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Does anyone know where i can get hold of word lists for jolly phonic sounds i.e words beginning with i... I know i'm being lazy but thought i list would be seful for when my mind draws a blank!!

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Talking of Jolly Phonics...did 'a' sound today, skywriting, sung jingles,etc, when we followed up the input and asked children to think of a word beginning with 'a' we got 'a ball', 'a bone', 'a cup' and so on. A while later my nursery nurse decided to prompt the children by saying 'What do we call a man who goes to the moon?' (obviously hoping for 'astronaut') 'Kevin!' came the reply!!!!! Couldn't stop laughing!!

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Sorry to hijack the thread but how many people still use JP?

I am Literacy as well as Early Years and was at a meeting about new strategies coming out soon, some people suggest not starting sounds until children have a real grasp with rhyming words, etc

What are your thoughts?

Also we use Playing with sounds as the inital steps are taught discreetly in Nursery and children need lots if rhyming activities before they are ready for phonics.

I have just started my sounds this week, but unsure, as probably 50% of the children are not ready for it!

Would love to hear what others think!

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Last year we changed to the PiPs order of teaching sounds but used JP as the main teaching 'method' this year I have found I am using very little JP (only retaining the actions to provide the multi sensory aspect) We are still doing 5 sounds a week although in a very informal way at the moment (no handwriting /sound sheets) Probably half the class know the majority of sounds taught so far but as you say the other half are just not ready.

We are also using Foundations of Literacy as a basis for our literacy teaching so lots of stories lots of rhymes lots of songs lots of keeping the beat lots of opportunities for speaking and listening.

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Oooh I am glad someone else is using the same as us! We use Jolly Phonics along with Pips games and teach the letters in the Pips order. It worked well last year so sticking to it.

Maureen

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We teach phonics using JP and it seems to work really well. As a school, we have now decided to introduce joined handwriting right from the start and the chidlren are finding this far more difficult to remember than the standard printing we taught last year.

Kellsa

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So are you using the cursive from the line variation? Either way I think children need to have a visual memory of the script letters and would teach them as stand alones before introducing the joins.

I used Cripps " A hand for Spelling" and particulary liked the practise that writing for writing was joined and writing for reading was not.

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We do use the worksheets, but have adapted them for cursive script. It does take one adult the whole day to get through 30 children though and I long for the day when it is all finished and we can have 2 interesting focus groups intsead of JP taking up one of them. What does everyone else do in this respect?

Kellsa

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I never use the worksheets! Can you imagine how much paper that would have involved for 90 children?

Also think the font/script size is far too small.

 

I agree Susan in the past we enlarged the sheets to A3 once the children had the basic letter formation.

 

We do use the worksheets, but have adapted them for cursive script. It does take one adult the whole day to get through 30 children though and I long for the day when it is all finished and we can have 2 interesting focus groups intsead of JP taking up one of them. What does everyone else do in this respect?

Kellsa

 

I did training with Sue Lloyd a few years ago and she said the worksheets were never intended to take that long. The idea is to introduce the letter formation and not to do any colouring or give instructions to colour a very small part the rest to be completed at home. With 82 in the unit what you describe would be unworkable and in my opinion a waste of effort.

 

We introduce the letters in the PiPs order using the JP stories and actions letter formation will be introduced later after alot of pre writing activities and then on a large scale initially before progressing to 'normal' sized (size depending on the childs ability) writing.

 

I must say after using JP for over 12 years I am using less of the activities each year.

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Having been an NQT last year, this is only my second year of doing JP and i must admit i totally agree with you about the colouring in etc. We never ask children to colour the sheets, they take an additionlal sheet home in a little book that comes back in to school every day - this is not for homework, but just to keep the parents up to date with what and how they have learnt their sounds etc. If they want to, they can pratise the sheet again and colour this one in. We have adapted the sheets and only expect the children to spend a short time on the activity including the lead up with writing in sand/whiteboards etc. Because we tend to work in small groups initially it akes ages to get through everyone!!! I am also using larger writing skill activities with children who find it very difficult and we do the Write Dance program too. I am hoping to get some JP training though,as i would like to have more ideas to keep it fresh and new and exciting throughout the year, even once we get to tricky words and so on. It is easy to let it get samey and i really don't want that. Does anyone else find this tricky?

kellsa

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I'm into my third year of using JP. We adapted the worksheets to fully cursive script at head's request and included a patter for writing each letter (agreed by HT and intended for use across school). This year we have moved away from doing the handwriting on the sheet but send it home so that parents are aware of action, story, patter, handwriting style etc. I got some ideas on here from Marion I think for varying the writing input and now we're doing a variety of things. Very large writing on big whiteboards, small whiteboards, rainbow letters on A3, writing in sandtray, painting letters on paving slabs with water and big brushes. This is taking less time than the sheets did and is more fun for the children. Some of them are colouring their sheets and doing some handwriting at home, but we stressed in guidance to parents only to do this if they feel their child is ready. I'm still asking myself questions about whether this is the right approach for all of them - as some of the younger ones are really struggling with writing, pencil grip, movements etc. Perhaps I should invest in writedance.

 

Which activities from PIPs and playing with sounds do the rest of you find most successful?

 

AOB

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I think the test of whether a child can make windmills forwards and backwards is a good way to assess if they are physically ready for writing.

 

Pebble game

Kims game

I went to the shop and bought

 

 

Bit of a tangent but this was our phonics lesson yesterday 'u' is for umbrella

 

 

amazing what fun you can have with a hosepipe :o

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post-4544-1159997020_thumb.jpg

post-4544-1159997075_thumb.jpg

Edited by Marion
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:D Ah so cute Marion! I bet they'll never forget that one. Did they all bring brollies in or do you have a selection? A real downpour followed U input for us, just a day late. I had several very excited pupils on the playground at lunchtime wanting to show theirs off to me. So proud! I think the input mine have enjoyed most so far has been the 'pet' soft toy dog 'Rags' from the home corner doing a great tussle with the baby's blanket from the house. Sorry no snaps! It caused lots of hilarity and further play with the toy in the role play house. Thanks for all the writing ideas, I think ours are enjoying it much more this year. I'm sure it's still not perfect, but nothing ever is, so better than it was last time around is OK!

AOB

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I have always used draw a triangle to see when children are really ready for letter formation. I've known this so many years now I cant remember where the original idea came from (perhaps someone else does?) and I find it accurate in most cases (alwasy exceptions I think to pretty much anything we do)

 

Ask children to draw a triangle freehand, showing them a triangle if they dont know what one is. Dont model how you might draw it, just ask them to draw one. Basically what they draw falls into three broad categories.

 

1. A vaguely triangular or square rounded shape made with one contniuous arm movement..these children will not cope with letter formation yet

 

 

2. An underastnding that there are 3 definate lines (occasioanlly 4) but these dont join and may look like the capitla E without the middle 'prong'. These children can identify change in direction and so are nearly ready to write letters, but not quite.

 

3. Children draw a triangle with definate changes in direction, and 3 straight lines (occasionaly they dont quite join up). Thee children are ready for learning correct letter formation.

 

I find it a useful guide and have been using it for many years.

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:D Ah so cute Marion! I bet they'll never forget that one. Did they all bring brollies in or do you have a selection? A real downpour followed U input for us, just a day late. I had several very excited pupils on the playground at lunchtime wanting to show theirs off to me. So proud! I think the input mine have enjoyed most so far has been the 'pet' soft toy dog 'Rags' from the home corner doing a great tussle with the baby's blanket from the house. Sorry no snaps! It caused lots of hilarity and further play with the toy in the role play house. Thanks for all the writing ideas, I think ours are enjoying it much more this year. I'm sure it's still not perfect, but nothing ever is, so better than it was last time around is OK!

AOB

 

We sent a letter home asking parents to send waterproof coats and umbrellas if they had them and warned them their child would get extremely wet :o . (We have a selection of wellies and a few umbrellas in the rainy day box so could supply those children whose parents forgot) We turned a hose pipe on our little darlings :D

 

Marion What do you mean by windmills backwards andforwards? i think I know but can you just clarify please? The umbrellas look brill you are so clever.

 

 

Stand in a space raise arms to shoulder height and make big circular movements both forwards and backwards. :D

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