Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Maths Area


 Share

Recommended Posts

hi everyone

the children in my nursery hardly ever use the maths area we have put lots of maths resources around the nursery. if we move say the maths table and put somthing else into the space will ofsted mark us down for not having a maths area. whatever way does anyone have any ideas for making this area more attractive for the children. we have tried posters,dangling things from the ceiling and have attractive displays.

Edited by wellerkaren
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it is a case of maths happens everywhere, as long as you can show Ofsted that you are covering the maths aspects in your planning and delivery and that children are progressing in maths, that is ok. It is not for Ofsted to say 'how' you should deliver the curriculum ie: that you must have a maths area.

 

If however, you like to work with a maths area as well as using opportunities other than in this area then may I suggest as many interactive activities as possible, presented using as many senses as possible. some activities which require adult support and others which can be solely accessed by the children.

 

Once I made 3 tubes out of A3 sized laminate, I attached the tubes to a board, in 3 vertical columns, next to each other, the children could then place balls ( like the ones you get in ball pools) into the tubes, hey presto an interactive bar chart. children could sort balls in colour ( red in one tube, yellow in another, blue in another, which tube column / colour has the most balls? which has the least? etc)

How many balls needed to fill the tube to the top etc, How many altogether if you fill 2 tubes, 3 tubes? different sized balls = more to a tube if smaller, less if bigger etc.

 

 

Our maths area has a draw unit to select various maths games, from board games, dice games, jigsaws, bead threading, mattern making games etc.

We have a ladybird number line - one dot on wing, two dots, three dots, etc, then underneath each ladybird is a velcro dot for children to match a ladybird which has the written number 1, 2, 3 etc on it ( velcro dot on reverse). we do 1-20 ladybirds.

 

Have fun.

 

Peggy

 

 

p.s. I normally find if an adult is in an area, the children are more likely to use it. :o

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ofsted will be fine as long as you bring it in to routine aswell as planned activities so they can see the children are having opportunities to use number.

Also a tip we use all the time but will impress ofsted remember to use maths language.

For instance when lining up or similiar 'we have 4 and 1 more makes 5'Or 'How many more do we need?'

I will never forget the inspectors face time before last when playing a peg game a child announced Ive won Ive got 10 and another piped up no you havent I have,ive got 11 and thats one more then you!!!I could of kissed him :D by the way the peg game is a big hit with the children!

Also beaware which child is where for instance jack can count to 10 and back but struggles to count 1:1 but Susie counts to 3 and understands the concept,Ofsted may ask you,who is your best counter?where is this recorded and what and where on your plans have you implemented that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a designated 'maths'area but as Peggy says there is maths going on in nearly all the areas in the unit. It might be capacity in the sand or water shape in the block play tally charts on clip boards in the garden positional language in role play pattern in the art area etc........... our maths table is used mainly for games usually initiated by an adult to get the children interested ( as Peggy says they are more likely to go there if an adult is sat in the area) We have storage boxes on shelves in the maths area which include things like number washing lines , threading beads, unifix cubes, shapes 2D & 3D, compare bears, counting camels, balance scales and things to weigh plastic numbers, magnetic shapes and numbers, russian dolls, for the children to access.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would agree that if you can show where opportunities for maths are provided you shouldn't need to have an actual maths area.

 

But how about using the space for a small role-play area with a clear maths focus - a shop springs to mind - doesn't need to be very elaborate but children always love shopping and it offers lots of opportunities for maths and variations... grocery shop one week, bakers the next...

 

Talking of bakers activities linked to favourite number rhymes are always very popular.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for all your replies

thanks peggy once again i will try your tube ball game next week and putting a member of staff in this area. do any other people have mixed age groups as this somtimes means we can not do pegs and mats as the little ones put them into there mouths

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try paper plates and big colourful washing pegs and a sandtimer or similiar.

they haveto see howmany pegs they can get on their plates in 3 min,or you could do colours.

excellent for counting sorting and pincer movement aswell as being FUN

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)