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Guest rhodessj
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Guest rhodessj

Hi. I am a part-time practitioner in a pre-school and working on my Level 3 NVQ (DPP). I have found some great books about observations & assessments and generally don't feel I have a problem with carrying them out. My problem lies in that I need to separately assess emotional development - most text/reference books lump PSE together and I am having difficulty in working out which of my target child's traits are specifically related to Emotional Development. I've identified her ability to concentrate & persevere, her high self-esteem and a self concept. She takes care of her own personal needs and accepts challenges. All great stuff (I hope), but I can't find anywhere to get a quote to back that sort of stuff up... I've had no problem with the other areas of development - am I barking up the wrong tree?

 

The child concerned is a 3year old and in all other areas of development appears a little advanced of the "average". Any help gratefully received... :o

 

Sandra

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HI Sandra,

I see you've only made 1 other post so I guess I've not welcomed you before, so welcome in!

 

I'm not sure I've got anything really helpful to add but my thoughts go to the Curriculum Guidance document (pink folder), have you looked at that, can your observations help you identify which stepping stones the child meets? You can identify the overall goals for emotional development and determine whether you need to observe for any other traits but i do think that this is probably quite difficult, you begin to understand a childs PSE with time, in a variety of different situations.

Could there be any supporting quotes in the practitioners section for emotional devevlopment.

 

Good luck. Hope I might have helped a little, if only to support what you have already covered.

 

Susan

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Hi Sandra,

I would say that emotional development is largely reflected in your target child's ability to:

1) be happy with new experiences, and changes to the established routine

2) be ready to form relationships with her peers and with trusted adults

3) stroll/run/skip into your setting, say goodbye to parent or carer, and be ready to take part amd enjoy her time there.

4) be able to express her needs and feelings appropriately

 

Emotional intelligence, or emotional competence as it is sometimes being called, is a subject about which very little has been written. Nicola Call's book explains it very well ("The Thinking Child") and, Daniel Goleman's book "Emotional intelligence", I understand, is very detailed (I haven't read this one, so can't comment).

Hope this helps :)

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Guest rhodessj

Thanks everyone

 

I hadn't thought of quoting from the pink book... I'd got tied up on finding a precise quote as I'd managed with the other areas of development. The TC is so well developed, I wouldn't mind in the least if the quote was slightly negative for her age/stage.

 

Although I had found some things that might be quotable elsewhere, I hadn't got anything in my observations that back them up! The child study in the new DPP is only carried out over one term (less in fact, as we're working on the assignment as we go not at the end...).

 

I have managed to assess that she has a fantastic self-esteem; tackles problems and challenges; and is happy to wave Mum off, but excited to see her at the end of the session, so thanks Helen for confirming I am on track.

 

Sandra

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At uni we have been looking at learning stories assessment from New Zealand. It is explained in detail in the book by margaret Carr. Basically it is where you sit and write a story of what your target child is doing, you don't include any judgements just what it actually happening. I have found this to be really useful for looking at aspects of PSED because it allows you to cover everything that is happening and means you can reflect later (when you have more time to think!). :o

 

I don't know if this is of any use but it might be a way to look at children in a variety of situations. I can send you the recording format if you would like.

 

Jay

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Guest rhodessj

Hi Jay

 

Thanks, I might well find the format useful. I have just managed to carry out a narrative on another child who I was having trouble with - followed her around for 1.5 hours and gathered loads of information.

 

The problem I had with the assignment was actually backing up what I've found with quotes! I shall see if I can get Margaret Carr's book.

 

Cheers

Sandra

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Guest rhodessj

Hi Jay

 

Thanks, I might well find the format useful. I have just managed to carry out a narrative on another child who I was having trouble with - followed her around for 1.5 hours and gathered loads of information.

 

The problem I had with the assignment was actually backing up what I've found with quotes! I shall see if I can get Margaret Carr's book.

 

Cheers

Sandra

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