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Famous Artist For Reception


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Next year we have been asked to choose a different artist for each year group. These artists will be used for a Art Week where we will look at the artists life and look at their work and use as inspiration for our own art work. Another teacher beat me to Van Gogh xD and the other artists that were mentioned don't exactly fill me with inspiration. I've eventually opted for Jackson Pollock - just because some of his works of art look suitable large scale and messy and therefore achieveable - though most of it looks pretty naff to me (sorry Pollock :o ).

 

I had thought of Mondrian, blocks of colour and possible to do on the computer, but not sure how much further I could go with this. Does anyone have any good 'simple' artists that would be suitable. I have to say that my standard of art is probably little better than my 4 year olds.

 

I'm sure I saw some work by Paul Klee done by Reception once, or maybe Lowry's the way to go, I could at least teach them the song 'Matchstalk Men and Matchstalk cats and dogs!'

 

All ideas gratefully received.

Harricroft

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hi

i have seen kandinsky -his circle picture used with rec. they decorated biscuits with different coloured icing and cut out circles using tissue paper and coloured gummed paper.

 

hope this helps

 

louise

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My children's school classes are starting from reception (only 5 classes): Hockney, Constable, Lowry, Constable and Hepworth, each class has the artists work on the walls it is a lovely idea.

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Snap Posy

 

We have nearly completed a half term looking at the work of Henri Rousseau and Jungles.

 

The children have really enjoyed it and so have staff.

 

Other artists.... Monet, Matisse (the snail), Uccello (George and the dragon)

 

Have a look at the the take one picture website... they do teacher packs for their featured paintings.

 

Good Luck... I have done Take one picture for the last 4 years and really enjoyed it.

 

L

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how brilliant wish i was doing that.

 

jackson pollock is good to do. can work on circles, lines, anti clockwise movments and lots of squirting, dribbbling and pouring paints, could have a big sheet outside and lots of squirty bottles. also could dribble paint then use tools such as cotton buds etc to manipulate paint. could also use water soakers to squirt paint, coloured water.

 

and a really fun but messy idea for pollocks work is to dribble paint on a large sheet of paper outside and ride the bikes through it makes brilliant work.

 

van gogh also uses thick paint that the children could manipulate around with forks.

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Hi

 

I would recommend Matisse - in his later years he created art by tearing coloured paper and applying it to canvas - most famously 'the snail'. children are easily able to tear coloured sheets of paper and place them onto a large piece of paper/card until they are pleased with the results - Could even take a photo, move the paper around then take another photo, photos could be displayed with art. Could suggest copying shape/movement of a minibeast other than snail perhaps! could also be great group project, taking turns to place paper, working together to create work.

 

Have fun.

 

P.S. Quote by Picasso "Every Child is an Artist". How true...

 

 

Mon

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Guest flutter

Hi,

I saw some work done in a reception class in the style of Friedenreich Hundertwasser. I have now tried this with my class with great success - bright colourful houses with whole page coloured. Looked fantastic when framed with coloured paper.

 

Hope you enjoy whatever you decide to choose. I am sure the children will have fun.

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We have also done some work around Hunderwasser and Kadinsky as part of a whole school focus for display in the school hall, these were really effective and the children enjoyed doing it. If you do a google image search of an artist's name or piece of work tyou will find examples of other school's work on their web sites.

 

We have also been involved in the National Gallery Take one Picyure which was interesting as it introduced us to a painting thaty we possible wouldn't have chosen ourselves but allowed for us and more importantly the children to be very creative in their interpretation of what was important to them.... our children were particulartly interested in a very small cockerell in a Cannaletto painting and then we all went on a "Gondala Ride"!

 

Sharon

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Wow! Thanks for all the terrific artists - some of them I've never heard of. Our art co-ordinator is coming in on Friday and we're going to have a go at doing something together and I'd already thought of doing the paint squirting on a large scale. I had also thought of children riding the bikes through paint but couldn't quite work out how to get trays big enough for the wheels to go in, but if we did paint squirting first and then ride bikes over like you suggest clk7, that would work. I'll take a photo of the squirting and then once bikes have been ridden through and then we can compare the results.

 

I'm beginning to feel a lot more enthusiastic now :D

 

Thanks again.

PS - we've been told, in reception, we can choose more than one artist so I should be able to use lots of these super ideas.

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Lots of super ideas. I think Rousseau or Matisse myself. I have frequently looked at an illustrator rather than a painter or sculpture. I think we forget that illustrators are artists. Raymond Briggs is a really good one and so is Eric Carle. I had some wonderful work by the children on both. You can link the work with CLL as well as Eric Carle is particularly suitable for Reception in their first term in school.

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Saw a programme recently about Jackson Pollock - his nick name made me laugh: Jack the Dripper :o

 

Blow paintings are effective for this style too - I've done huge collaborative ones in the past with groups of reception children.

We recently went outside with big decorators brushes and did lots of dripping and splashing onto paper - great fun and pretty messy too :D

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We've just had the most fantastic afternoon. I plumped for Jackson Pollock as I wanted something they could achieve in one afternoon and with little preparation. I found all the nearly empty ready mixed paint bottles (and added a few extra), put some paint in tubs, slightly watered down, and provided a range of different sized paint brushes, including decorating size brushes.

 

I did a quick intro to the artist (found some images on Google including one of Pollock standing over a canvas). We put some examples of his work on the IWB and discussed the colours he'd used. The children really suprised me with the different things they could see in the paintings - obviously art critics of the future. We flashed back to Pollock and asked how the children thought he'd made the pictures. We talked about his splashing the paint onto the canvas. The children were really motivated and were really patient and helpful as we tried to sellotape sheets of paper down on the playground and did some problem solving trying to find things to weigh down the paper in the corners.

 

They LOVED squirting the paint around the paper and dripping it off their brushes (and if they ended up with paint on themselves it's nearly the end of the school year and most will be getting new uniforms - I hope :o ) The finished results were great :D . We just used one that had got great puddles of paint on to ride a scooter through to get a tire track pattern - brilliant (I just have to clean it off next week - guess we'll be having a 'car wash' in our garage xD

 

Thanks for all your great ideas - I'll definately be using more of them in the future.

 

Harricroft

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Will try to attach some photos - not really sure now to do it :o

 

post-1133-1152986628_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Hope it works!!

Harricroft

 

post-1133-1152986847_thumb.jpgMMmmmmmmmmmmm, only one photo when I put in three?????????

 

Hopefully here's another one.

 

 

 

post-1133-1152986982_thumb.jpgAnd another

 

post-1133-1152987193_thumb.jpg

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Jackson Pollock has been the most popular we've done this year... we bought some canvasses and mixed poster paint with PVA and had the children squirting and mixing with brushes and flicking paint... the end product is ace! ... we've had a few offers for ours as we did three huge ones and they all hang together!!!

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If anyone is doing Rousseau and his tiger in the jungle you can go on the Tate website and animate the picture, get the sounds of the jungle etc, my class loved it! Hope the link is still there.

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matisse is a good artist to study and we recently made some fantastic clay models inspired by Edgar Degas the little dancer Andy Warhol is also a artist with an interesting style to investigate

picasso

van gogh

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The Paris Web Museum is a good site to download samples of work by famous painters. Lots to inspire. I printed off pictures by Mondrian and Kandinsky which I then laminated before using. Address is

www.ibiblio.org/wm

Denise

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