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Hi,

 

Does anyone know how often Nursery and Reception aged children are expected to do dedicated phonics each week?

 

Up until last year Reception did phonics once a day and Nursery did phonics once or twice a week, then we changed to YR twice a day and YN once a day.

 

However, now an advisory teacher has been into school and said that she does not think that phonics needs to be done this frequently, especially in Nursery, as she does not think it has been written down anywhere.

 

I cannot find my course notes to confirm who told me this and where they got their information on this area. It would certainly make organisation easier if we do not need to do this but i also want to do what is right for the children.

 

Thanks for your help, Caroline

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We dont do phonics as such,in a pre-school.what we do is lots of rhymes and songs and games promoting letter sounds within the routine and planned activities.

I recently attended a course for this age and reception and I am happy we are doing it right.I cant remember how often for reception sorry.

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Yes, what I mean by phonics for Nursery is the early steps indicated by the stepping stones in the Playing with Sounds documentation which basically consists of rhymes, singing, alliteration, etc.

 

I just can't find anything that spells out how often these need to be done

 

Thanks for reply though Cx

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I have begun to have two 15 minute sessions a week on phonics looking and observing sounds/letters/songs etc.. i have produced a literacy folder and mathematical folder with lots of examples/articles and activities i have found in different magazines or off the internet.

 

the Jim rose report looks at different aspects of how to teach early reading and synthetic phonics, it is quite along read!! it can be downloaded at

 

www.teachernet.gov.uk/publications

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hi I understand now :)

Well we do some sort of singing,rhyme etc every session.And will touch on it when we can during routine free play etc For instance we have been talking about all the sounds we heard at the weekend and making a sound picture for our firework display so it was a golden opportunity to do some letter sounds. We tend to dip in and out of alliteraton and rhyming depending on the children really but we do a big push on it in the last term before they go to school.I do have a cd rom of the phonics course i went on last month I will try and remember (my memory is terrible at mo)to look at it tomo it might have info on how often on there i dont think i took notes on the reception side of things but again will look for you.

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Hi Caroline

 

We identified CLL as a weakness for most of the children entering the unit so adopted the Foundations of Literacy model Ros Bayley

We do daily rhyme singing listeningand keeping the beat activities with out nursery children and twice daily very short phonics input for reception part of it is with nursery and some formal JP.

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In my reception class I do the main whole class phonic input in the morning and have a shorter input in the afternoons (a arge proportion of my class are part-time until after Christmas)

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Guest sandcastles

I work in a foundation stage room and we have a jolly phonic of the week. The children take home a phonic sheet at the beginning of each week to learn. we play kim's game using items beginning with that phonic and think of ryhming words and non ryhming words. :o

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I work in a FSU and F1 have a daily rhyme and rhythmn session using traditional rhymes and beat baby activities, and F2 have a daily Jolly Phonic session focussing on one set of sounds per week using a visual, auditory and kinesthetic approach. This works really well for me. Hope this helps. x

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From the Primary Strategy the expectation for F2 - Y1 is a daily discrete phonics session (Phases 2,3,4) focusing on hearing sounds in the order they are written and segmenting/blending words. F1 should have a rich language based approach which focuses on the development of auditory discrimination (Phase 1) . Phase 5 (different spelling patterns) will continue into Y1 and phase 6 will be developed over Y2 but focuses more on the comprehension rather than phonic decoding/encoding.

 

Have a look at the guidance materials which are now being published alongside the revised frameworks/core papers.

Cx

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can you advise me on the progression of the teaching of phonics you do. i am using playing with sounds and jolly phonics. please advise me of when you introuduce intial sounds, cvc words etc.

 

thanks

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Guest tinkerbell

Hey went on phonic training yesterday and the LEA advisors were keen to share cvc words with us eg sheep is a cvc word.I said i had never seen Carole Vordaman get a constanant sh or a vowel ee,or ai,or oo etc :o

Tinkerbellx

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Guest tinkerbell

It has me intrigued too Susan I think I need to do abit of research ?

i will let you know when it becomes clear

Tinkerbellx

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I think strictly speaking /sh/ee/p/ would be a consonant digraph/long vowel /consonant word,not sure how I would code that. A simple cvc word would be e.g. /h/o/t/ and a word like sh/i/p would be a ccvc word.

But it's certainly a three phoneme word!

Cx

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  • 2 weeks later...

yeah I heard the same thing... so we suggested they think of a better name for all those words, that better explained what they are... cause CVC definately is misleading in that case... :o

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Hi

Remember the progression in phonics cdrom which is also with Playing With Sounds (PWS)- has lots of interesting training stuff on their. recommend PWS, Foundation s of Literacy, L is for Sheep (Featherstone ed'n) and lots of music/ rhyme, storying, speaking & listening activities (what does the practitioner need to do -CGFS) for daily activities. Only move to phase 2 - letter sounds/ names when children are ready - into green ss Remember you know and observe your children and when they are ready

LGM

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