As long as you are able to 'scaffold' their learning and keep them stimulated and motivated, you're doing the right thing! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One word of caution with the free flow between 2-3 and 3-5 years olds. Some toys are not suitable for some of the 2 year olds from a safety point of view. However you absolutely should have them available for the 3, 4 and 5 year olds, as they will be developmentally appropriate for some of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)