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Physical Restraint Policy


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Presently my setting (2-4 year olds) uses 'time out' as a way to address unwanted behaviour.

It is usually used after '3 reminders of unacceptable behaviour' are given, although i have observed some staff only giving one 'reminder' then telling the child to sit away from an activity for minor incidents such as not tidying away when asked to.

I am becoming concerned in a couple of ways about the implementation of this

 

a) that it is starting to be used too frequently for minor things for which other techniques could be used such as 'ignoring (removing attention), distraction techniques, praising a positive point about the child conerned/another child displaying desired behaviour etc.

and,

:o if a child does not voluntarily 'remove themselves' from the activity/situation when asked to, a member of staff will pick them up gently and put them down away from the activity/situation.

 

Am i right in believing that 'unless a child is in danger of hurting themselves, someone else or property', then we should not physically pick them up against their will? Does this not infringe on the rights of a child, as we are imposing our wishes physically on the child?

 

Just read all the above back and i'm aware it's not very well worded - but I'm sure you get the jist!

 

i would love to hear other settings behaviour strategies, especially with regards to 'time out' and the 'physical removal' of a child from a situation.

 

Thanks

 

Oooops, I didn't mean to put that face in!..... i thought I was putting xD

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We are having behaviour management training as a whole team at the beginning of April. This is going to inform our new policy.

 

I know it's a while to wait but I'll post up my notes from it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

We have added to our Behaviour Management Policy to explain that if a child refuses to move away from an activity when the whole group needs to leave the room or area, we may take them gently by the hand and guide them away. We never leave one member of staff alone with the children, and to allow staff to remain with one child has implications for the ratio of the large group of children.

 

If the child becomes upset or agitated, an incident report is made in a book for the parent to sign after the situation has been explained to them. We would hope to work together with the parent/carer to help the child understand the implications of their behaviour.

 

This, of course, after all other strategies have been tried and tested!

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We had behaviour management training via our Area Senco - It was frustrating to say the least. basically she said that unless the child was in danger, we do not use any physical restraint. Full stop!!! Even explaining varios senarios such as a child refusing to come in from outside play, refusing to share a ride on toy etc, she said we had to wait until the child was ready to come in/get off toy etc. Fair enough but often this can be a nightmare when parents are due to arrive or other children start copying the behaviour etc. The senco said, if one child was being distruptive, then take all the other children to another room/place until that child was 'ready'??? I said I though that terribly unfair on the other children and the fact that I would have to distrupt 24 other children for the sake of 1 child was ridiculous, but she gave me short shrift!!?

 

Jenni

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We have a child that is very disruptive in our sessions we do now remove him from the other children. To do this it was recommended by the behaviour speciaist that i had a signed agreement with the parent. This i now have put in place.

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Good advice simcity. :D

 

Makes you wonder though doesn't it, we are proffesional people ( who can't spell :( ) who 'care' for children. If when out on a walk a child veers dangerously near to the road and is taken by the hand and 'pulled' to safety, would we then be liable for an assault charge?? :( , I would hope not, in extreme cases, behaviour management requires restraint for safety of child, other children and staff.

 

I once had a child who would 'stab' at others, with pencil, scissors etc, or whilst walking past another child just pull the child to the floor and attempt to stamp on the victims head, I had to use restraint for their safety. I could have moved the 'victim' and left the attacker ( as JenniB's tutor suggests) but she would then attack another child. :o She was quite uncontrollable at times when she had an audience, but couldn't be left on her own "until she was ready", her first week at Primary she 'strangled' the class hamster (to death) xD

 

I have requested specific 'restraint' training but to no avail yet. :(

 

Peggy

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I'm beginning to think we are the ones under restraint: more and more lately I've been feeling like I'm working with at least one hand tied behind my back. :o

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Sam

We use the same methods as Di, the leading away from a situation by the hand and never leave a staff member alone. We also, if the situation allows, give positive attention to those children who are demonstrating appropriate behaviour, encouraging them away to something fun. If they may be in danger due to flying arms and legs we will move all the other away asap.

 

One thing we we advised, think it was at CAF training, was that anything to do with behaviour intervension recording, as well as marks on children, bumps they come into nursery with, etc should be on loose sheets and filed seperately. If there was to be an issue at a later date that needed child protection intervention, then the forms would need to be taken away, and a book with everone elses details in is not appropriate.

 

We have been trying to find out about the 'Time out' approach, as this is something we used to do sometime ago. But where do we stand when a parent is doing time out at home and asks for it to be carried out at nursery for continuity. This has been in the case of biting, where the child concerned just laughs at you, then goes over as soon as possible and wacks the child you gave the attension to around the head. This even happens when attention is given for appropriate behaviour. It's almost like a held grudge. Our support teacher has said that time out cannot be carried out even under parental wishes!!!!

 

Birth to Three Behaviour Management Training in a couple of weeks. Will pass on anything from that to you all. Hoping to start out 'Conflict Resolution' Training soon. Can't wait looks so interesting.

 

I feel like you weightman. It's all very confusing at times :o

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