Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Play Theorists


Clare
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi! I need some help (as always) for my latest module on the FD. We are now doing Play and the Early Years Curriculum which I have been quite looking forward too actually! I'm writing an observation at present to include in my assessment and I need to include theories of play in the evaluation. I know that Froebel, Montessori and Steiner are all play theorists, but I was hoping for something a little bit differrent so was wondering if anybody knew of any other theorists relating to play that I might be able to have a look at? I've done a quick Google and found a few hard to read pieces but can't seem to find what I am looking for, unless I'm just not reading it right.

 

Thanks! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Clare,

 

Nursery World have been running an interesting series on Early Years Pioneers, which may not be quite what you're after, but would make interesting reading for you, and could offer some new ideas for you to develop??

 

Sue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found this, scroll down to see what JEROME SINGER say's about play

 

here

 

and this all about the value of toys in play ( mentions other theorists)

 

here

 

I can only think of Susan Isaacs and Maria Montessori.

 

More modern theorists; Trisha David, and another female who's name escapes me :o

 

Good luck, happy reading :D

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tina Bruce was also one of the recommended theorists in this field when I studied at uni. I also vaguely remember a book by Angela Anning being good

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah Yes, Tina Bruce, that's the lady I was thinking of :D

 

Peggy

 

 

 

Underlying Principles of Childhood Education from Early Childhood Education by Tina Bruce (1987)

 

1. Childhood is seen as valid in itself, as part of life and not simply as preparation for adulthood. Thus education is seen similarly as something of the present and not just preparation and training for later.

2. The whole child is considered to be important. Health, physical and mental, is emphasised, as well as the importance of feelings and thinking and spiritual aspects.

3. Learning is not compartmentalised, for everything links.

4. Intrinsic motivation, resulting in child-initiated, self-directed activity, is valued.

5. Self-discipline is emphasised.

6. There are specially receptive periods of learning at different stages of development.

7. What children can do (rather than what they cannot do) is the starting point in the child's education.

8. There is an inner life in the child that emerges, especially under favourable conditions.

9. The people (both adults and children) with whom the child interacts are of central importance.

10. The child's education is seen as an interaction between the child and the environment the child is in, including, in particular, other people and knowledge itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Sorry, another question.

 

Who was the 'theorist' that talked about open-ended activities/resources? I am writing about sand and cornflour play and I have said that they are open-ended but I'm not sure who originally came up with the term and I need to back up what I am tryong to say.

 

Thanks in advance, you clever lot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)