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I've just come back from a training course on Early Reading in line with the Rose report findings. We've spent the day being trained on the new expectations of phonic delivery. Well, we've been given a whole load of paperwork highlighting the expected teaching across years reception and year one. Very heavy, fast and challenging - especially as my class are second language learners themselves.

 

I was wondering whether anyone had actually done any planning related to this faster approach to phonics and was willing to share it? I'd appreciate some sort of guidance as to how and when you approach some of the aspects related to the new phases please!

 

Your help would be muchy appreciated!

 

A very tired reception teacher!

 

D xxx

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Our school was in the pilot and found that the faster pace went very well. Children with EAL and SEN coped well. At the end of the year the weakest child (who is going to be statemented for MLD) knew 20 sounds and the top group were attempting to write words like crocodile. The training was good and really seemed to work in practice. Our reception teacher was given quite a bit of support. Will you have that too?

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Found this link on google - it looks like the course you did?

 

http://literacy.cumbriagridforlearning.org...?category_id=61

Things to down load that may be useful.

Kat has also posted a brilliant timetable for phonics which you can down load as well as breakdowns for each term - not sure whether they follow the guidance you got on your course. I have put the document as an attachment as I don't know how to link to the original post she put on the forum. Hopefully some one techy minded will do that for me (Steve?)

 

Foundation_Stage_Medium_Term_Pacer_Phonics_2006_2b.doc :o

 

Just realised this is the termly plan which is good but you will need to find the other 2 terms on the original post. I also have another document which I got from here somewhere which I will post when I find it.

 

FOUND IT! Sorry i can't remember who did this so I can't give them the credit for all their hard work.

Phonics_Long_Medium_term_planning.doc Thank you who ever it was!

 

 

 

 

 

Sue

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Hi all

I am taking part in the Early Phonics Development Project locally- linked to CLLD. I am trying to develop a book band 0 - Lilac, linked to the lilac Collins Big Cat level books. I read some people rate Rigby star. Is any one else using scheme books at this emergent level they would recommend? I have puffin/walker books to use with no/litle text. Thanks

LGM

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I'm slightly confused (no change there then! :o )

 

I attended a CLLD project meeting/course, yesterday p.m. and just did a quick search on here to find out what the general thinking is - and found this!

 

The problem I have is that what has been proposed is basically teaching phonics the way I was trained to teach them 3 years back. Now I've only recently started a short contract in a YR class in Wiltshire, having always previously worked in Bath & North East Somerset; at my current school, YR children are only taught the alphabet phonemes, plus 'ch', 'sh' and 'th'. I'm wondering whether there are variations across the LEAs regarding how phonics are taught. Is it that my GTP school, where I trained, was just ahead of the game? The teacher I trained under is now a leading EY teacher and has been for some 18 months, so I don't think they were doing anything wrong using this approach. Certainly since I took over this class I've been pushing phonics far more, as I assumed the class teacher (currently on maternity leave) hadn't been pushing them enough.

 

What worried me even more was the number of people on the course who didn't seem able to explain what a phonemes/digraphs etc. actually were and also the number of people giving incorrect answers to 'how many phonemes are in the word .... ?' an example being 'string'.

 

Luckily my Head hasn't been around much today, but I just know when I see him he's going to ask how it went and what I thought; I don't want to sound completely pompous or anything, but I personally didn't feel I'd learnt much more after attending the meeting. That's not to say I learnt nothing, and I certainly think it's useful to get together with other practitioners and have the support of leading teachers etc. and resources which will be available to us. But I'm struggling to see what all the fuss is about.

 

What does everyone else think? Has anyone else been on the course and thought they were already doing what was being proposed? Or are there other people maybe who haven't had any dealings with it, and who are merrily teaching 42/44 phonemes to YR?

 

Sorry if this sounds negative or makes me sound 'up myself', but I just don't get it.

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Hi Chocolate girl

I follow the Jolly Phonics programme (and have done so for the past 8 years) and so cover all the alphabet plus a large number of digraphs (haven't counted how many, but I'm sure someone else will tell you!). Those schools that teach the alphabet plus sh, th and ch are presumably following the (old) literacy strategy?

Keep doing it your way! :D

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Jolly Phonics initially covers 42 sounds then introduces the alternative ways of writing long vowel sounds so is in line with the new phonics. It doesn't introduce c as in ceiling and now my mind has gone totally blank about which other sound is not covered.

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Hi all!!

Went on the course too and felt that at the moment they were asking us to make sure we were teaching the 42 phonemes at a fast pase using the Pips and playing with sounds documents. I personally follow the Jolly Phonics sequence completing 3 phonemes a week. I put this document together; trying to show my new headteacher (who is a w****r, and has no idea about foundation stage) showing that the JP progression still follows the 'Phases'. Anyway, hope it helps!!!! :o

sound_word_order.doc

Phonic_Progress_class_recodt__2006_7.doc

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Thanks Bailey, that looks really useful.

 

We have phonics training/ inset when we go back next week so wonder what that will be exactly. Although my school follows JP, the speed is not there. I have been trying to move my January reception along at a reasonable rate and am hoping that when they are full time next half term we can move even faster!

 

Chocolate Girl, Im sure the answer to your query is that your school was following the previous NLS guidelines as the synthetic phonics programmes were largely unrecognised.

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I'm slightly confused (no change there then! :o )

 

I attended a CLLD project meeting/course, yesterday p.m. and just did a quick search on here to find out what the general thinking is - and found this!

 

The problem I have is that what has been proposed is basically teaching phonics the way I was trained to teach them 3 years back. Now I've only recently started a short contract in a YR class in Wiltshire, having always previously worked in Bath & North East Somerset; at my current school, YR children are only taught the alphabet phonemes, plus 'ch', 'sh' and 'th'. I'm wondering whether there are variations across the LEAs regarding how phonics are taught. Is it that my GTP school, where I trained, was just ahead of the game? The teacher I trained under is now a leading EY teacher and has been for some 18 months, so I don't think they were doing anything wrong using this approach. Certainly since I took over this class I've been pushing phonics far more, as I assumed the class teacher (currently on maternity leave) hadn't been pushing them enough.

 

What worried me even more was the number of people on the course who didn't seem able to explain what a phonemes/digraphs etc. actually were and also the number of people giving incorrect answers to 'how many phonemes are in the word .... ?' an example being 'string'.

 

Luckily my Head hasn't been around much today, but I just know when I see him he's going to ask how it went and what I thought; I don't want to sound completely pompous or anything, but I personally didn't feel I'd learnt much more after attending the meeting. That's not to say I learnt nothing, and I certainly think it's useful to get together with other practitioners and have the support of leading teachers etc. and resources which will be available to us. But I'm struggling to see what all the fuss is about.

 

What does everyone else think? Has anyone else been on the course and thought they were already doing what was being proposed? Or are there other people maybe who haven't had any dealings with it, and who are merrily teaching 42/44 phonemes to YR?

 

Sorry if this sounds negative or makes me sound 'up myself', but I just don't get it.

 

 

I think something that people forget is that neither the literacy or numeracy strategy are compulsory and need not be followed if schools wish to use their own approach (and can justify it with OFSTED I suppose xD )

We use PiPs and JP and teach a sound a day which we find most of the children manage quite well. At the end of the day its what works for your children and fits in with your school.

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one of the key findings from all the recent developments/Rose is that the subject knowledge around the early teaching of reading is not secure and why the LAs are providing a lot of early reading development training across the country. Depending on when you trained you may or may not have any real understanding of the core skills requred or how to systematically develop them.

 

As an update, despite the statements that phonics programmes would be "kitemarked" for their compatability with Rose's recommendations this has now been amended due to the sheer volume of phonics schemes now coming out of the woodwork for accreditation! Thus all schemes will self evaluate and will need to demonstrate themselves how they comply and provide this info which will presumably give settings the info they need to make an informed choice.

 

In relation to the progression and pace, although it may seem that this is similar to how it was done before there is a core difference in the specific and required teaching of blending and segmenting skills from the earliest point. There is also a very big focus on the application of these skills which also then requires more careful planning of the choice of shared reading texts, shared writing foci, guided group texts and wider opps within the curriculum to use the developing knowledge. This is something that my F2 teachers have commented on - how they are more focused on the actual written text rather than the "content" of the story and what theme it may link to when they choose a "big book" for example.

 

Coupled with this the "Review, teach, practise, apply" teaching sequence for the delivery of the daily session is very powerful - I have recently seen a class of brand new January intake kids really getting the hang of cvc words and starting to write them independently because of the way their teacher has taken on this systematic thread of teaching. In the old days we were not so systematic with blending/segmenting i think and this is where it fell down. We taught sounds but not how to actually use them to decode/spell until much later. Whatever scheme teachers have used, be it JP, PWS or any other this overlaying structuring of the taught session is very effective.

 

Having now supported the introduction of ERDP/CLLD developments in a range of schools and seen the impact on the learning of children that it has made I am completely in favour of it and think it really makes a difference. The Rose report recommendations will be an integral part of the revised framework I am certain and in that respect may well aquire a statutory element by being in the document. We await Easter and the next advised date for publication!

 

Cx

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Hi i teach reception and we have begun teaching phonics outside the literacy hour now in light of the rose report. I teach it for approx 15-20mins depending upon the children every day after last play and the children seem to enjoy it this way. I have attached an example of my weekly phonics plan. I can attach my literacy one if any one is interested, we were given a format by the literacy support team (not sure how foundation stage friendly it is!)

 

Love Kat xxx

 

Can I also just thank whoever posted their key word flower power power point (mentioned in my plans) as I have been using it and the kids, parents and head think its fab!! Don't worry I didn't take credit for it! Cant remember who it was but thank you!

Phonics_Plan___29.01.07.doc

Edited by Kat
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Hi i teach reception and we have begun teaching phonics outside the literacy hour now in light of the rose report. I teach it for approx 15-20mins depending upon the children every day after last play and the children seem to enjoy it this way. I have attached an example of my weekly phonics plan. I can attach my literacy one if any one is interested, we were given a format by the literacy support team (not sure how foundation stage friendly it is!)

 

Love Kat xxx

 

Can I also just thank whoever posted their key word flower power power point (mentioned in my plans) as I have been using it and the kids, parents and head think its fab!! Don't worry I didn't take credit for it! Cant remember who it was but thank you!

 

 

Hi Kat just wanted to ask if you do a literacy hour with your reception class

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I only have a small class and in light of statisfactory ofsted and extra literacy support I do plan seperately for literacy. I wouldn't say that it was as formal as the literacy hour, we do a whole class input then the children go off and free choose and we will do either a guided read, guided write or phonics game. This is more flexible though as our small group activities or individual activities can go over a day or two we would never get round everyone in an hour! We also don't just have literacy activities out for free choice we make sure that it is balanced. so really I am just planning a whole class literacy input and adult led activities so it is not a formal literacy hour?

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I only have a small class and in light of statisfactory ofsted and extra literacy support I do plan seperately for literacy. I wouldn't say that it was as formal as the literacy hour, we do a whole class input then the children go off and free choose and we will do either a guided read, guided write or phonics game. This is more flexible though as our small group activities or individual activities can go over a day or two we would never get round everyone in an hour! We also don't just have literacy activities out for free choice we make sure that it is balanced. so really I am just planning a whole class literacy input and adult led activities so it is not a formal literacy hour?

 

 

Thanks Kat I'm always interested in how other people do things and I'm even more nosey as part of my studies is looking at how the curriculum is delivered :D

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The planning above looks great, can I just say that I also encourage the children to 'apply' the skills that I have taught tha day. We 'apply' every lesson. So a typical session would be

Review

Teach

Practise

Apply

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Found this link on google - it looks like the course you did?

 

http://literacy.cumbriagridforlearning.org...?category_id=61

Things to down load that may be useful.

 

Sue

 

 

I found it very interesting and pleasing that the teachers books used on the course aren't the expected synthetic phonic schemes. I would be interested in hearing the views of anyone who attended the course

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  • 1 month later...

There are quite a few programmes out there now. Perhaps people who have looked at or are using other programmes could share their thoughs as so far I've only seen discussion of Jolly Phonics. We used to use Jolly Phonics but started using an early version of Ruth Miskin's phonic programme when she was still a head in Tower Hamlets.That's about 8 years ago.

Last year several of us attended training with her & are now using her 'Read Write Inc.' programme.

 

We do do 5 sounds a week & segmenting and blending happpens from first few letters in. The whole package with all the resources is expensive & so is the training.

However I think it has been a good buy with children making good progress in reading & writing in a Reception Class.

 

All the children love the programme & the whiteboard resource is great

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I went on our LEA's training "teaching reading post Rose review" last week. It was in two parts

(a month apart) over two mornings and at quite a fast pace. Like someone previously mentioned there were quite a few practitioners who were struggling with the concept of diagraphs etc.

 

Anyway on the first day we were told "playing with sounds" was going to be updated, no new hardcopy and all available online and that any other phonics programmes would have to meet DFES criteria which they haven't yet published. Last week they told us hot off the press that the government had changed there minds and were writing a complete phonics programme, with dvd, guidance, training and correct announciation, this would fit in with their criteria (obviously!!!) and five copies would be sent free to all schools. Expected April, May time. Because the print run would be so huge we may recieve one copy to begin with the others to follow.

 

Later copies would be distributed to pre schools.

 

Sharon

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  • 6 months later...
I'm slightly confused (no change there then! :o )

 

I attended a CLLD project meeting/course, yesterday p.m. and just did a quick search on here to find out what the general thinking is - and found this!

 

The problem I have is that what has been proposed is basically teaching phonics the way I was trained to teach them 3 years back. Now I've only recently started a short contract in a YR class in Wiltshire, having always previously worked in Bath & North East Somerset; at my current school, YR children are only taught the alphabet phonemes, plus 'ch', 'sh' and 'th'. I'm wondering whether there are variations across the LEAs regarding how phonics are taught. Is it that my GTP school, where I trained, was just ahead of the game? The teacher I trained under is now a leading EY teacher and has been for some 18 months, so I don't think they were doing anything wrong using this approach. Certainly since I took over this class I've been pushing phonics far more, as I assumed the class teacher (currently on maternity leave) hadn't been pushing them enough.

 

What worried me even more was the number of people on the course who didn't seem able to explain what a phonemes/digraphs etc. actually were and also the number of people giving incorrect answers to 'how many phonemes are in the word .... ?' an example being 'string'.

 

Luckily my Head hasn't been around much today, but I just know when I see him he's going to ask how it went and what I thought; I don't want to sound completely pompous or anything, but I personally didn't feel I'd learnt much more after attending the meeting. That's not to say I learnt nothing, and I certainly think it's useful to get together with other practitioners and have the support of leading teachers etc. and resources which will be available to us. But I'm struggling to see what all the fuss is about.

 

What does everyone else think? Has anyone else been on the course and thought they were already doing what was being proposed? Or are there other people maybe who haven't had any dealings with it, and who are merrily teaching 42/44 phonemes to YR?

 

Sorry if this sounds negative or makes me sound 'up myself', but I just don't get it.

 

 

Hi Chocolate Girl,

I work in BANES and our school is taking part in the CLLD project. We are really excited by the project and the results are impressive. I aggree with you that for several years those of us who have been using JP have introduced the phonemes in a pacy manner. However, the Rose Review does highlight the need to raise expectations in terms of early reading skills. One of which is segmenting and blending from the start and supporting children's speaking and listening skills.

 

The Letters and Sounds document is packed with new and old games etc to introduce phonemes, support speaking and listening and segmenting and blending. The advisers are saying that JP still has a place as long as you follow it by the book and that the letters and sounds document supports alongside. Phase 1 is especially successful in EY and for settings affiliated with your school (getting them on board is especially successful). The phases have also provided myself and year1/2 teachers with a method for assessing where the children are at, this being useful for transition. I also think that planning purely phonics lessons (approx 20mins) everyday outside of your literacy lesson will also impact on standards. I have been creative with this as well, planning lessons within P.E and outside.

It sounds like you have lots of experience and good practice so it should be easy for you to embed this approach within your setting. Good luck

Best wishes

Munch

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  • 4 months later...
Hi all!!

Went on the course too and felt that at the moment they were asking us to make sure we were teaching the 42 phonemes at a fast pase using the Pips and playing with sounds documents. I personally follow the Jolly Phonics sequence completing 3 phonemes a week. I put this document together; trying to show my new headteacher (who is a w****r, and has no idea about foundation stage) showing that the JP progression still follows the 'Phases'. Anyway, hope it helps!!!! xD

 

Hi Bailey,

 

Wow! I've been googling looking for phonics info for over an hour now and your posting has just summed it up nicely. Thanks very much - hope you get this - new member and first reply. :o

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